SPRINT AFTER YOUR GOALS AT CHEETAH SPEED

 

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – LACER/ACTIONS PROJECT – IMAGES OF TORN AND DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS – 2010

 

By Michelle LaBrosse, PMP®, Chief Cheetah and Founder of Cheetah Learning, and Kristen Medina, CAPM®, Co-Author

 

Imagine yourself at the starting line, stretching and flexing and         making sure that your shoes are tied tight and that your winning bib  number is securely fastened. This is you, at the gate, achieving   your wildest dreams. As the starting gun sounds, you sprint to            action, with every muscle in your being toned and prepared to get   you to your end goal. As you race across the finish line, the crowd,    full of your friends and family, go wild, yelling your name and            congratulating you for your race of a lifetime. Now, come back to reality. How did that scenario make you feel? You just completed an amazing accomplishment with the support of friends and family; an accomplishment you were so passionate about that it compelled you to perform at your very best. Now imagine if every  goal you went after ended this way. It can happen when you pursue  your goals vigorously and passionately. Here are 10 ways to help you sprint towards your goals at Cheetah Speed.

 

1 – Make sure your goals are SMART. You have a big, hairy, audacious  goal—that is fantastic. Now how will you know when you’ve reached  that goal? When making a goal, ensure that it’s SMART, which  means: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Timely. When your goal is measurable, you can be held accountable for your  goal, and will be more likely to achieve it.

2 –  Don’t Limit Yourself with Limiting Beliefs. What are your limiting beliefs? If you’ve ever thought to yourself: “I’m unlucky,” or “I’m not the running type,” or “I’m a bad negotiator,” these are limiting beliefs, and they just aren’t true. Take a moment to take inventory of any limiting beliefs that may be holding you back from going after your goals. When you get rid of your limiting beliefs, you get rid of your limits.

3 – Visualize Your Goal. Just as you visualized finishing the sprint    just a few minutes ago—practice visualizing how you will feel when  you have accomplished your goal. See it in your mind—that is, see    yourself achieving the dream, whatever it is. Like passing the PMP  exam, or having happy children, a very successful career, your         dream house, a very in-shape body—whatever your dream is. Think   and feel how awesome it is you achieved your dream for a few  seconds… (1,2,3)… Amazing right?

4 – Take Small Steps. One of the biggest things that can stop us in     our tracks is when the enormity of our goal paralyzes us. To prevent that, break your goal down into bite-size deliverables that can be accomplished every week, and decide when and where you will make time to accomplish that weekly goal.

5 – Make the Time. When is the last time that you sat down and focused on your goal, and only your goal, for 30 minutes straight without interruption? This is called timeboxing. Like a sprint, timeboxing  will help you cover a lot of ground in a short amount of time. Set a timebox for yourself today, and sprint towards your goal.

6 – Write it Down. You write out your grocery list, your “to do” list,   your guest list—what about your GOAL list? According to a study    done by Dave Kohl, a Virginia Tech professor, people who regularly  write down their goals earn nine times as much over their lifetime   as people who don’t. What goals can you put on your goal list             today?

7 – Learn to say “NO.” Say it with me: “NO!” Now get used to saying  this word over and over again. Why is the word “No” so important?  If you always say “Yes” when asked to do something, you are giving  away your time, your resources, and your talents. Say “No” in order to create the time and space you need to go for your goals.

8 – Get Psyched. Napoleon Hill, in his book “Think and Grow Rich,” said: “The starting point of all achievement is desire. Keep this constantly in mind. Weak desires bring weak results, just as a    small amount of fire makes a small amount of heat.” What goal      ignites your desire? What gets you over-the-top psyched? Get that  feeling towards achieving your goals and watch how fast you can              turn your dreams into reality.

9 – Get in the Driver’s Seat. YOU are the driving force in reaching     your goals. While others can help you, no one can do it for  you.     This means that you cannot live in your circle of concern and            worry about what you can’t control and how that is preventing you   from achieving your dreams. Focus on what you CAN control, and    steer yourself in the direction that you need to go to successfully complete your goal. No one will do it for you—embrace the driving force inside you so you can race towards your goal today.

10 – Today is the Day. There is a wise Chinese Proverb that says, “The  best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The next best time is  today.” Do you have a tree you’ve been meaning to plant, but stop  yourself because you are “too late”? The power of the present  should not be underrated. Plant your tree today and watch your     dreams grow, and do it TODAY.

 

We hope you are excited as we are about you racing towards your   goals today. On your mark, get set… GO!!!

