LACER/ACTIONS OF LONDON: MY “STREET SIGNS” IN A VIDEOCLIP

 

 I’ve already wrote it in a post at WordPress: London is really an “open air” art museum that you may visit every day, without paying an entrance ticket. It’s enough to walk along the streets, open your eyes wide an let your perception flow. You may see torn posters and capturing colored signs. During my last visit to London I had the way to catch lot of images. I showed some of them in a previous post. Now I’ve created a clip, with other nine pics. I’ve posted the video at YouTube, BlipTV and Animoto. Its title is (obviously!) “Lacer/actions of London”; the claim: “Torn posters / Street (de)signs” . Soundtrack: “Wake up” by Mackintosh Braun. Enjoy it.

 YouTube

http://youtu.be/ShJ_j-s06Go

 

Animoto

http://animoto.com/play/WBPxxng94YhTOhtaq1nu3g

 

Blip.Tv

http://blip.tv/laceractions-lacerazioni/lacer-actions-of-london-5690505

 

 

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THAT MAGICAL CRYPT IN THE TUSCANY MEDIEVAL VILLAGE WHERE THE ITALIAN LANGUAGE WAS BORN

Abbadia San Salvatore, on Amiata Mount (Siena area, Tuscany, Italy) is a place rich of art and history… 

 

In Abbadia San Salvatore, on Amiata MountSiena area, Tuscany, Italy – there is a magical and capturing place. You find it on the ancient abbey church. It is a crypt, where you may breath the history and the beauty of one of the most fascinating Tuscany village.

According the documents, the crypt was built in VIII Century. It was restored in XX Century and now we may admire it in all its beauty. Everytime I have the way to visit it, I always feel astonished by its magic. It happened again a few days ago, when I was in Abbadia SS. for the XIII edition of “Penne and Video Sconosciuti”, the national festival for school journals and videos produced by italian schools.

The Longobard crypt shows 32 columns that form 13 small aisles. They are made in various shapes; some of them are round, with different sculpured ornaments. Also the beautiful capitals are sculptured in various shapes, as palm leaves, loto flowers or animal heads.

 

The abbey and all the Medieval centreare telling us how Abbadia San Salvatore was important in the past. All its area is rich in history and traditions, that to a great extent can be found in documents in the old archive belonging to the monastery dedicated to the Saviour at Amiata Mount. The archive contains many references to the importance and power of the abbey, but little or no reference is made to the early Medieval history of the surrounding land and area, or about the people who used to live there.

The castle of Abbadia is first mentioned in a document dating to 1203, which shows that the community was came under the aegis of a communal hierarchy headed by a Podestà, under the political control of Orvieto. A few years later, the strenght and power of this communal organization are described in the “bill of freedom” (“carta delle libertà”) granted in 1212 to communal chancellors by the Abbot of the San Salvatore monastery.

The pattern of settlements in the area of Abbadia was defined around the mid-XII Century, when under the pressure of external threats, the local population, up until then scattered over the surrounding countryside, came together within one large fortified settlement.

 

This Benedectine monastery was founded by Erfo, a Longobard nobleman, in the VIII Century, under King Astolfo, and it was dedicated to the Saviour, which was typical of that people and in the tradition of christian religion. It rose on the east side of Amiata Mount in order to reclaim the surrounding woods and forests. It also overlooked the Via Francigena, running through the Paglia Valley.

The imperial abbey greatly developed in the Carolingian period thanks to Charlemagne‘s and Ludovick‘s confirmation of its landed propertues and privileges, Around the year 1000, under Abbot Winizo, it increased its power by acquiring new territories. The church and the crypt were rebuilt in 1036. In 1228 the monastery passed to the Cistercians. It was suppressed by grand-duke Pietro Leopoldo in 1782 and re-opened later.

 

In the year 1087, a certain Miciarello and his wife Gualdrada made a donation in favour of the monastery of St Saviour. Below the donation document, the notary Ranieri signed three verses, commonly known as “Cartula Amiatina” (“The Amiata Footnote”). This extemporary poem represents to linguists the first voice of vernacular coming from Tuscany. That is, the first expressions recording the evolution of the Italian language.

But this is not the only important document about Amiata History. Till XIX Century, the monastery hosted the famous “Bibbia Amiatina”“The Amiata Bible” – which is considered the oldest latin version ever known. The Amiata Bible – a real art masterpiece, written by amanuensis monks – is now kept in Florence, but we may see a photo-reproduction in the Monastery Museum.

The historical centre is a well kept fortress-village, where you may walk through incredible narrow streets and squares, all built with the local grey stone. You may admire the Servadio Theatre (1873), a tiny but fascinating place. It was built thanks to the initiative of the Carli and Gragnoli families; it is dedicated to Giacomo Servadio (XIX Century) a Florentine member of Italian Parliament, banker, musician and theatre producer. Between the end of XIX Century and the beginning of the XX, the building was the seat of a friendly Society of the workers of Abbadia, where in XIX Century quicksilver mines began their activities, now closed and presented in a museum.

By ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

STREETS OF LONDON, “OPEN AIR” ART GALLERY

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In the very heart of London catchin’ images of torn posters and signs from the walls… For my “Lacer/actions” art.

During my recent participation at Parallax AF at La Galleria, I had the way to have a look around in the very heart of London trying to catch some images of torn and decomposed posters (yes, I can’t resist!) The British metropolis offered me again so many signs layed on its walls. As an open air gallery, London revealed itself through incredible colors and shapes. In every street I walked along I noticed particulars and details all linked by a sort of a common language and dye.

