FROM SAHARA TO TIBET: IN ROME THE LARGEST RETROSPECTIVE DEVOTED TO GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER KAZUYOSHI NOMACHI

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF PRESS OFFICE / “NOMACHI:LE VIE DEL SACRO” EXHIBITION,  2013-2014, ROME.

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“Kazuyoshi Nomachi: Le Vie del Sacro” (The Ways of the Sacred) is the title of a great show hosted in Rome (Italy) at La Pelanda, Centro di Produzione Culturale, Piazza Orazio Giustiniani 4, from December 14, 2013 to May 4, 2014. 

The exhibition is described as the largest retrospective devoted to Kazuyoshi Nomachi as well as the first time that the work of Japanese photographer has been exhibited in the West. There are about 200 images in the exhibition which is divided into seven sections spanning the photographer’s 40-year career. Nomachi has documented various peoples and ancient traditions in some of the world’s most remote places, always obtaining a level of discretion, even sacredness in his work.

 Kazuyoshi Nomachi has always been a documentary photographer, since his first trip in the Sahara when he was twenty five years. In Africa was fascinated by the great outdoors and the strength of the people who live in such difficult environments. For over 40 years, around the theme “the prayer of the search for the sacred”, he turned his attention to the most diverse traditional cultures which            are the expression of the peoples who inhabit the lands harsher, to the four corners of the world. Nomachi was able to capture the spirituality that runs through the landscapes of unique and extraordinary beauty, where the portraits and human figures assume an absolute dignity and blend with the context in almost pictorial            compositions, dominated by a dazzling light, real and transcendental at the same time, as we admire in the wonderful exhibition in Rome.

http://www.mostranomachi.it/

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 THE SEVEN SECTIONS OF THE EXHIBITION

DESCRIBED BY KAZUYOSHI NOMACHI  

Ethiopia

Ethiopia is a land of plateaux and deserts, divided in two by the Rift Valley, where tectonic activity continues to lacerate the African continent. The country is characterized by great diversity, and the areas inhabited by man range from uplands at an altitude of 3,500 meters to desert 115 meters below sea level. Eighty-three ethnic groups live here, each holding fast to their own culture. In the midst of a “Sea of Islam”, a Christian culture, which has been passed on from generation to generation since ancient times, still survives in these isolate uplands at an average altitude of 2,500 meters. During its 3,000-year history, Ethiopia has always maintained close relations with Arabia and Palestine across the Red Sea, rather than with Black Africa. In the mountains of North Ethiopia, I have seen churches carved out of the rocks and isolated monasteries where worship is the same as it was in biblical times.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Ganges

The great river Ganges originates in the Himalayan glaciers, flows across the Indian plains for 2,500 kilometers and empties into the Bay of Bengal. This muddy river, swollen by monsoon rains, is a perennial source of irrigation for Indian agriculture, and its waters, profoundly linked to the veneration of Shiva, are worshipped. The sins of those who immerse themselves in the Ganges are washed away, and people who scatter the ashes of their dead upon its waters allow the deceased’s soul to be reborn in heaven, freed from the sufferings of reincarnation. I have visited several of the many sacred places along the banks of the river, which are always crowded with pilgrims. At the Maha Kumbh Mela festival, the main Indian religious event that astrologers have decreed should take place every 12 years, tens of millions of Hindus gather to pray, participating in ceremonies and rituals inherited from ancient India.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Islam

Islamic faith, that advocates the worship of Allah as the one God, was founded in the 7th century by Muhammad, a merchant in Mecca. One hundred years later it had taken a firm hold and expanded to constitute a vast cultural area stretching from the Iberian peninsula to India. The teachings of Islam – whose heart lies in Mecca where the Kaaba, the symbol of Allah, is located – have spread throughout the world, and today there are 1.6 billion believers. According to the Quran, all Muslims must undertake a pilgrimage to Mecca at least once in a lifetime. I had the privilege of photographing the sacred site thanks to a Saudi publisher.

