IHEAP (BIENNALE DE PARIS): 20 STUDENTS WANTED TO INVESTIGATE CRUCIAL ISSUES OF ART IN 21ST CENTURY

LE LOUVRE, PARIS – PHOTO BY ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

In 1983, the Mayor of Paris, Jacques Chirac, gave Pontus Hulten the task of creating a graduate school for research in contemporary art. Its antecendents were to be the Weimer Bauhaus School and Black Mountain College in the U.S., and it was meant to function as an alternative to Paris’s École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts. The Institut des hautes études en arts plastiques (Iheap) offers participants a course of study where they can free themselves from the inherited art history of the 20th century, by investigating crucial issues of art in the 21st Century, an ongoing history in which the participants will eventually take part.

IHEAP is the Education section of the Biennale de Paris. The programme presupposes an intellectual orientation to which it is desirable, but not indispensable, to adhere. The Institute is open to all those who have an interest in singular and extreme practices which currently and sporadically appear in the art world and elsewhere. Iheap is for those who want to change their artistic practice or professional activity, for those who after several years of art school want to break free of alienated learning, who expect more from a school than a framework for artistic production, for those who reject art as it is commonly practiced, and finally for those who wish to work on essential issues in intimate and experimental conditions.

Only twenty students a year are chosen to study at Iheap. The course of study is completed in two years (or sessions). The first year is composed of two ten-week cycles, three half-days each week, dedicated to a single theme. The second year is dedicated to the creation of an investigative text of thirty pages, without illustrations. Its purpose is to demonstrate the development of the participant’s research. The development of this document will be carefully followed by Iheap’s staff. Study at Iheap is equivalent to a post-graduate degree. The application fee is 65 euros. Tuition is 2000 euros for the first year, 500 euros for the second, payable in one or two installments. Financial assistance is available.

More informations:

Institut des hautes études en arts plastiques (Iheap), Biennale de Paris, Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild, 11 rue Berryer,  75008 Paris, Tél. : +33 (0)1 4534 3004, http://iheap.fr

NEW CLIP: “COLORS MACHINE” / JONTEKNIK MUSIC + ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI ART

***

 Jonteknik soundtrack (“Music Machine”) goes with Roberto Alborghetti Lacer/actions Art – Realistic Images of Decomposed and Torn Posters. Colors and electro music for a compelling sensorial experience… One minute of pure fun in an HD videoclip.

Based in Brighton (UK) writer, producer and remixer, Jonteknik (Jon Russell) has also co-written with Paul Humphreys (OMD) and Claudia Brucken.

http://www.jonteknikmusic.com/

ART AND MEDIA #3 / PROMOTING MY “COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE “ SHOW: THE OFFICIAL POSTER, THE PLAYBILL AND THE FLYER ABOUT SILK SCARVES LIMITED-EDITION

“COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE

THE DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS”

SHOW 2012

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI AT ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS (XIII CENTURY)

MOUNT AMIATA, TUSCANY – ITALY

The Official Poster

*

 “COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE

THE DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS”

SHOW 2012

The Playbill

*

COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE

THE DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS”

SHOW 2012

The Flyer about Limited-Edition Silk Scarves  On Dislay at “Colors Of An Apocalypse” Show

 

 

“UNMONDODITALIANI” (INTERNATIONAL DAILY MAGAZINE) WRITES ABOUT “COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE” SHOW AT ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS IN TUSCANY

The international daily magazine “Un mondo d’italiani” – directed by Mina Cappussi (editor in chief, writer and professor at La Sapienza University in Rome) has dedicated an article to my next show “Colors Of An Apocalypse / The Decomposed Publicity Posters” at Rocca Aldobrandesca (XIII Century) in Tuscany, Italy, from October 6 to November 4, 2012. Article by reporter Serena Lastoria. I’d like to share it on my WordPress blog. Here’s the link:

http://www.unmondoditaliani.com/colori-di-unapocalissela-decomposizione-dei-manifesti-pubblicitari-alborghetti-in-mostra-a-siena.htm

“FRAGMENTS OF AN ANGEL’S WING”…BUT IT’S ONLY A DETAIL OF A DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTER – LACER/ACTIONS POSTCARDS # 15

*

Fragments Of An Angel’s Wing”

LaceR/Actions Project

Realistic and not manipulated image

Canvas/Mixed media, 68×46

Location: Amsterdam, 2012

*

Roberto Alborghetti ‘s LaceR/Actions is a multidisciplinary project and research about the apparent chaos of ripped and decomposed posters and urban/street signs.