In Haymarket, not so distant from La Galleria, I captured blue oriented images. In High Holborn Street the dominat color was green. In St. Giles Street some ripped posters presented details in which I had no difficulties to see pop-art elements. And again: I catched black and white images in Leicester Square, red and blue in Yorkway. Along Moor Street, outside a dockyard, I saw (and impressed on my camera) images that mixed up ripped papers, glue castings, spontaneous drawings left by some anonymous hands. Such incredible colored effects!

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI LACER/ACTIONS ART – 2011

As usually, in ripped and decomposed publicity posters I find a lot of styles and art streams: from modernism to cubism, from abstractionism to post-modernism, from vorticism to impressionism… Yes, so lot of “ism”, but I prefer to call all those images with my favourite term: “Lacer/actionism”… London is really an “open air” art museum that you may visit every day, without paying an entrance ticket. It’s enough to walk along the streets, open your eyes wide an let your perception flow.

Roberto Alborghetti

 WATCH THE CLIP…

YouTube

http://youtu.be/ShJ_j-s06Go

Animoto

http://animoto.com/play/WBPxxng94YhTOhtaq1nu3g

MILAN, THE 2nd MASTER IN MENSWEAR: TRAINING THE TALENTS OF THE FUTURE

 Istituto Marangoni and Ermenegildo Zegna together again to form the menswear talents of tomorrow.

 

 Istituto Marangoni, the prestigious fashion school founded in 1935, and Ermenegildo Zegna Group, the luxury menswear brand founded in 1910, two among the most reputed players in the world of Italian fashion, have renewed their commitment to training emerging fashion designers and inaugurated the second edition of the Master in Menswear at the Milan campus. From the common didactic purpose of two Italian fashion leaders comes the desire to offer a high level specialisation course, delivering the best educational and practical preparation in response to the constant evolution of contemporary menswear style.

The course includes a thorough analysis of the menswear industry, focusing on the various stages of production process until acquiring a clear overview of: the concept of suits, outerwear and shirts, the structure of the collection and the packaging of the product through to its distribution. An important asset for the Master will be the participation of top managers and creative directors from Ermenegildo Zegna group. In this second edition, they will once again share with students their precious professional experience in product management, style and retail. I am honoured and proud that the Ermenegildo Zegna Group has agreed to join us in this important project, for the second year in a row – said Roberto Riccio, Group Managing Director of Istituto Marangoni – Our school has always been committed to training the talents of the future, and is the only Italian school able to provide a concrete response, with expertise and timeliness, to the specific requirements of the menswear industry, by training future professionals who are capable of understanding and interpreting with personality the menswear universe and its trends. I am sure that the involvement of the Ermenegildo Zegna Group will help us strengthen the excellence of our training and will provide students with know-how of the highest level of professionalism within the menswear industry.”

The Master will deal with all aspects of menswear collections, from formal and upper casual with Ermenegildo Zegna and fashion with Z Zegna to urban with Zegna Sport. It will give students the opportunity to explore freehand and digital drawing techniques, modelling and learn how clothing is made, from the simplest to the most structured garments. It will also cover all the topics concerning product management and production flow administration.

Once again in this second edition, students will be confronted with stimulating creative projects, inspired by the Group’s different brands, and they will have the possibility to visit the company’s production sites for fabrics, knitwear and ready-to-wear garments, the headquarters and the Zegna showroom in Milan. The special guest present in the jury which will identify the best student comes from the media: Michele Lupi, Editor in Chief of “Rolling Stone” magazine, who will bring a fresh, cross-cutting perspective on the style and creativity of the students. The Menswear Award will be delivered to the best course participant, selected according to Zegna and Istituto Marangoni criteria, who will be offered a 3-month internship within one of the brands and, as in the previous edition, will have the opportunity to participate in the organisation of Zegna fashion show in June 2012 in Milan.

Benedetta Zegna, Ermenegildo Zegna’s Talent Management Director, who attended the opening ceremony for the course at Istituto Marangoni, stated: “The decision to continue to support this wonderful initiative is motivated by the quality of the educational offer of Istituto Marangoni and especially of the projects undertaken by the students. The selected talents are bringing ideas and a fresh look to the company’s creative teams.

An important aspect, which we continue to explore in the Master’s program, involves visits to our Group’s production sites, which allow students to feel the extreme quality of the fabrics and products first hand, and to understand the centrality of detail as a key factor for that perfect blend of craftsmanship and technological innovation that is typically Italian.

The idea of inviting Michele Lupi to serve on the jury comes from the desire to give voice to an outside perspective, through the eyes of a man engaged in different environments, always characterised by attention to emerging trends and emerging signs of style.”

The Master began on October 3rd, 2011 at the Milan campus, will last 8 months and includes 7 classes of 2h30 a week. The lessons will be taught in Italian with a simultaneous English translation.

 

MASTER IN MENSWEAR

Limited number (20 places available)

Beginning

October 3rd , 2011

Study Program

  • Menswear Design

  • Fashion Graphics

  • Fashion Panorama

  • Fashion Industry Analysis

  • Research Method

  • Product Management

Attendance

7 lessons per week – 2h30 each

Duration

8 months

Admission Requirements

– A portfolio that demonstrates the candidate’s creative and drawing abilities

– A detailed professional and educational CV that includes: degree or diploma certificate with the final mark awarded

– 100 word cover letter describing professional aims and aspirations and clearly putting forward the reasons and motivation for wanting to participate in the Master’s program

– At least one references letter from an employer or teacher

– Knowledge of Italian or English language

To be admitted to the master, candidates must attend an orientation interview and submit the application form, provided during the interview or downloadable from www.istitutomarangoni.com duly completed.