The pilgrimage is the fulcrum of Islamic faith, the source of its vitality. The Shiite Muslims live mainly in Iran and the surrounding regions. Since their credo is influenced by the religious beliefs of ancient Persia, there are facets of Shiite Islam that are not evident in the strict monotheism of the Arabian Peninsula.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Sahara

The land gradually becomes more arid as you cross over the high Atlas Mountains then head south; the road leads to an extremely dry area composed of layers of sand and rock. As soon as you get past the hostile, towering rocks, you find yourself in a world of sand, sculpted in breathtaking, undulating dunes. The vast emptiness continues, even after driving for three or four days and is only broken by the green patches of the oasis.The magnitude of Sahara does not lie solely in its vastness: until a few thousand years ago, it used to be a part of a wet climate zone as can be seen from the images depicting life and animals carved in the rocks of the mountainous areas over a period of 8,000 years.

When I discovered the Sahara in 1972, I was completely captivated by it. On my return trips I felt time and again that I had perceived its true nature, which is hardly visible and seems almost hidden by a veil”.

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Nile

I was 34 years old when, in October 1980, I began exploring the Nile in a jeep that I had brought from Europe. The diverse nature and the people along the Nile absolutely enchanted me. I was particularly fascinated by a tribe of herdsmen living with their animals, like they did in prehistoric times, in South Sudan. Sadly, this region has been turned into a wasteland by the endless civil war and the famine that began in 1983. When South Sudan gained independence in 2011, I had a great desire to see what had happened to that tribe of breeders with my own eyes. After 32 years, I stood again in the endless wilderness where livestock and men coexist. Despite the fact that modern civilization has now penetrated the remotest regions in Africa, the lifestyle of these herdsmen has basically remained the same: they still live amidst the smoke from burning cow dung to ward off the mosquitoes.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Tibet

My first travels to Tibet date to the end of the 1980s. The Tibetan plateau stretches into the heart of Asia, way beyond the Himalayas. The average altitude is 3,500 meters in these cold uplands, where vegetation is scant.

The people survive on pasturage and make their living raising yak, which are acclimatized to the high altitude. Tibet is a devout Buddhist country. After inheriting Buddhism from India, Tibetans deepened it through their unique sensitivity and their view of life, forged by the harshness of a rigid climate. In contrast to other Buddhist countries, where the religion became vulgarized over time and gradually distanced itself from the original form, the Tibetans have shaped their society through the enrichment of Buddhist teachings founded on the theory of reincarnation. Western countries now refer to Tibetan Buddhism as ‘the’ Buddhism. This is partly due to the Tibetans’ optimism and gentleness, which stem from their belief in the equality of life, nurtured by the finite ecology of Tibet and the Himalayas.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Andes

The North and south Americas were cut off from Eurasia until Columbus discovered the ‘new continents’, while the original Inca culture had expanded to the high Andes in the South American continent: however, when the Spanish arrived there in the 16th century, the vast Inca empire was destroyed in a flash. It was a tragic encounter between the strongest nation in the world, which sailed across the Atlantic to colonize the Inca, and a people who had no knowledge of the outside world. The Spanish conquerors forced a part of the population of the Andes to convert to Christianity. The Inca secretly incorporated the traditional Inca faith in the Christian religion, transforming it into a unique form of Andes Christianity. The origin of the Quyllur Rit’i pilgrimage, on which I went in 2004, lies in the legend that Jesus Christ incarnate appeared on a high mountain near Cusco, at a place the Incas believed to be holy ground.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

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 ABOUT KAZUYOSHI NOMACHI

http://www.nomachi.com/index_en.html

Kazuyoshi Nomachi was born in Japan in 1946 in Kochi Prefecture. He studied  at Kochi Technical High School and started taking photographs then as a teenager. In 1969 He studied photography under Takashi Kijima. In 1971 he began his career as a freelance advertising photographer and in the next year he made his first trip to the Sahara where he was shocked to see the strong life of the people living under the harsh environment of the area. This made him to switch his career to  photojournalism.

Through his long experience at the extreme dryness of the Sahara, he gained an inspiration from the Nile which was fostered as the theme, The Nile ever lasting water flow that never dry up while running through the dryness of the Saharah. With this theme, from 1980 he started his coverage of the White Nile from the Nile Delta up to its first drip of water at an iceberg in Uganda and up the Blue Nile to its origin at the highlands of Ethiopia. The coverage of the two flows allowed him to capture the images of the strength of the environment and the people of this vast region of Africa.

