SIGNS OF A CITY / REMEMBERING PARIS THROUGH COLORS BLOTS (FROM TORN AND DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS)

© ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – LACER/ACTIONS

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Fellow blogger Theadora Brack through her interesting blog People,Places and Bling kindly asked me about pics I shot in Paris a few years ago for my project “Lacer/actions” (Images of torn and decomposed publicity posters and urban tokens). I have just to say that also in Paris the traditional billboards have been replaced by electronic or plastic displays. It was not so easy to find them. But luck helps who dares… and who opens the doors of perception.

So, I had the way to capture some interesting images also in the French Capital. They were located in central areas, but not so visible to absent-minded passers-by. I took also some shots under the bridges, though the light conditions weren’t so good… In some tube stations I caught other images with nice shapes and colors blots: they seem to be a sort of elusive ghosts or mysterious tokens stolen from a beautiful city which wants to keep inside all its colored secrets… Et voilà mes images…

AND A BLOW-UP OF A CORROSION BECAME AN ABSTRACT IMAGE… LACER/ACTIONS POSTCARDS #24

 ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI - LACER/ACTIONS POSTCARDS #24

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WINDS BLOW/ THE SKY CLEARS/

BEFORE AN EMPTY MOON”

(Susan Kahn Verses, California, Usa)

CANVAS/MIXED MEDIA

63,5X40,5

2011

This image  (reproduced on canvas ) was displayed at Roberto Alborghetti Show (“Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”) in the  enchanting  Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany (Piancastagnaio, Siena, Italy) from October 6, 2012, to January 15, 2013.

This picture is the blow-up of a corrosion on a public display of publicity posters (image location: Benevento, Italy).

Inspiring verses by Susan Kahn from her “Empty Moon” poem. http://emptinesscafe.wordpress.com/2012/01/26/2527/

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Roberto Alborghetti ‘s LaceR/Actions is a multidisciplinary project and research about the apparent chaos of ripped and decomposed posters and urban/street signs.

Transferred on canvas, reproduced on lithographic prints or textiles (as pure silk), re-built on collages or scanned in videoclips, the details of torn and decomposed posters give new life to paper lacerations and matter decomposition, as you may see in this “postcard” reproducing one of the 40.000 images captured by Roberto Alborghetti during his research all around the world.

“ART AND POLITICS”: SHEPARD FAIREY (OBAMA “HOPE” POSTER CREATOR) MEETS STUDENTS AT “SANTA FE UNIVERSITY OF ART AND DESIGN”

Launched in 2011 by the Santa Fe University of Art and Design, Artists for Positive Social Change  is a “university-wide series of events, lectures, and performances that highlights one high-profile issue, artist or genre each year.” Inaugurating this five-year initiative, 2011-12 was the year of hip-hop and saw Public Enemy descend on the SFUAD campus for a free concert.  The school hosted a graffiti workshop alongside classes in writing rap lyrics, hip-hop music and breakdancing. The goal was to distill hip-hop as a significant form of communication, as an art form that at its inception “gave voice to voiceless people.” This first year of Artists for Positive Social Change also proved that SFUAD is kinda cool.

Now in its second year, the theme is “Art and Political Activism.” Behold Shepard Fairey, who came to campus last Sunday night (February 17, 2013) for a Q&A with SFUAD’s graphic design department chair, David Grey.  During the week of February 18, Fairey will also designed and painted a permanent outdoor mural on the school campus. This is the artist whose 1990s Andre the Giant sticker went viral before viral meant on the Internet.  It was a different kind of dissemination, one grounded in street art.  He created the sticker while attending the Rhode Island School of Design where his tendencies toward punk, skateboarding and other countercultures were sometimes disparaged by professors.  Fairey admitted that he never thought he’d be taken seriously as a fine artist. If he had, he alleged, it might have paralyzed him.

In 2008, Fairey designed Barack Obama’s Hope Poster, the very icon of Obama’s grassroots energy.  That poster is why Fairey typifies this year’s “art and political activism” theme.  Its impact was immense and although not officially affiliated with the presidential campaign, it alone must have mobilized hundreds of thousands of voters. In Fairey’s words, he is making art for the world he wants to live in.  That alone is inspiration for SFUAD artists.