 

ABOUT ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA

Ermenegildo Zegna Group is a leading maker of luxury menswear and one of the most highly renowned enterprises in Italy. It was founded in 1910 in Trivero, in the Alpi Biellesi, by the young entrepreneur Ermenegildo Zegna, who started to produce some of the finest and most highly prized fabrics in the world. The Company is now led by the 4th generation of the Zegna family. By the end of the ’90s the Group had completed its verticalization strategy and created a global luxury brand that makes fabrics, clothing and accessories and is focused on retail business (mostly through directly operated stores). The Group is a pioneering force in opening up emerging markets. In 2010, it celebrated its first centennial, marking 100 years of industrial excellence. Today it has 570 single-brand stores, of which 300 proprietary, in 80 countries, with consolidated sales of euro 963 million in 2010.

 ABOUT ISTITUTO MARANGONI:

Istituto Marangoni was founded in 1935. It now has three generations of students to its credit and has launched over 35,000 professionals, including some of the most important names in international fashion, such as Domenico Dolce, Franco Moschino, Rodolfo Paglialunga, Umit Benan, Alessandro Sartori, Francesco Russo and many others. Istituto Marangoni’s mission has remained the same: to create professionals for the fashion and design industry, people with solid knowledge and know-how, creativity and an understanding of the needs of business. Istituto Marangoni now has 2,400 students from 92 countries. It has three campuses in the capitals of international fashion, design and creativity (Milan, Paris and London) providing 3-year courses, Master’s courses and 1-year courses at all levels.

 

 MASTER IN MENSWEAR: LA MODA FORMA I TALENTI DI DOMANI

 Istituto Marangoni ed Ermenegildo Zegna nuovamente insieme per formare i creativi della moda maschile di domani. Partita la seconda edizione del prestigioso Master in Menswear nel campus di Milano

 L’Istituto Marangoni, scuola di moda nata nel 1935, e il Gruppo Ermenegildo Zegna, brand del lusso maschile fondato nel 1910, due importanti realtà del mondo della moda italiana, hanno rinnovato il proprio impegno nella formazione dei creativi emergenti inaugurando la seconda edizione del Master in Menswear nel campus di Milano.

Dalla comunione di intenti di due eccellenze della moda italiana è nata la volontà di proporre un corso di specializzazione di alto livello, in grado di offrire agli studenti la migliore preparazione didattica e pratica per rispondere alla costante evoluzione dello stile maschile contemporaneo.

Il Corso prevede un’approfondita analisi del settore dell’abbigliamento uomo, declinata nello studio delle differenti fasi del processo produttivo fino all’acquisizione di una chiara visione di insieme: dal concetto di abito, capo spalla e camicia, alla struttura della collezione, dal confezionamento del prodotto alla sua distribuzione. Importante atout del Master sarà l’intervento di manager e direttori creativi del gruppo Ermenegildo Zegna che – anche per questa seconda edizione – testimonieranno agli studenti la propria esperienza professionale nell’ambito del prodotto, dello stile e del retail, trasferendo loro contenuti essenziali, che solo il mondo del lavoro è pienamente in grado di mettere in campo.

Sono onorato e orgoglioso che il Gruppo Ermenegildo Zegna abbia accettato di unirsi a noi in questo importante progetto, per il secondo anno consecutivo – ha dichiarato Roberto Riccio, Group Managing Director di Istituto Marangoni – La nostra scuola, da sempre impegnata a formare i talenti del futuro, è la sola italiana in grado di rispondere concretamente, con competenza e tempestività, alle esigenze e specificità del settore, formando futuri professionisti in grado di comprendere e interpretare con personalità l’universo della moda maschile, tipicamente italiano, e il divenire delle sue tendenze. Sono certo che il coinvolgimento del Gruppo Ermenegildo Zegna ci aiuterà a consolidare l’eccellenza della nostra offerta formativa e assicurerà agli studenti il know-how delle professionalità più alte della moda maschile”.

 

Il Master affronterà tutti gli aspetti delle collezioni uomo nelle declinazioni formale e upper casual con Ermenegildo Zegna, fashion con Z Zegna, e urban con Zegna Sport; darà agli studenti la possibilità di approfondire le tecniche d’illustrazione a mano libera e a computer, la modellistica e le tecniche di costruzione dei capi, dai più semplici ai più strutturati; approfondirà inoltre tutti gli aspetti legati al product management e alla gestione della produzione.

 

Anche in questa seconda edizione gli studenti potranno cimentarsi in stimolanti progetti creativi ispirati ai diversi brand del Gruppo, e visitare le sedi produttive di tessuto, maglieria e ready to wear, il quartier generale e la show room milanese Zegna. Special guest presente in giuria, un ospite proveniente dal mondo dei Media: Michele Lupi, Direttore del Magazine “Rolling Stone”, che apporterà una prospettiva nuova e trasversale sullo stile e la creatività dei ragazzi. Il Menswear Award verrà assegnato al migliore diplomato, selezionato in base a criteri Zegna e Istituto Marangoni, cui sarà offerto uno stage di 3 mesi all’interno di uno dei brand e, come nella precedente edizione, avrà l’opportunità di partecipare all’organizzazione della sfilata di giugno 2012 a Milano.