Since 1988 he turned his attention to Asia. With the occasion of his coverage of the western areas of China, he got attracted with the people living at the extreme altitude of Tibet and the Buddhism. This encounter led to his visit to almost whole area of Tibetan cultural zone and initiated his visit to the origins and the whole area of the sacred Ganges which is also the roots of Hinduism from 2004 to 2008. From 1995 to 2000 Nomachi had access to the holiest city of Islam and travels for five years in Saudi Arabia, having the very opportunity to photograph the largest annual pilgrimage to Mecca and  Medina. It had been the first to document so deep and wide the miraculous pilgrimage of over 2 million Muslims towards their holy city, Mecca.

From 2002, he visited the Andes highlands, Peru and Bolivia with a theme of the blending of the catholic belief with the Inca civilization. His visit to this area still continue since then. Concentrated in 12 major anthological issues, his photographs have been published worldwide and appeared in major photo magazines, such as The National Geographic, GEO and Stern. The work carried out in the Sahara, along the Nile, in Ethiopia, Tibet and Arabia, have aroused great admiration over the years , even in Western countries and have won numerous awards, including the Annual Award of the Photographic Society of Japan in 1990 and 1997 and the Medal of Honor with Purple Ribbon in 2009.

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SILK, STARS AND SCARVES / TEXTILE DESIGNS FROM DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS…

This is a “festive gallery” for the limited-edition series of 3 silk scarves created by Roberto Alborghetti, for his “Lacer/actions Art  Project”

Their design is… unique. They reproduce details of torn posters images and “urban signs” I captured around the world. I accepted the challenge that italian textiles designer Bruno Boggia offered me. Bruno, with the invaluable assistance of his daughter Lucia and his staff, helped me selecting  artworks to be converted into silk scarves designs.

Bruno Boggia Studio works with the most famous designers and fashion brands in the world (Capucci, Lacroix, Valentino, Lancetti, Mila Schon, Chanel, Celine, Dior, Y.S.L., Etro, Escada, Donna Karan, Paul Smith, Rolando Santana…) So, the images of dirty and ripped papers – left to decompose on  city walls or billboards – after being transformed in canvases, lithographs and videoclip, are now artistic and original silk scarves (100 % Crepe de Chine).  

  • For informations:  ro.alb@alice.it ; andrea@velar.it

ABSTRACT XMAS (FROM CRACKS…) WISHING YOU WONDERFUL DAYS

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions

“BLADES OF LIGHT

IN THE DEEP SKY

OF THE STARRY NIGHT”

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Realistic and not manipulated image of cracks on a disfigured traffic sign

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© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions

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LAME DI LUCE

NEL PROFONDO CIELO

DELLA NOTTE STELLATA”

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Immagine realistica e non manipolata di una “crepa”

su un cartello stradale deturpato

LETTERS FROM ADULTS TO SANTA CLAUS: A STUDY REVEALS THE MOST SENSITIVE WISHES SENT TO POST OFFICE IN ROVANIEMI (ARCTIC CIRCLE)…

 SANTA CLAUS 2

In addition to half a million kids, thousands of adults from all around the world send letters to Santa Claus every year. A study has been conducted in Finland on adult letters with the goal of finding out what is their idea of Santa Claus.

The most common idea is that Santa Claus is like a saint, a messenger of good hope who sets an example in being kind. The deepest and most sensitive wishes in the letters are expressed to a god of love, and the senders ask the god to help them find the love of their life. Even in the very secular culture of today, Santa Claus seems to be a powerful indicator of conscience and a guardian of high morals.

 Even though the material consists of letters sent by adults, the senders insist that they are kind or they indirectly tell Santa Claus that they are kind-for example, by being ecological. Santa Claus receives letters all year round. “For ten years now, my job has been to sort and read the letters at Santa’s Main Post Office in the Santa Claus Village in the Arctic Circle in Rovaniemi. I assume that confiding in Santa Claus and addressing difficult topics make people feel better and provides them with a way to solve problems and to visualize their goals,” says Riitta Mattila, who has studied letters to Santa Claus.

 Based on Mattila’s material, there are 14 ideas of Santa Claus: a messenger of good will, God, confidant, friend, pen pal, person who implements gift requests, god of love, therapist, green savior of the world, gift receiver, merciful judge, educator and a rewarding character as an educational tool, a physician and a population register system.

The material included a sample of letters written by Finns (13-93 years old),from letters sent to Santa Claus for Christmas 2010. Every year, a comprehensive set of letters to Santa Claus are annually archived in the provincial archives of Oulu. Researchers may borrow the material for research purposes confidentially without revealing personal information. Riitta Mattila, literature thesis, University of Oulu, 2013: Rakkauden jumala ja hyväntahdonlähettiläs (god of love and a messenger of good will) Joulupukin representaatioita aikuisten suomalaisten kirjeissä vuonna 2010 (Santa Claus in letters sent by adult Finns in 2010).