The Hope Poster’s imagery evolved from yes, an AP photo, but also its subversion of visual culture. In all of his work, the artist pulls from Russian Constructivism, pop art, hip-hop, punk, skateboarding, and artists like Warhol, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, and Barbara Kruger.  He raids the cultural image bank and riffs on it, appropriating elements to change the way we see things and ideally even think about things.  ‘Fair use’ copyright battles aside, Fairey asks us to “consume with discretion” and on his website http://www.obeygiant.com/about sites Heidegger’s account of Phenomenology to “enable people to see clearly something that is right before their eyes but obscured.”

If one thing was clear from listening to Fairey talk, it’s that he knows his culture.  From band trivia and blogging to politics and economics, this guy knows what’s up and he probably has an opinion about it.  He quoted Led Zeppelin, wore a black Ramones t-shirt, spoke openly about “selling out,” patience, his process and how it’s changed with time and the Internet, and when prompted, admitted to being arrested 16 times.  The Greer Garson Theatre was packed with students and community members who lined up for a Q&A that could’ve lasted all night.  Luckily, students have the opportunity all week to ask Fairey questions as he painted an indelible public artwork on the SFUAD campus.

http://www.santafeuniversity.edu/News/NewsRoom/Shepard-Fairey-To-Paint-Mural-On-SFUAD-Campus.aspx

http://www.santafeuniversity.edu/About/ArtistsForPositiveChange.aspx

https://www.facebook.com/santafeuniversity

www.youtube.com/user/SantaFeUniversity

http://www.santafeuniversity.edu/RSS/SFURssFeed.aspx

(HE)ART PLACES / THE NIGHT (AND THE SILENCE) IN THE FASCINATING MEDIEVAL TUSCANY VILLAGE

© Photos by ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

The historical centre of Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena, Tuscany, Italy) is a well kept medieval fortress-village, where you may walk through incredible narrow streets and squares, all built with the local grey stone.

The castle of Abbadia is first mentioned in a document dating to 1203, which shows that the community came under the aegis of a communal hierarchy headed by a Podestà, under the political control of Orvieto. A few years later, the strenght and power of this communal organization are described in the “bill of freedom” (“Carta delle libertà”) granted in 1212 to communal chancellors by the Abbot of the San Salvatore monastery.

The pattern of settlements in the area of Abbadia was defined around the mid-XII Century, when under the pressure of external threats, the local population, up until then scattered over the surrounding countryside, came together within one large fortified settlement.

The Abbey and all the Medieval centre are telling us how Abbadia San Salvatore was important in the past. All its area is rich in history and traditions, that to a great extent can be found in documents in the old archive belonging to the monastery dedicated to the Saviour. The archive contains many references to the importance and power of the Abbey.

In Abbadia we may also admire the Servadio Theatre (1873), a tiny but fascinating place. It was built thanks to the initiative of the Carli and Gragnoli families; it is dedicated to Giacomo Servadio (XIX Century) a Florentine member of Italian Parliament, banker, musician and theatre producer. Between the end of XIX Century and the beginning of the XX, the building was the seat of a friendly Society of the workers of Abbadia, where in XIX Century quicksilver mines began their activities, now closed and presented in a museum.

MY “ALPHABET COLLAGE” INSPIRED A BEAUTIFUL POEM BY CANADIAN ARTIST PURUSHA HONTOY

"LOST WORDS IN THE RAGE DAYS", BY ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI, COLLAGE ON WOOD, 94X51, 2013

“LOST WORDS IN THE RAGE DAYS”, BY ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI, COLLAGE ON WOOD, 94X51, 2013

 “MOTS EN MAJUSCULES”

Purusha Hontoy

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Les mots déchirent l’espace

Et les lettres majuscules

Éclaboussent le temps

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La peur d’être perdue pour le monde

Ronge mes sangs historiques

Suis-je née pour me taire?

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J’ai mal aux verbes et aux phrases

Que j’aimerais tant former

Pour tenter ma pénétration universelle

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La peur d’être perdue pour le monde

Ronge mes sangs historiques

Suis-je née pour me taire?