 

Ha dichiarato Benedetta Zegna, Responsabile Talenti Ermenegildo Zegna, presente alla cerimonia di apertura dei Corsi presso l’Istituto: “La decisione di continuare a sostenere questa bellissima iniziativa è motivata dalla qualità del supporto didattico offerto dall’Istituto Marangoni e soprattutto dei progetti realizzati dai ragazzi. I talenti selezionati stanno apportando idee e freschezza ai team creativi in azienda.

Un aspetto importante, che continuiamo ad arricchire all’interno del programma del master, riguarda le visite alle realtà produttive del nostro Gruppo, che permettono agli studenti di “toccare con mano” la qualità estrema dei tessuti e dei prodotti, e di comprendere la centralità del dettaglio come fattore chiave di quella perfetta integrazione tra artigianalità e innovazione tecnologica, tipicamente italiana.

L’idea di invitare Michele Lupi a far parte della giuria nasce dal desiderio di dare voce a una prospettiva esterna, attraverso lo sguardo di un uomo impegnato in ambienti diversi, sempre caratterizzati dall’attenzione alle tendenze emergenti e ai segnali di stile emergenti.”

Il Master è iniziato il 3 Ottobre 2011 nel campus di Milano, durerà 8 mesi e prevederà 7 lezioni settimanali da 2h30. Le lezioni si terranno in lingua italiana, con traduzione simultanea in inglese.

 

www.istitutomarangoni.com

  

CORSO MASTER in MENSWEAR

Numero chiuso (20 posti disponibili)

Inizio

3 ottobre 2011

Piano di studi

  • Menswear Design

  • Fashion Graphics

  • Panorama della Moda

  • Analisi dell’industria della moda

  • Metodologia della ricerca

  • Product Management

Frequenza

7 lezioni settimanali – 2h30 ognuna

Durata

8 mesi

Requisiti per l’Ammissione

– un Portfolio che mostri chiaramente la capacità creativa e di illustrazione del candidato

– un CV professionale e di studi dettagliato che includa: certificato di laurea o di diploma con la votazione conseguita

– una lettera di motivazione di 100 parole nella quale descrivere gli obiettivi professionali e di crescita e comunicare con chiarezza le ragioni e le motivazioni che spingono a volere partecipare al Master

– almeno una lettera di referenze dal datore di lavoro o dal docente

– conoscenza della lingua italiana o della lingua inglese.

Per accedere ai corsi master è obbligatorio sostenere un colloquio di orientamento e presentare la domanda di ammissione, consegnata durante il colloquio o scaricabile dal sito debitamente compilata.

 A proposito di Ermenegildo Zegna:

Il Gruppo Ermenegildo Zegna è leader nell’abbigliamento maschile di lusso e una delle realtà imprenditoriali più rinomate in Italia. Fondato nel 1910 a Trivero, sulle Alpi Biellesi, dal giovane imprenditore Ermenegildo Zegna che iniziò con una produzione di tessuti tra i più fini e pregiati al mondo, l’Azienda è oggi guidata dalla quarta generazione della Famiglia Zegna.

Con la fine degli anni ’90 il Gruppo ha completato la sua strategia di verticalizzazione e dato vita a un brand del lusso globale che produce tessuti, capi di abbigliamento e accessori, focalizzato sul retail – per lo più a gestione diretta – e pioniere nel penetrare i mercati emergenti.

Nel 2010 sono stati celebrati 100 anni di eccellenza. Oggi i negozi monomarca, presenti in 80 paesi, sono 570, di cui 300 di proprietà, Listencon un fatturato consolidato nel 2010 pari a 963 milioni di Euro.

 A proposito di Istituto Marangoni:

Istituto Marangoni nasce nel 1935. Da allora ha al suo attivo un bilancio formativo di tre generazioni di studenti ed è stato il trampolino di lancio per oltre 35.000 professionisti, tra i quali nomi importanti della moda internazionale come Domenico Dolce, Franco Moschino, Rodolfo Paglialunga, Umit Benan, Alessandro Sartori, Francesco Russo, e molti altri. La missione dell’Istituto Marangoni è sempre la stessa: creare professionisti per il sistema moda e design che abbiano una predisposizione al sapere e al saper fare e un’attitudine consolidata alla creatività, applicata alle necessità aziendali. Istituto Marangoni conta oggi 2.400 studenti provenienti da 92 differenti nazioni, che si dividono nei tre campus situati nelle tre capitali internazionali della moda, del design e della creatività: a Milano, a Parigi, e a Londra. L’offerta formativa propone corsi triennali, master e annuali a tutti i livelli.

 

 

ITALIAN SCHOOL JOURNALS: CREATING AN ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION AS REGARDS THE SO CALLED “OFFICIAL PRESS”

 At Mirabilandia (Ravenna, Italy) the final event of the 9th edition of Italian School Journalism Award.

It’s always a great experience, for me, to participate to the selection commission of “GiornaliNoi”, the Italian School Journalism Award promoted by Mirabilandia – the Adriatic Riviera amusement park (Ravenna, Italy) – in association with Okay! monthly magazine. And it is always an interesting moment to attend the final event: the prizes ceremony with students, school magazines teams and educational institutions coming from various parts of Italy. Mirabilandia gave awards according school orders (primary, secondary and high schools) ; they were also awarded special prizes.

Giovanni Scafoglio, general manager of Mirabilandia special events, met students answering to questions about the Park history and activities. The event was attended by Barbara Malano (Educational Projects) and by the undersigned, as Okay! editor in chief. During the ceremony I presented the “Top themes 2011”, that is the arguments on which students wrote most during the year. At the top of the chart: reportages and articles about the 150th Anniversary of Italy Unification.