Transferred on canvas, reproduced on lithographs or textiles (as pure silk), or scanned in videoclips, the details of torn posters give new life to paper lacerations and decomposition, as you may see in this “postcard” reproducing one of the 40.000 images captured by Roberto Alborghetti during his research all around the world.

This image  (reproduced on canvas) will be exhibited during the next Roberto Alborghetti Show (“Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”) takin’ place at Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany, from October 6 to November 4, 2012 .

COLORS & TANGOS (IN THE NIGHT) – VERSES BY MEREDITH DEERHEART, ARTWORK BY ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

*

Verses by Meredith Deerheart + Roberto Alborghetti artwork (from his Lacer/actions Project, Images of torn and decomposed posters). 

Soundtrack: “Montreal” by KJ Sawka

More at:

http://healingminds.wordpress.com/2012/05/16/the-rest-of-the-story/

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2012/05/11/dreams-laceractions-therapeutical-haiga-1-by-meredith-and-roberto-alborghetti/

“PILGRIMAGE” EXHIBITION: DISCOVERING THE SLOW TRAVEL AT MUSEUM DER KULTUREN IN BASEL (SWITZERLAND)

 

The Museum der Kulturen in Basel (Switzerland) opened its “Pilgrimage” exhibition (September 14 – March 3, 2013) dedicated to the rediscovery of slow travel. People began wandering many centuries ago in search of inner peace, truth and contemplation. The reasons why people should embark on such gruelling endeavours are many and varied, and it seems that religion is not necessarily the prime motive. What all pilgrims have in common, however, is related to a search, in the widest sense of the term.

The fact that journeyers often report a sense of revitalization led Europe curator Dominik Wunderlin to devote an exhibition to the subject: “The subject of pilgrimage is inevitably bound up with the Way of St. James. There are many other paths which lead to a holy place. The exhibition shows that Europe is also interlaced with pilgrimage routes, representing an awe-inspiring heritage. We need to treasure them”, says Wunderlin.

Many roads lead to Rome. The exhibition is not exclusively devoted to the Way of St. James. A starting point is Jerusalem in the Holy Land, which is Europe’s earliest sacred destination. Visitors experience what pilgrims from the Middle Ages would have gone through and their motivation for doing so. At the same, time they see what a modern-day journey involves and what inspires people today to take such a step. The various displays illuminate subjects such as preparation and departure, pilgrim saints, customs, symbols, destinations, arts and crafts and the trades that benefit from pilgrimage, etc. The focal point will be exhibits from the last few centuries, which lure the visitor into a world of beliefs that today appears alien and curious. The exhibition takes an impressive look at the cultural and historical background giving rise to the current resurgence in interest in modern-day pilgrimages. The exhibition continues through March 3, 2013.

MUSEUM DER KULTUREN IN BASEL

THE YOGI NEGOTIATOR

By Michelle LaBrosse, PMP®, Chief Cheetah and Founder of Cheetah Learning, and Kristen LaBrosse, CAPM®, Co-Author

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – LACER/ACTIONS PROJECT – IMAGES OF TORN PUBLICITY POSTERS – LITHOGRAPH, 50X70, 2008, FRAMED

Take a calming deep breath and maintain focus on the matter at hand. Find your center and stay balanced, calm, and ready. Now, tell me, are you on a Yoga mat or in a boardroom preparing to negotiate? The reality is that the techniques learned in Yoga can be applied across a broad spectrum of areas, especially in stressful situations such as negotiating.