 

About the Author:

 

Michelle LaBrosse, PMP, is an entrepreneurial powerhouse with a  penchant for making success easy, fun, and fast. She is the founder   of Cheetah Learning, the author of the Cheetah Success Series, and a prolific blogger whose mission is to bring Project Management to the masses. Cheetah Learning is a virtual company with 100 employees,  contractors, and licensees worldwide. To date, more than 50,000 people have become “Cheetahs” using Cheetah Learning’s innovative Project Management and accelerated learning techniques. Recently honored by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), Cheetah  Learning was named Professional Development Provider of the Year at   the 2008 PMI® Global Congress. A dynamic keynote speaker and  industry thought leader, Michelle was previously recognized by PMI as one of the 25 Most Influential Women in Project Management in the  world. Michelle’s articles have appeared in more than 100 publications and websites around the world. Her monthly column, the Know How Network, is carried by over 400 publications. She is a graduate of the Harvard Business School’s Owner President Manager’s (OPM) program and also holds engineering degrees from Syracuse University and the University of Dayton. 

 

 

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“MIRÓ! POETRY AND LIGHT”: IN GENOA (ITALY) 80 MASTERPIECES OF THE GREAT CATALAN ARTIST

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PHOTOS / COURTESY OF:

24 ORE Cultura – Gruppo 24 ORE Press Office

Palazzo Ducale Fondazione per la Cultura Press Office

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Palazzo Ducale in Genoa (Italy) is hosting, from 5 October 2012 to 7 April 2013, an exhaustive exhibition of the works of Joan Miró (1893–1983), the great Catalan artist who left his unmistakable mark on the European avant-garde art movements. This exhibition features over 80 works never before shown in Italy, including 50 surprisingly beautiful, large-format oil paintings, but also terracotta sculptures, bronzes and watercolours. The masterpieces that can be admired include the oil paintings Woman in the Street (1973) and Untitled (1978); bronzes such as Woman (1967); sketches including that for the mural for Harkness Commons-Harvard University, all from the Fundació Pilar y Joan Miró in Palma de Mallorca, which owns many works by the artist and has granted them on extraordinary loan for their Italian debut.

 

Sponsored by the Municipality of Genoa and the Palazzo Ducale Fondazione per la Cultura, the “Miró! Poetry and Light” exhibition has been produced and organized by the Arthemisia Group and 24 ORE Cultura – Gruppo 24 ORE in collaboration with the Fundació Pilar i Joan Miró and Ajuntamento De Palma De Mallorca. It is curated by María Luisa Lax Cacho, considered one of the worldʼs leading experts on Miró, who has wished to illustrate the last stage of the production of the artistʼs long life, when he finally made one of his great dreams come true in Majorca in 1956: a huge space of his own in which to work, protected by the peace and silence that only nature could offer him. On occasion of the exhibition Miróʼs long-desired studio will be wholly reconstructed within the gallery space.

 

 

THE ARTIST

Miró was born and grew up in Barcelona and attended La Llotja Academy of Fine Arts, where he studied under Modest Urgell and Josep Pascó. He started drawing when he was very young and his earliest oil painting to have survived is a landscape made in 1908. At 18 years old he exhibited his work at the 6th International Art Exhibition in Barcelona and the following year he started studying at the art college run by Francesc di Galí (1912–15), who taught him how to draw after having felt the model with his eyes closed.

He subsequently studied at the Círcol Artístic de Sant Lluc, where he drew nudes, circus performers and street and port scenes. The style of his early works was influenced by Impressionism, Fauvism, Futurism and Cubism. However, his first trip to Paris, in 1920, brought him closer to Dadaism and, subsequently, Surrealism.

In 1929 Miró married Pilar Juncosa in Palma de Mallorca, with whom he later had a daughter. The same period marked the start of his artistic experimentation, and he turned his hand to lithography, etching, sculpture and painting on tarpaper and glass. He increasingly sought the stimulating tranquillity of the countryside, and a place where he could freely dedicate himself to his work. Consequently, following the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War and a period of exile in France until 1942, he found refuge in Majorca, his motherʼs homeland.

In 1954 Miró left his home in Barcelona, moving permanently to Son Abrines in 1956, where he had arranged for the construction of his longed-for studio, which he commissioned from his close friend, the architect Josep Lluís Sert (Barcelona, 1902–83). In order to conserve this much loved property, which was a quintessential creative place for him, in 1980 Miró donated part of it to the city of Palma, and in 1981 the Fundació Pilar i Joan Miró was established. In 1954 Miró also won the Grand Prize for Graphic Work at the Venice Biennale, and in 1958 the Guggenheim International Award. However, he had to wait until his old age and the fall of Francoʼs regime before he received any

acknowledgements in Spain. Consequently, in 1978 he was awarded the Medalla dʼOr de la Generalitat de Cataluna; in 1979 the University of Barcelona awarded him an honorary degree (Harvard University had already done so in 1968); in 1980 he received the Gold Medal of Fine Arts from King Juan Carlos of Spain; and in 1983 Spain paid homage to him, with an event organized jointly by the Municipality of Barcelona, the Generalitat de Cataluna, the Ministry of Culture and the Fundació Joan Miró of Barcelona. He died soon after in Majorca and was buried in Barcelona, in Montjuïc cemetery.