GiornaliNoi” – the first Italian School Press Prize – is at its Ninth edition. It continues to increase importance and interest among Italian schools. It is considered as a great opportunity to give voice to new generations. It is also a sort of challenge by which kids and young people try to create alternative medias and communications as regards the so-called “official information” (newspapers, magazines, reviews).

This year “GiornaliNoi” Award received more than 350 school journals, of all forms and types, all well written and well structured layouts as well as the topics and sections. I really appreciated the big leap in graphics and design; in some case, they have nothing to envy to the official press. As demonstrated by the rigour and seriousness of all the works I saw, the Miribilandia initiative dedicated to school journalism is a reflection of the new generations and the way that young people, along with teachers and their families, are involved in a reality – the medias world, the media literacy – that requires a greater knowledge and behavior in terms of tools and skills. The ability to observe and write does not fail. Italian school journals are showing us students who are passionate about ideas and projects for a better tomorrow.

 ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

 

  “GIORNALINOI 2011”: IL GIORNALISMO SCOLASTICO SFIDA I “MEDIA” DEI GRANDI

 A Mirabilandia la premiazione del IX Premio di Giornalismo Scolastico promosso dal grande Parco della Riviera Adriatica.

 E’ sempre una bella esperienza, umana e professionale, partecipare alla selezione ed alla scelta delle testate scolastiche in gara a GiornaliNoi”, il Premio di Giornalismo Scolastico, promosso sul mensile Okay! da Mirabiandia, il grande Parco della Riviera adriatica. Ed è sempre interessante partecipare all’evento finale, con la premiazione di studenti ed istituti scolastici provenienti da varie parti d’Italia. Anche quest’anno la premiazione si è svolta nel clima clima scenografico di Halloween, evento al quale Mirabilandia ha dedicato aperture straordinarie di ottobre e di inizio novembre. Oltre ai premi divisi per categoria scolastica (scuole primarie, scuole secondarie di 1° grado, istituti comprensivi scolastici, scuole secondarie di 2° grado) sono stati conferiti 5 Premi speciali.

Giovanni Scafoglio, responsabile Eventi di Mirabilandia, ha risposto alle numerosissime domande sul Parco. All’evento hanno partecipato Barbara Malano (Progetti Didattici) ed il sottoscritto, in qualità di direttore di Okay!. Nel corso della manifestazione è stata svelata la classifica dei “temi top 2011”, che ha visto l’argomento del 150° dell’Unità d’Italia al primo posto delle rilevazioni effettute sui giornali scolastici.

GiornaliNoi”, il Premio di Giornalismo Scolastico, alla sua IX edizione continua ad essere sempre più al centro dell’interesse della scuola italiana. Ed ad essere sempre una occasione per dare voce alle nuove generazioni, sempre più intenzionate a “sfidare” le cosiddette testate fatte dai grandi. Quest’anno sono pervenute al Premio oltre 350 testate scolastiche, di ogni forma e tipo, tutte ben redatte ed impaginate oltre che ottimamente strutturate negli argomenti e nelle sezioni. Un grande salto di qualità anche nella grafica e nel design, con giornali che nulla hanno da invidiare ai periodici “ufficiali”.

Come dimostrano anche il rigore e la serietà dei temi affrontati, l’iniziativa che Mirabilandia dedica al giornalismo scolastico è un riflesso della realtà delle nuove generazioni e del cammino che i ragazzi, insieme ai docenti, alle scuole ed alle loro famiglie e comunità, stanno percorrendo in questi tempi che necessitano una sempre maggiore preparazione e conoscenza in fatto di strumenti della comunicazione. La capacità di osservare e di scrivere non manca. Dai giornali scolastici emerge una nuova generazioni di cronisti che si appassionano alle idee ed ai progetti per un domani migliore.

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

THE LIFE BECOMES ART: WELCOME TO PARALLAX AF IN LONDON!

I was there showing my “LACER/ACTIONS” project. I met fellow artists and I had the way to know something about their art. Here are some stories…

 By ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

  

I may say that art world met at Parallax AF in London (La Galleria, Royal Opera Arcade, Pall Mall, October 13-16, 2011). I was there, showing my “LACER/ACTIONS” project (images from torn posters and city walls). With me, almost 200 artists coming from Australia, Japan, Italy, Israel, Chile, Canada, Denmark, Georgia, France, Germany, India, Finland, Czech Republic, Greece, Poland, UK, USA, Sudan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Sicily, UAE (Dubai), Lebanon, Netherlands, Belgium. It was a great opportunity to share experiences and ideas. And to plan the future… I met fellow artists and I had the way to approach different expressions of their art. And to know something more about their life. Here are some stories…

The first artist I had the pleasure to meet at Parallax AF was MIIKA NYYSSÖNEN from Helsinki, Finland. We hanged artworks at the wall at the same time, in the afternoon. Miika brought to London three works, three delicious paintings-mosaics. But those artworks were only a little part of his huge artistic activity.

Miika is an installation artist. As he showed me through his tablet, his works are often hybrids of several ways to do art, in his recent works he’s been interested in combining visual decisions made by computer programs to the handwork and painting done by himself. Nyyssönen often builds the situation or the structure which determines what his work’s appearance will be. Miika Nyyssonen used cardboard as the main component in his interactive Olin Hall Gallery installation ‘M the Machine’. 700 cardboard boxes were cut according to ten different models, each surface containing between one and ten square holes that provide partial views of other interior spaces and of three sets of home movies from three decades as the viewer moves within the work, simulating the workings of memory. He has his own page on ArtSlant.com network. As me.