Santa Claus’ Main Post Office in Santa’s Workshop Village is the only official post office for Santa Claus. It is located in the Arctic Circle, in Rovaniemi in Finnish Lapland. Santa Claus’ Main Post Office belongs to Finland’s official postal service network, and it has a special postmark all of its own. It handles all the mail that Santa Claus receives and sends.

Since 1985, Santa Claus’ Main Post Office has received approximately 16 million letters to Santa. During the past few years, our beloved Santa has received more than 500,000 letters per year, from approximately 200 different countries. Santa replies to the majority of the letters himself, provided that the sender has included his/her address in the letter. From Santa Claus’ Main Post Office, you can also order a letter from Santa that will be mailed to delight the recipient just before Christmas.

Santa Claus gets visitors from all over the world. At Santa Claus’ Main Post Office, it is Christmas all year round and visitors are served by post office elves in full Christmas dress. Each year, Santa Claus’ Main Post Office is visited by approximately half a million people, 90% of which are from abroad. In addition, the Post Office is visited annually by more than 100 international media representatives.

Santa Claus’ Main Post Office is a beautiful building made of natural stone and aged pine, with the Tontun torni (Elf’s Tower) as a landmark in front of it. The origin of the Post Office is linked to the visit made by Eleanor Roosevelt, former First Lady of the United States, to Rovaniemi in 1950. A cottage was built for her in the Arctic Circle and as of June 11, 1950, all letters mailed from there were franked with a special Arctic Circle postmark. The cottage is still in its place in front of the current Post Office.

Each letter, card and parcel mailed at Santa Claus’ Main Post Office is franked with a special postmark and stamps. The logo of Santa Claus’ Main Post Office was designed by the graphic designer Pekka Vuori. The logo is also a registered trademark. The postmark contains a stylized logo that was edited to its current form by the graphic designer Jukka Talari in 2012. This special Arctic Circle postmark is a popular collectable and souvenir.

Santa Claus’ Main Post Office serves its customers in a unique manner. It is open every day of the year and the customers are served in several languages. The items mailed by the customer are franked and delivered when the customer wishes them to be delivered, e.g. for Christmas. The product selection on sale at Santa Claus’ Main Post Office includes unique Christmas cards, Christmas stamps and thematic stamp folders, among other items. You can order a letter from Santa both at the Post Office and also online at

www.posti.fi/goshopping

http://www.posti.fi/ostoksille

Further information:

The website of Santa Claus’ Main Post Office: www.santaclaus.posti.fi

Santa Claus tells more about Santa Claus’ Main Post Office and Lapland on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGXEIzY35l8

Opening hours: in December from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., in June, July and August from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., other times from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Santa Claus’ Main Post Office, Santa’s Workshop Village, Tähtikuja 1, Rovaniemi, FI-96930 Arctic Circle, Finland

tel. +358 20 452 3120

joulupukinpaaposti@posti.fi

COLORS & METAL / MY “LACER/ACTIONS” ON ALUMINIUM: OTHER 4 WORKS FOR PRIVATE COLLECTION OF FAI SERVICE (ITALY)

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

Other four new works from my “Lacer/actions on Aluminium” series. All the eleven installations are now part of private collection of Fai Service, in Italy, who participated to this “experimentation” curated and produced by “Passepartout” (Bergamo, Italy).

After being re-produced on canvases, lithographic prints and textiles (silk and cotton), my images about decomposed publicity posters, cracks and “road signs” have found a new way to be showned and represented. Now they are on aluminium plates… Aluminium metal gives brilliancy, depth and strenght to colors and shapes, reaching chromatic effects and emphasizing textures “as an unmistakable complement of interior design and decoration…”

For infos: ro.alb@alice.it

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti, LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

***

Roberto Alborghetti ‘s LaceR/Actions is a multidisciplinary project and research about the apparent chaos of decomposed posters, cracks and urban/street signs. Transferred on canvases, reproduced on lithographic prints or textiles (as pure silk), re-built on collages or scanned in videoclips, the images of torn and disfigured posters and natural cracks  give new meanings and expressions to paper lacerations and matter decomposition, as you may see in this gallery showing eleven works from the collection of about 50.000 images captured so far by Roberto Alborghetti during his research all around the world.