 

THE EXHIBITION

The exhibition is divided chronologically and thematically in the rooms of the itinerary, where visitors can admire the production of Joan Miró during the last 30 years of his life in Majorca. The story of the master is inextricably bound up with this island that, as his own words convey, represented poetry and light for him.

From the outset of his career Miró maintained that the artistʼs objective should focus on large-scale projects, such as murals and other public art works, which also offered the opportunity to work together with architects and craftsmen, relegating easel paintings to a secondary role. Miróʼs public art projects, characterized by a combination of architecture and sculpture, derived in part from his deep admiration for Antoni Gaudí, are represented in the exhibition by works such as Sketch for the Mural of the Terrace Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati (1947) and Sketch for the Harkness Commons Graduate Center, Harvard University (1949–51), and the drawings for his Mural Project for the United Nations Building in New York (1952-1953).

Miró was in Palma from 1956 onwards, marking the beginning of an intense period of work that also led him to criticize his old sketches and paint over them. Among these paintings and drawings, the exhibition features the aforementioned oil painting from 1908, the earliest one by Miró to have survived, which the artist had covered during this purging. This untitled work thus became the recto of an oil painting made in 1960.

This period is also represented by another untitled work, an oil and acrylic on canvas depicting a figure, a sort of doll, in which the disappearance of the artist’s figurative style starts to become perceptible. During the 1960s and ʼ70s the images and titles of his works continue to refer to his favourite themes, such as women, landscapes and birds. However, the iconography becomes abstract and the figures are amplified. The coexistence of different styles and techniques gave rise to static works like Mosaic (1966) and others with confused brushstrokes, such as Poem (1966). It was also the period in which Miró set aside his easel and started painting on the floor, walking on his canvases and lying on them, creating sprays and drips, as in Untitled, also made in 1966, using oil, acrylic and black charcoal with red and blue marks.

The 1970s witnessed a series of monochrome landscapes, such as Untitled, painted in 1973, and other substantially monochromatic paintings like the large-format canvases and another series of five later oil paintings, made in 1978 and displayed in a single room, which are blurred, visionary, minimalist, evanescent and animated, and illustrate Miróʼs predilection for the black of the American abstract expressionists and Oriental calligraphy.

The artistʼs last years – when he painted with his fingers, applying colour with his fists, and got to grips with matter painting, spreading the impasto onto plywood, cardboard and recycled materials – are illustrated by works such as Figure, Bird (1976), an oil on glass-paper, wood and nails. The works with ethereal, modulated blue backgrounds, of which several examples are featured in the exhibition, including the intense Untitled (1978), also date from this period of his production.

Finally, it includes several sculptures that are the result of the experiments that the artist made during his lifetime with various materials and techniques, such as collage, object paintings and other works that, as the years progressed, were inspired by what he collected and that otherwise, as he himself wrote, “would be dead things or museum pieces”. The exhibition includes bronzes such as Woman (1966) and The Tightrope Walker (1969), assemblages like Figures (after 1973), which combines painting and sculpture and is directly descended from the object paintings of the 1930s, and terracotta sculptures, like the mask (Untitled, 1981) and the ceramic head (Untitled, 1981) that belong to a series of pieces that Miró made together with Hans Spinner, in Saint-Paul-de-Vence.

We have already noted the importance of the workplace for Miró which is why the Studio Sert in which he created some of his masterpieces has been reconstructed in the exhibition space. It includes all the objects, brushes and tools that Miró used, which have been preserved by the Fundació Pilar i Joan Miró. “The meeting between fantasy and control, prudence and generosity, which perhaps can be considered a feature of the Catalan mentality may explain, at least in part, the fundamental basis of the art and personality of Joan Miró,” Gillo Dorfles wrote in an essay on the Catalan artist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE SILK LACER/ACTIONS ON SHOW / ARTISTIC LIMITED-EDITION OF 3 PIECES FROM DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS IMAGES

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI SILK LACER/ACTIONS ON DISPLAY AT “COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE” SHOW AT ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS – SCARF #3 -” WIND OF MAY, RUFFLE MY THOUGHTS” – LIMITED-EDITION, PURE SILK CREPE DE CHINE, CREATED IN COLLABORATION WITH BRUNO BOGGIA STUDIO, COMO – ITALY

THE SILK “LACER/ACTIONS”

by ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

at “COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE” SHOW

The Decomposed Publicity Posters

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ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS

PIANCASTAGNAIO, SIENA – TUSCANY (ITALY)

OCTOBER 6- NOVEMBER 4, 2012

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The next big fashion trend”

Marina Chetner

(Blogger, New York, USA)

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“The outfit looks so elegant.