 Just in front of me, AMY MCDONALD exhibited her beautiful artwork communicating poetry and smooth emotions. She loves doing screenprint using graphite, ink drawing, pencil drawing, collage. The effects are really awsome. Amy has recently Graduated in Fine Arts from the University of Northampton, specialising in Printmaking and Drawing. In her works, she is particularly interested in the way in which imagery can be manipulated and represented in an abstract form as an artistic expression. Her recent Exhibitions included Free Range (London – July 2011) and University of Northampton degree show (June 2011). She says: “My artwork is about imaging my world around me. The styles vary, depending on the landscapes and influences I experience.”

Other my “wall neighbour” was NICHOLA DOHERTY, who showed at Parallax her brilliant works. She started out painting the Australian landscape, focusing on the outback, and the work was quite abstract. As her art evolved and she moved into the more urban influence of Paris, her work became more realistic. However, it remains stylised and focused on capturing the essence of Paris rather than a photo realistic portrayal. This style remained when she moved back to Australia and once more began painting country landscapes and also again when she returned to France and Paris. Nichola is currently drawing on inspiration from his life in France and also a recent trip to the Scottish Highlands. She says: “I am continuing to explore the essence of the landscape and world around me and to draw on my personal experiences in different landscapes and countries.”

I knew another Australian artist: DEBORAH ALEXANDER. Behind her art there is the inner world of a woman who really suffered in the first years of the life. She wrote about herself: “My father had no concept of family and my mother very few boundaries… home life was often unsetting and disturbing”. Deborah found in art a new life, a new reason to hope. She has engaged in painting most of her life, but it wasn’t until she was in her forties and her children old enough that she managed to study Fine Art to Honours Degree Level at Suffolk College (2005) and MA Fine Art at Norwich School of Art and Design (2007). Her paintings are a sort a trip on the dreams. They seemed to me as nice caresses for heart and soul. Deborah Alexander is working out of Newbourne Studios (Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) where a gallery showcases contemporary paintings for interiors. Deborah Alexander was Artist in Residence in Ipswich Hospital‘s Diagnostic Imaging Department (2006) and has created Artwork for both Ipswich Hospital and East Suffolk MIND.

 

During Parallax AF days we had the way “to be on stage” with Berlin-based artist MIRIAM WUTTKE. She presented an interesting performance: “Embracing the Animal Mind” from the series “Dress to Kill-The end of Post Colonialism”. The piece revolved around anxiety and existential fears in post-colonialist societies and systems; the notion of losing control over a well constructed and preserved individualised life, as well as the need to regain a lost simplicity and innocence in the face of global discomfort on a per diem basis. “The embracement of the animal mind,” explains Wuttke, “is a poetic metaphor for the satisfaction of an elementary need. The performance reflects a process of retreat in order to overcome archaic, magical and cognitive thinking to find relief in a faunal counterpart…” The performance taked place all along the gallery of the Royal Opera Arcade.

Miriam lives and works in Berlin and New York where she worked on paintings, performances and installations. The pictorial research of Miriam Wuttke is developed from figurative wood and paper (1992-1997), painting of abstract expressionism (1997-2009). Miriam Wuttke performs mostly in performance within its own facilities “site specific”. Her installations too are “site-specific”. They consist of objects, collages, fragile, objets trouvés, ready-mades, manuscripts, paintings, drawings and video installations.

 Another performance showed BETH JERVIS creativity and artistic expression. Beth – Paris-based artist – performed “A Banal Poem about a Man”, consisting of four poems and audio recordings woven together in relation to her two-dimensional work exhibited in Parallax AF, “Business Plan to End Capitalism”. She describes one of her numerous costumes during the performance as: “a projection of our idea that there is a beautiful other, trying to embody the beauty through norms rather than asking ourselves what makes us truly happy. Exuberance, success, drawn back through the vulnerability of the alternate other. We see the character and see something in the other and we see it in them but we realise we are as foolish as the character not to see it in our selves, just because the character is painted as a fool to have been all those things at once and not realised there is very little importance in the difference between those things, when it is a simple human being that is portraying them.”

 Impossible not to see, at Parallax AF, the incredible cracked paintings by JEAN MARC ISERE, from Asnière sur Seine (France). His work does not arise from an intellectual stand but from a confrontation with the erosion of matter as such. Jean Marc says: “The cracked paintings allow the gaze, beyond the figurative proposition barely outlined in the foreground, to be freed from rational given and handed over the luminescence of the background”. As Jean Marc says, the spectator become s the agent of the work and ties up once more with his vital force”.

 I had the opportunity to admire SAM PEACOCK works. He uses a mix of recycled metals and industrial paints to create landscape pieces. He gorges on the speed and power of mark making, the rawness and the ferocity of paint; how brush marks shift, scrape and overlap to build up structures and forms which compel him to paint. He looks incisively for the conversation within the form to build this up on the canvass as the work evolves. Sam ‘s painting is rooted in the abstract but links to landscape and architecture within the built environment. Colours become forged from the dilapidated wastelands of the industrial North and regenerated urbanized sprawls, right through the space of farmlands in Australia and the hectic communities within Thailand. The surfaces are constructed using a variety of rollers and industrial paints, the underlying textures show forms and motifs where the ideas all began.