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Tant de lettres au bout des lèvres

Et aux milliers de papiers chiffonnés

Gardées dans un tiroir

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Qui a la clé de mes chants silences?

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Photos: The “Alphabet Collage” (“Lost Words in The Rage Days”, created by Roberto Alborghetti with 400 pieces of waste-paper from torn and decomposed publicity posters, 94×51, on wood, 2013)

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© Poem Copyright Purusha Hontoy

© Artwork Copyright Roberto Alborghetti

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ABOUT PURUSHA

Purusha Hontoy est une amie des arts de la vie. Diretrice et Formatrice chez l’Ecole l’Art de Vivre (Quebec, Canada).

GALERIE PURUSHA (QUEBEC, CANADA)

PURUSHA HONTOY (AT LINKEDIN)

“Ondes Vibrantes…”:tokens and Colors in a Magnification of Cracks on a Railway Carriage – Lacer/actions Postcards # 23 (robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com)

“INTERPERSONAL SKILLS AND YOU” / THE “CHEETAH KNOW HOW” SERIES

By Michelle LaBrosse, PMP®, Chief Cheetah and Founder of Cheetah Learning, and Kristen Medina, CAPM®, Co-Author

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roberto alborghetti laceR-Actions

Please hold for a scene from the movie The Office:

Bob: “What would you say ya do here?”

Tom: “Well look, I already told you! I deal with the goddamn

customers so the engineers don’t have to! I have people skills! I am

good at dealing with people! Can’t you understand that? What the

hell is wrong with you people?”

And we’re back. For those of you who have scene The Office, you most likely know this scene. For those of you who haven’t, watch this short clip – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCC_PxRWVI4   – as it is imperative for the intellectual debate we are about to delve into.

Interpersonal skills often get a bad wrap as being “common sense” or fluffy”, with people giving more of their time and attention to

develop their technical skills. But the truth is, the more we lose

focus on the importance of interpersonal skills, the more at risk we

are to have a poor emotionally intelligence, which can hurt our

relationships and our careers. Interpersonal skills are becoming

such a hot topic, that this specific subject even has its very own

appendix in the PMBOK Guide – Fifth Edition (which will be tested

starting July 31, 2013).

So why are interpersonal skills so important to project managers?

Let’s take a look at 11 aspects of interpersonal skills stressed in

the PMBOK Guide – Fifth Edition, to get a better understanding of

how interpersonal skills shape your projects and shape your career.

1. Leadership – When you are able to lead from a place of trust and respect (rather than from using punishments to illicit fear) your

project team will be able to accomplish so much more. When you are a good leader, you have the ability to get things done through others,

and use each individual’s strength to the advantage of the entire

team. To be a successful leader, you can’t just create a submissive

team – you need to create an inspired team that shares your vision

and understands how their contributions are helping to achieve that

vision.

2. Team Building – You can’t put together a group of people that

seem to make a good team “on paper” and expect reality to align with your expectations.  And, unless you are really lucky, a team will

need to proactively work on team building in order to be effective.

The team can do this by openly and honestly talking about their

expectations in their unique team roles, deciding how they will deal

with conflict should it arise, and focusing on problems in terms of

possible solutions – not in terms of blaming people for the

problems.

3 Motivation – How do you get a committed team who will work hard toward a project’s goal? First, you need to find out how to motivate them. This task may be more difficult than you originally think, because not everyone is motivated in the same way. One person may be  money motivated, while another is better by professional achievement and growth. Get to know your team and what motivates them, and develop a strategy to improve incentives that speak to those motivations.

4. Communication – As you most likely already know, communication, or lack thereof, can make or break a project team. While a communication plan can greatly help in ensuring effective

communication, there are many other interpersonal dynamics that

impact effective project team communication, such as cultural and

communication style differences. 

5. Influencing – The skill of influence is very powerful, and can be

used either destructively or productively. You, as a project manager

with good intentions, have it in your greatest interest to improve

your influence skills to a level where you have the power to make

significant changes and improvements in your project team and

organization.