I truly feel like the most beautiful woman in the world”

Meredith Deerheart

(Photographer and Blogger, Indiana, USA)

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“Roberto’s art is unique…

He changes nothing, the colours are the same,

the image is the same,

but unrecognisable in the new form.”

Debra Kolkka

(Blogger, Brisbane, Australia)

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Pure Silk Scarves / Limited  edition – Crêpe de Chine – Three Images Series.

Created by Roberto Alborghetti for “Lacer/actions” Project (Images of torn posters and urban “signs”) in collaboration with Bruno Boggia Disegni (Como, Italy).

Sizes: width 63 cms, height 170 cms.

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WATCH THE CLIP OF THE SHOW/ YOUTUBE CHANNEL:

http://youtu.be/RFJb1XSTJbo

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INFO:

andrea@velar.it

ro.alb@alice.it

ART AND MEDIA #4 / PROMOTING MY “COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE” SHOW: THE OFFICIAL CATALOGUE (WEB VERSION, FREE DOWNLOAD)

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – DANCIN’ BRANCHES? – CANVAS/MIXED MEDIA, 70X50, 2012 – LACER/ACTIONS PROJECT (IMAGE OF DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTER AND URBAN SIGNS)

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“COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE

THE DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS”

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI 2012 SHOW

The Official Catalogue

(Web version, PDF Free Download)

COLORI DI UN’ APOCALISSE – COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE SHOW – Il Catalogo – The Catalogue

 

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Roberto Alborghetti Show – “Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”opened at the enchanting Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany (Italy)last October 6, 2012; the show continues through to November 4th , 2012.

The exhibition – displaced in seven rooms in an ascensional way – features 36 artworks (canvases, lithographs, a special collages series and a limited-edition of a three silk scarves) from Roberto Alborghetti Lacer/actions Projects (images of torn and decomposed publicity posters).

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Location: Aldobrandesca Fortress, Piancastagnaio, Siena, Tuscany (Italy); Opening Time: 10-12,30/17-19,30 (Saturday, Sunday and all public holidays; from October 23 to October 27 during “Penne e Video Sconosciuti” national events). For informations and visits by appointment: 039 0577 784134 ; e-mail: info@prolocopiancastagnaio.it.

THE CLIP (HD) FROM THE CASTLE: COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE SHOW / ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI AT ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS (TUSCANY)

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Roberto Alborghetti Show – “Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”opened at the enchanting Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany (Italy)last October 6, 2012; the show continues through to November 4th , 2012. The exhibition – displaced in seven rooms in an ascensional way – features 36 artworks (canvases, lithographs, a special collages series and a limited-edition of a three silk scarves) from Roberto Alborghetti Lacer/actions Projects (images of torn and decomposed publicity posters).

Promoted by:

PIANCASTAGNAIO MUNICIPALITY

OSA ONLUS

Sponsored by

PROVINCIA DI SIENA

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Location: Aldobrandesca Fortress, Piancastagnaio, Siena, Tuscany (Italy); Opening Time: 10-12,30/17-19,30 (Saturday, Sunday and all public holidays; from October 23 to October 27 during “Penne e Video Sconosciuti” national events). For informations and visits by appointment: 039 0577 784134 ; e-mail: info@prolocopiancastagnaio.it.

ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS, PIANCASTAGNAIO, SIENA, TUSCANY (ITALY) : THE ENCHANTING AND WONDERFUL LOCATION OF ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI 2012 SHOW

AN ARTIST IN A CASTLE IN TUSCANY – BY DEBRA KOLKKA

FELLOW BLOGGER DEBRA KOLKKA VISITED MY “COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE” SHOW AT ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS, IN TUSCANY. SHE POSTED THIS WONDERFUL REPORTAGE… THANK YOU SO MUCH DEBRA!

Bagni di Lucca and Beyond

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I have been following the blog of artist Roberto Alborghetti for some time and was delighted to find that there would be an exhibition of his work in the southern Tuscan town of Piancastagnaio. I need no further excuse to explore a Tuscan town and area I haven’t seen.

The exhibition is being held in the amazing La Rocca Aldobrandesca, an ancient castle in the beautiful hilltop town of Piancastagnaio.

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We arrived to find the doors to the castle closed so we wandered in the town for a while and returned in time to meet a charming Italian man heading for the entrance. It just happened to be Roberto, the artist……lucky us. He took us into the castle and we had a personal tour of the exhibition.

The works of art were on display on several floors of the castle. Come for a walk up the many steps, and meet…

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