At Parallax AF, just in front on my wall, on the right, AMY WRIGHT has presented her beautiful and fascinating works, that tell us some fragments of her path in the artistic life. Amy studied Arts Therapy at the University of Derby where she first began to really explore the use of oil paints. After a short hiatus starting in 1999, Amy returned to painting in 2003, inspired by living in Greenwich, London. She joined a network of artists at the Cor Blimey Art Studios in Deptford in 2005 and further continued her explorations into colour and texture. In 2006 Amy moved to San Francisco. She had a studio in Russian Hill and became a part of the Artist Community, participating in a number of exhibitions. Since moving back to the UK in 2008, Amy found new inspiration in the vibrancy and chaoticness of the London (Space Studios) until recently moving to the Kent Countryside, enjoying the more tranquil and breathtaking influence that has to offer.

Working in the Abstract Expressionistic style, Amy is influenced by emotions, people, surroundings as well as artists such as Hans Hoffman, Mark Rothko, and Philip Guston. As seen at Parallax, Amy explores the use of colour and texture. Her work is emotive and reflective, and allows the viewer to interpret through their own experiences, memories and feelings. She works in oils, the ideal medium to create the impasto texture that gives depth to her Art. Her favourite colour? Blue.

 

I was really ashtonished by DAPHNE HUGHES Art, for certain aspects so close to my kind of artworks. Daphne is working in the South East of England in Leighton Buzzard,Bedfordshire. She is a Contemporary Artist creating large Abstract paintings based on her Photography. She loves to exploring the minute details of surfaces inherent in objects that surround us. She captures images and exposes their complex surface textures, observing and translating these qualities into paintings. She uses to create large scale fabrications of texture or movement. Each painting is unique and original with strong visual qualities, and by their nature create a tactile response by the use of mixed and diverse mediums.

Daphne worked on a series of large paintings inspired by the discarded object and corroded materials in the environment. She interprets and captures the spirit of their unconventional displacement and existence into paintings in her own unique style. Her works reflect an enhanced physical version intensifying the original qualities. Daphne Hughes says: “As a passionate Artist I am focused on my forthcoming project which will be a series of individual original Abstract paintings of the surface qualities of ancient fishing boats of Bali,Indonesia and the centuries of worn paint.” “Regenerations” was the title of the works showed at Parallax AF. Daphne published a book in which she tells her incredibile journey trough Art.

 I was also captured by MARTINA KOLLE paintings. Martina – who divides her time between Italy and Germany, exhibiting in both countries as well as Turkey and the United States – works between the regions of the abstract and the representational where only myths and symbols reside. Having practiced homeopathic therapy for over 15 years, Kolle draws upon her own inner resources to give life and vitality to an art that, in the end, is always her own. Her signs and symbols sit outside of our regional languages to form a universal, pictorial grammar only accessible through intuition. Some works pay homage to Georgia O’Keefe’s quivering slips of line that flatten out into organic symmetries. We also see the muscular and assertive hard-line geometries of Joseph Stella’s late paintings. Moving past the feminine and masculine, Kolle’s pictures evade category while offering enough familiarity to be arresting. Her intensely saturated yellows, reds, and blues swirl into vortices, drip with gravity, and expand into an ethereal openness like light reflecting off mist.

Martina Kolle says: “During my long-lived therapeutical experiences as a homeopath, balance has always been my main topic, especially its effects on the human spirit, body and soul. My oil on canvas paintings are compensators. Every topic, the colours and composition of each single painting, are given to me in quiescence and are then transferred onto canvas.”

 Parallax AF gave me the pleasure to meet Czech born artist DAGMAR DOST-NOLDEN, who participated at the Biennale di Venezia “Creative Room” (2009) and Third International Forum in Bolognano, at Casa dell’Arte founded by Lucrezia De Domizio Durini. International artist-painter, sculptor and performer, Dagmar Dost-Nolden – who lives in Cologne, Germany – is fascinated by different forms of energy. Nearly all her paintings, sculptures, objects, installations and performances relate to this subject. Energy is streaming and changing, and art follows the same principle. She considers that art is not a static subject, but interacts with its surroundings. Architecture, nature, people, everything is influencing each other, changing not only the view, but also thoughts and thinking processes.

Not belonging in any of the strong art opinions she has developed her own art. It arisese out of an idea as well as an inspiration during the painting process. Both, the idea, spirit and the energy are being included. She says: “Human being, so as everything others too, is only a small part of free streaming energy that is forming all the universe”. Dagmar has been acknowledged in plenty of exhibitions in many countries. This year she participated at Art Fair Shanghai and Art Fair Beijing.

 I like also to mention artworks by DAVID ABSE, KIMBAL QUIST BUMSTEAD, MATTJ FLETCHER, KIMBERLY JEAN WEBB, SOREN MAYES, SUE SKITT, COLIN PEARCE, and the four Polish Artists MARLENA PROMNA, TOMASZ PIETREK, HANNA SLIWINSKA, ANDREI RAFALOWICZ.

 

 By Roberto Alborghetti

(reporter, author, visual artist, photographer)

 

HERE’S TO YOUR (AND YOUR PROJECT’S) HEALTH

 

 

By Michelle LaBrosse, PMP®, Chief Cheetah and Founder of Cheetah Learning, and Kristen LaBrosse, Co-Author, CAPM®

It is a basic concept, but it is something that many of us have forgotten how to achieve in our ever-busier lives. It is a frame of mind that can be all too quickly brushed aside in the name of efficiency, career advancement, or other obligations. What is this illusive concept that I am referring to? WELLNESS!