Yoga requires you to maintain a calm state of being while putting your body under stress. This same physical stress can arise when you are negotiating an important deal. When you learn how to find your inner Yogi in these times of distress, you will be a better negotiator and therefore develop better relationships with whom you are negotiating. Here are some specific ways that you can utilize your Yogi powers to become a better negotiator.

Know Thyself. OK, so you might be thinking—I know myself. I know what I like, what I dislike. I spend 24 hours 7 days a week with myself—how could I NOT know myself?

In Yoga, knowing yourself goes far deeper than what we typically think of as self-awareness. Yogis attest that many of us live with a personal case of “mistaken-identity.” We think that who we are is our job, what car we drive, our likes and dislikes, our education, our amazing sense of humor, and so forth. This type of surface awareness does not take us far when it comes to resolving conflict or solving problems, which are key skills needed to be a good negotiator.

You can tackle the task of getting to know yourself on a deeper level by pretending that you are getting to know a new person. The key is to not assume that you know everything there is to know about yourself. Within your subconscious there is an entire realm of “you” with certain tendencies, self-talk and life theories that you might not even be fully aware of. When you become better acquainted with yourself, you will not only be more self-sensitive, but you will be able to connect to other people better and in a more compassionate way.

Find Your Balance. Yoga practice aims for balance in the body, mind, and soul. For example, assertive is the balance between the aggressive and passive extremes. Deliberate action is the balance between fight or flight reactions. When we are balanced in life, we feel happy, at peace, and content.

When you are negotiating, you can feel the balance of power shifting in the room like a ping-pong ball. Negotiation is a delicate game of balance, where the best outcome is an equilibrium reached when both parties feel balanced and satisfied. Because we live in the real world, this doesn’t always happen easily. If you’re in an unbalanced negotiation situation, where one party has more power than the other, the weaker party still has a chance to get what they want if they strive for balance.

In negotiations there is often real power (physical assets, knowledge capital) and perceived power (authoritative demeanor, quick wit). If you do find yourself at a disadvantage in comparison with the other party in one of these powers, work on increasing your power in the other area to arrive at a better-balanced negotiating situation.

Take a Deep Breath. One of the biggest ways you can lose your cool in a negotiations setting is by responding emotionally rather than objectively. We are all humans, and it is normal to have an emotional reaction, especially in a situation that has turned negative.

If the other party is evoking negative emotions from you by not “playing nice,” remember your inner Yogi and take a deep breath. When you control the flow of your breathing, your heart rate is effectively slowed down, bringing your body and mind back to a calm place that allows a clear mind. This allows you to release all the adrenaline that the other party may have induced.

When you take a breath instead of automatically responding out of emotion, you regain rational thinking and take back control. Having control over your responses is so important for good negotiations—so don’t forget to breathe!

Non-Reactive Presence and Deliberate Action. One important practice in Yoga is attaining the mindset of non-reactive presence. What this means is that you are present in the moment, and not reacting in an automatic way to external stimuli. Yogis strive to simply witness actions around them as well as the emotions that these actions evoke, rather than being subjected to these emotions. This separation allows for deliberate action rather than a reactionary response.

While it might sound all well and easy to remain non-reactive while reading this article, the real challenge is to remain non-reactive when you feel you’ve been personally attacked. This can happen many times in negotiations as people lash out to try to get what they want. When this happens, find your inner Yogi, the one that is compassionate and knows that others actions are not about you at all, and come back to your place of being present and calm where you can go forward with deliberate action.

So the next time you go into an important negotiation, leave your Yoga mat and towel at home, but bring along your inner Yogi to obtain a resolution that everyone is happy with. Also, don’t forget to ask about Cheetah Learning’s Masters Certificate in Negotiations (www.cheetahlearning.com, 888-659-2013) to become a Zen master at Negotiations. Thank you for reading, and Namaste!

About the Author:

Michelle LaBrosse, PMP, is an entrepreneurial powerhouse with a penchant for making success easy, fun, and fast. She is the founder of Cheetah Learning, the author of the Cheetah Success Series, and a prolific blogger whose mission is to bring Project Management to the masses.