The most recent Roberto Alborghetti Show (“Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”) was displaced for 100 days in the enchanting Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany (Piancastagnaio, Siena, Italy) from October 6, 2012, to January 15, 2013.

A surprise public exhibition, for one night only (“Lacer/actions Show”) took place on July 14, 2013, for a special event with Historical Place in a beautiful and ancient square (Palace of Countess, Ambivere, Bergamo, Milan area, Italy). His recent projects: “Contemplations and Lacer/actions” (album, videoclip, installations, inspired by Thomas of Bergamo Scripts 1563-1631) and “Atelier of Colors and Emotions” (a project which involved autistic kids ).         

KANDINSKY, A GREAT EXHIBITION IN MILAN: 80 MASTERPIECES FROM THE CENTRE POMPIDOU COLLECTION. A JOURNEY WITH A PIONEER OF ABSTRACT ART

 

Vassily Kandisky, The Centre Pompidou Collection” show opened in Milan, at Palazzo Reale, yesterday December 17 recounting the artistic and spiritual journey of Vassily Kandinsky, one of the pioneers of abstract art (the exhibition will run until April 27, 2014).

Promoted and produced by the Milan department of culture, Palazzo Reale, the Centre Pompidou, 24 ORE Cultura – Gruppo 24 ORE and Arthemisia Group, this major exhibition presenting over 80 key works by Kandinsky in chronological order is curated by art historian Angela Lampe  of the Centre Pompidou and, for Italy, by Ada Masoero.

Deeply impressed by Monet’s Haystacks series at the Impressionist exhibition of 1896 in Moscow, Kandinsky abandoned a university career to become a painter. In addition to undertaking the classic course of studies under the guidance of masters such as Anton Azbé and Franz von Stuck in Munich, he stayed at Sèvres near Paris from 1906 to 1907 (Park of Saint-Cloud, 1906). He thus developed and artistic vision encompassing numerous fields, from painting to music and theatre, in which he sought and defended what he defined in his well-known text as “the spiritual in art”.

The show is organized in sections corresponding to the major periods in Kandinsky’s life, from the early years in Germany to those in Russia and then France, providing an opportunity to discover a host of crucial works such as Old Town (1902), Windmill in Holland (1904), In Grey (1919), Yellow-Red-Blue (1925), Colourful Ensemble (1938) and Sky Blue (1940).

The exhibition opens with a surprise, plunging visitors into an environment endowed with “the power to transport them outside space and time”. The wall paintings of this initial room, recreated in 1977 by the painter restorer Jean Vidal, faithfully reflect the five original gouaches that Kandinsky produced for an octagonal room at the Juryfreie Kunstausstellung, the “jury-less show” held annually in Berlin from 1911 to 1930. The gouaches were among the works donated to the Centre Pompidou by the artist’s widow Nina in 1976.

The exhibition develops in chronological order in four sections over eight rooms.

Munich, 1896–1914

Kandinsky moved from Russia to Munich to study painting in 1896, when the city was abandoning Symbolism to become a European capital of the Jugendstil or Art Nouveau, a movement pursuing the path of art through decorative projects. Kandinsky began with small, late-Impressionist landscapes like Schwabing (1901) and works of glowing colour in tempera inspired by ancient Germanic legends and the life of old Russia (Old Russia, 1903–04). It was, however, as from 1908, during summer stays at Murnau, where his mistress Gabriele Münter bought a house, that he created the first works using bright colours to translate reality into flat, two-dimensional images inspired by Fauvism. Landscape thus became a pretext for exercises on form and investigations into the power of colour leading to the initial process of abstraction (Improvisation III, 1909).

Kandinsky wrote Concerning the Spiritual in Art in Munich, a lucid theoretical analysis of his pictorial experimentation, from the relationship between form and colour to that between colour and sound. He led the Blaue Reiter project with his friend Franz Marc, which was to hold two shows in the period 1911–12 and produce in May 1912 the celebrated Blaue Reiter Almanach, where music and visual arts were closely entwined and popular and where “primitive” arts were assigned a primary role in a radical renewal of painting. Kandinsky created his first works totally detached from reality during this period (Painting with Red Spot, 1914), translations of his inner world into abstract images.