Wellness has been on the backburner for many professionals striving to make

careers for themselves in their chosen profession. These people may have been under the notion that in order to be the best they had to give up their personal needs. Things like rest, exercise, and time with family and friends were thrown by the wayside in order to reap the benefits of hard work in a career. Finally, there is a new wave of individuals who are challenging this way of life and are claiming their rights to wellness.

I recently received an email from Mike Lamitola, PMP®. Mike wrote to me in

appreciation of Cheetah’s article, published in the Cheetah PHAST Magazine

(www.cheetahphast.com), entitled “Wellness Buddies.” Here is part of what Mike had to say: “I went through the Cheetah Exam Prep course with Jeff Allen and was so impressed that Cheetah used nutrition and basic yoga/breathing exercises to help increase alertness and mental clarity. After 12 years working in the construction industry and living the business professional life I’ve had some eye opening experiences and have seen some serious struggles with fellow coworkers. I became such a huge advocate for health and wellness that I decided it was time to move in a new direction that was calling me.”

Mike’s new direction was to enter the wellness profession as a Health Coach/Nutrition Counselor through a company that he and his wife started called “Welcome to Wellness!” (welcometowellnessnow.com). In his website, Mike says: ”Life is a series of projects. Some big, some small and some all happening at the same time. We need to make time within these projects to focus on our well being.”

So, how do you make time to maintain your health to ensure that you are successful in all of your endeavors, including being the best project manager you can be? The good news is that a lot of the same ideals that are followed to maintain optimum health can be translated to project success. Follow the tips below to achieve ultimate health, for you and your projects.

Plan for Longevity. How many of you start a project, planning on failure? If you do that, you will be out of a job quicker than you can say “negative Nick.” Likewise, when you begin a wellness plan, you need to think about the future you, 10 years down the road, and have positive expectancy. What activities and habits can you form today that will benefit your wellbeing? What activities can you eliminate that will ultimately cause harm? In order to enhance the quality of your life, realize that every day counts toward your wellness goals, and set up your day-to-day actions with the mindset of achieving a lifetime of healthy living.

While projects are usually shorter than a lifetime, the same philosophy applies. While working on your project day-in and day-out, keep your end goal in mind. Don’t let daily hiccups deter you from your project’s end goal. When you plan for longevity you give yourself, and your projects, a life force that can pull you, and your projects, through hard times.

Live in the Moment. Being present with our surrounding and ourselves is easier said than done. When there is all that noise running through your mind, you may find yourself saying, “Excuse me, what did you say?” far too often. An important part of your wellness is to be present in each and every moment, because the past events and future possibilities are inconsequential compared to what is happening in the here and now.

This practice can be greatly beneficial to the projects you work on as well. Instead of getting lost in the anxiety that can comes with worrying about what might go wrong in the project tomorrow, or how stupid that mistake was that you made yesterday, focus on the task at hand and what needs to get done today. By being fully present in your project tasks, you are better able to perform them correctly with clarity and confidence.

Stakeholder Buy-In. As a project manager, you are the master of communicating with stakeholders and ensuring the project you are working on is meeting the needs of the various stakeholders in order to get their buy-in. Use these same skills in your wellness project, and treat yourself as the primary stakeholder. Analyze what your needs and wants are to maintain your wellness goal, and recognize other stakeholders that might be involved with you achieving wellness. For example, your stakeholder might be your significant other, and the buy-in might be to cook dinner every other night so that you can work out after you get home from work. When you get buy-in from all stakeholders, you have set up their expectations of you appropriately, and are more likely to achieve your wellness goals.

Celebrate Progressive Achievements. When you have achieved a wellness goalcelebrate! After all, you worked hard for it, and will be more motivated to achieve greater states of wellness if you take the time to acknowledge your efforts and awesomeness. This is also true for your project team. When your team members, either individually or as a group, accomplish a major project milestone, don’t let it go by unnoticed. Celebrating intermittent achievements fuels the fire for the entire project.

After you read this article, take a moment to evaluate your own wellness goals and how you are achieving them. If you are not where you want to be in terms of wellness, find out what the specific barriers are that are keeping you from getting there. You are, after all, a resourceful project manager that procures resources when needed, manages and communicates with important stakeholders, and brings a project from start to successful finish. Use your skills today for the biggest project of your life: your wellness project.

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Michelle LaBrosse, PMP, is an entrepreneurial powerhouse with a penchant for making success easy, fun, and fast. She is the founder of Cheetah Learning, the author of the Cheetah Success Series, and a prolific blogger whose mission is to bring Project Management to the masses. Cheetah Learning is a virtual company with 100 employees, contractors, and licensees worldwide. To date, more than 30,000 people have become “Cheetahs” using Cheetah Learning’s innovative Project Management and accelerated learning

techniques. Recently honored by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), Cheetah Learning was named Professional Development Provider of the Year at the 2008 PMI® Global Congress. A dynamic keynote speaker and industry thought leader, Michelle was previously recognized by PMI as one of the 25 Most Influential Women in Project Management in the world. Michelle’s articles have appeared in more than 100 publications and Web sites around the world. Her monthly column, the Know How Network is carried by more than 400 publications, and her monthly newsletter goes out to more than 50,000 people. She is a graduate of the Harvard Business School’s Owner President Manager’s (OPM) program and also holds engineering degrees from Syracuse University and the University of Dayton.

 

Check out Cheetah PHAST – a great new quarterly magazine:

http://www.cheetahphast.com/?page_id=17