Cheetah Learning is a virtual company with 100 employees, contractors, and licensees worldwide. To date, more than 30,000 people have become “Cheetahs” using Cheetah Learning’s innovative Project Management and accelerated learning techniques.  

Recently honored by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), Cheetah Learning was named Professional Development Provider of the Year at the 2008 PMI® Global Congress. A dynamic keynote speaker and industry thought leader, Michelle was previously recognized by PMI as one of the 25 Most Influential Women in Project Management in the world.

Michelle’s articles have appeared in more than 100 publications and websites around the world. Her monthly column, the Know How Network, is carried by over 400 publications, and her monthly newsletter goes out to more than 50,000 people. 

She is a graduate of the Harvard Business School’s Owner President Manager’s (OPM) program and also holds engineering degrees from Syracuse University and the University of Dayton. 

ART & GEOMETRY FOR TEXTILE DESIGNS: AT “PARIS INDIGO” THE NEXT FASHION AND FABRIC TRENDS TO OVERCOME THE CRISIS

© BRUNO BOGGIA DISEGNI, ITALY – © Photos by ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

*

There’re also some geometric shapes and topics – such as those presented in this photo-gallery – in the new textile collection that  Bruno Boggia Studio (Como, Italy) displays from today in Paris at “Première Vision” of Indigo Salon (September 19-21, 2012,  Paris-Nord Villepinte). Lucia and Bruno Boggia, along with their collaborators, participate to the famous Parisian event bringing a range of novelty already appreciated in different parts of the world. Bruno Boggia Studio created beautiful limited-edition silk scarves with my torn poster images…  

BRUNO BOGGIA DISEGNI, ITALY – PHOTO BY ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

In Paris they propose designs and fabrics which  anticipate the next fashion trends. The Indigo Salon is traditionally considered the “first vision” of what is going to happen to the world-fashion. The Paris Show puts on display ideas and suggestions for the next catwalks and pret-a-porter fashion shows, trying to overcome the effects of the market crisis. Best wishes for a speedy recovery are also coming from the Bruno Boggia Studio’s colorful proposals which focuse on the most effective colors, combining tradition and innovation. As shown in this pics, where geometry suggests ideas and emotions to textiles.  

“OUT OF BRITAIN” EXHIBITION: FOR THE FIRST TIME IN KUWAIT 52 ARTWORKS BY BRITISH ARTISTS

A private view opened yesterday (September 17, 2012) in Kuwait “Out of Britain” exhibition showing artworks from the British Council collection (organization: The British Council, Contemporary Art Platform and the National Council for Culture Arts and Letters). The show continues through October 25th bringing together, for the first time in Kuwait, 52 key-artworks selected from the British Council Collection. Spanning a period of almost one hundred years of creativity by significant British artists, the works on display take as a common theme the landscapes of the British Isles.

Structured around an imagined journey the display begins in the city and lead out into the countryside to follow the coastline before ultimately returning to an urban landscape. The works in the show illustrate individual artist’s attempts to find their place amongst an ever-changing environment where they are often driven to challenge traditional ways of interpreting and framing the landscape.

In parallel to the “Out of Britain” the British Council in collaboration with CAP Kuwait, will host “Landscapes Expanded”, a programme of events and lectures that will explore the themes of landscape in different art forms. David Rayson, featured artist in “Out of Britain”, will be the first to present a lecture about his work ( September 18, 7pm, The Museum of Modern Art, Kuwait). Rayson’s work relates directly to the visual potential of the everyday, enabling the ordinary to be realised as fantastic. David Rayson was appointed professor and head of Painting at the Royal College of Art in 2006. He is a practising artist, tutor and curator and his work has been exhibited widely in the UK and internationally. His work is included in major collections including the Tate, Whitechapel Art Gallery, British Council, Deutsche Bank, Rubell Family Collection and Contemporary Art Society.

 *

http://visualarts.britishcouncil.org/whats-on/exhibition/11/15945

 *

 Photo: David Rayson, from Ashmore Park to Wednesfield : “The Jet Bench”