6. Decision Making – How will you and your team make important project team decisions? Will you as the Project Manager make decisions on your own, or will you involve your team for most

decisions? Its important to take some time to think about the

decision making process that will take place in your project team,

as it will effect many other areas, such as motivation and team

building.

7. Political and Cultural Awareness – The days are gone where a Project Manager can live in an isolated bubble of their particular

circumstance and experience and expect to be able to relate to

others. In today’s global environment, successful project managers

do not only recognize and accommodate cultural diversity – they

capitalize on it.

8. Negotiation – Think about how many times you negotiate every day. Whether it pertains to what you watch on TV that evening (if I get to choose the restaurant, you can decide what we watch afterward) to what currency in which your newest international deal will be conducted – negotiations permeate every part of our life. The more you listen to the other party and understand their needs wants, as well as your own, the better you will be able to find a mutually beneficial solution that is win-win for both parties. 

9. Trust Building – Can you imagine working on a project team where each person only has their own interests in mind, and neither trusts or likes anyone else on the team? Neither can I. Trust is the

foundation of a good project team, and give the entire team the

flexibility they need to accomplish tasks in the way they best know

how.

10. Conflict Management – When we hear the word “conflict”, we often think of fighting, relationship deterioration, and stress. But this  negative connotation does not have to be your project team’s

reality. Turning conflict into collaborate problem solving is one of

the best experiences a team can have, as it addresses the validity

of dissenting opinions and aims to make the situation better than it

was before.

11. Coaching – A project team reaches the ultimate level of

productivity when each team member feels empowered to reach their full potential.  When you invest in your team in the form of

training and formal or information coaching, they will in turn

invest in the project and organization with their time, skill, and

expertise.

So the next time someone asks you – “What would you say ya do

here?” You can say with confidence that you are a Project Manager

that utilizes your interpersonal skills (“people skills”) to create

effective and successful project teams that can move mountains.

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About the Author:

Michelle LaBrosse, PMP, is an entrepreneurial powerhouse with a penchant for making success easy, fun, and fast. She is the founder of Cheetah Learning, the author of the Cheetah Success Series, and a prolific blogger whose mission is to bring Project Management to the masses.

Cheetah Learning is a virtual company with 100 employees, contractors, and licensees worldwide. To date, more than 50,000 people have become “Cheetahs” using Cheetah Learning’s innovative Project Management and accelerated learning techniques.  

Recently honored by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), Cheetah Learning was named Professional Development Provider of the Year at the 2008 PMI® Global Congress. A dynamic keynote speaker and industry thought leader, Michelle was previously recognized by PMI as one of the 25 Most Influential Women in Project Management in the world.

Michelle’s articles have appeared in more than 100 publications and websites around the world. Her monthly column, the Know How Network, is carried by over 400 publications.

She is a graduate of the Harvard Business School’s Owner President Manager’s (OPM) program and also holds engineering degrees from Syracuse University and the University of Dayton. 

COLLAGE MADE WITH 400 PIECES OF WASTE-PAPER FROM TORN PUBLICITY POSTERS / “LOST W-O-R-D-S…” (PIC & CLIP)

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Roberto Alborghetti ‘s Collage made with 400 pieces of waste-paper from torn and decomposed publicity posters. “Lost W-o-r-d-s In The Rage Days”, 94×51, 2013, “Lacer/actions Project”.  Soundtrack: “Pacifica” by D.Christopher O’Donnell-Smith and Jon Dix.

Collage di Roberto Alborghetti realizzato con 400 pezzetti di carta-straccia da manifesti pubblicitari strappati e decomposti. “Parole S-m-a-r-r-i-t-e nei Giorni di Rabbia”, Cm. 94×51, 2013, Progetto “LaceR /Azioni”. Colonna sonora: “Pacifica” di D.Christopher O’Donnell-Smith, Jon Dix.

"LOST WORDS IN THE RAGE DAYS", BY ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI, COLLAGE ON WOOD, 94X51, 2013

“LOST WORDS…”, BY ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI, COLLAGE ON WOOD, 94X51, 2013

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