Back in Russia,1914–21

When World War I broke out, Kandinsky was forced to return to Moscow and left nearly all the works produced in Munich with Gabriel Münter. He worked exclusively on paper in 1915 (Untitled, 1915) and only resumed painting in 1916. After marrying the much younger Nina Andreyevskaya and returning briefly to figuration, he was caught up in the aftermath of the October Revolution and occupied key roles in the new cultural institutions until 1920. While he painted little due to his official commitments, he now espoused abstract art definitively (as in the crucial work In Grey, 1919). Having come under attack from the younger and more radical constructivist avant-garde for his spiritual expressionism, he thus decided to return to Germany in 1921.

The Bauhaus years, 1921–33

Kandinsky, who gained recognition for his written work, was invited by Walter Gropius to teach at the prestigious school of architecture and art known as the Bauhaus. He took charge of the wall paintings course in 1922 and produced the huge decorations for the atrium of the Berlin Juryfreie Kunstausstellung with his students in the same year. 1922 also saw the Small Worlds portfolio of prints, a synthesis of his pre-war Expressionist works, the new and more geometric style of the Russian period and the new developments of the Bauhaus (Black Grid, 1922). The years at the Bauhaus saw close friendship with Paul Klee and the publication of Kandinsky’s other major theoretical work Point and Line to Plane (1926). The titles of his paintings – Orange (1923), On White II (1923), Yellow-Red-Blue (1925) – highlight the relationship between colours and geometric shapes. The first organic forms made their appearance in 1930. The closure of the Bauhaus in 1933 under pressure from the Nazi regime forced him to move again, this time to Paris.

Paris, 1933–44

Kandinsky arrived in Paris in 1933. While indisputably the capital of the art market, the city was also devoted to its own artists (Picasso and the Surrealists above all) and had little interest in the pure abstraction of a Russian artist with German citizenship. Kandinsky moved into a house at Neuilly-sur-Seine looking onto the river and the Bois-de-Boulogne. Enchanted by the limpid, crystalline light, he lightened his palette. At the same time, not least through the influence of his Surrealist friends Jean Arp and Joan Miró, his paintings and works on paper saw a proliferation of biomorphic forms, amoebae, creatures of the depths, embryos and insects (Colourful Ensemble, 1938; Sky Blue, 1940; An Intimate Celebration, 1942). Kandinsky plunged into this microcosm, also in order to escape from the anguish of war. He died on 13 December 1944 without seeing the end of the fighting.

VASSILY KANDINSKY

The Centre Pompidou collection

Palazzo Reale, Milano | 17 dicembre 2013 – 27 aprile 2014

MON 14.30 – 19.30 | TUE, WED, FRI, SUN 9.30 – 19.30 | THU, SAT 9.30 – 22.30

Info and booking: +39 02 54916

http://www.kandinskymilano.it

#kandinskymilano

MY “LACER/ACTIONS ON ALUMINIUM”: OTHER 4 WORKS ON A WALL AT PRIVATE COLLECTION OF FAI SERVICE (ITALY)

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

Other four new works from my “Lacer/actions on Aluminium” series. After being re-produced on canvases, lithographic prints and textiles (silk and cotton), my images about decomposed publicity posters, cracks and “road signs” have found a new way to be showned and represented. Now they are on aluminium plates… Maybe due to a surprising chemical reaction, aluminium gives brilliancy, depth and strenght to colors and shapes, reaching chromatic effects and emphasizing textures “as an unmistakable complement of interior design and decoration…”

All the eleven installations are now part of private collection of Fai Service, in Italy, who participated to this “experimentation” curated and produced by “Passepartout” (Bergamo, Italy).

For infos: ro.alb@alice.it

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions, esclusively for Fai Service Italy

Roberto Alborghetti ‘s LaceR/Actions is a multidisciplinary project and research about the apparent chaos of decomposed posters, cracks and urban/street signs. Transferred on canvases, reproduced on lithographic prints or textiles (as pure silk), re-built on collages or scanned in videoclips, the images of torn and disfigured posters and natural cracks  give new meanings and expressions to paper lacerations and matter decomposition, as you may see in this gallery showing eleven works from the collection of about 50.000 images captured so far by Roberto Alborghetti during his research all around the world.

The most recent Roberto Alborghetti Show (“Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”) was displaced for 100 days in the enchanting Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany (Piancastagnaio, Siena, Italy) from October 6, 2012, to January 15, 2013.

A surprise public exhibition, for one night only (“Lacer/actions Show”) took place on July 14, 2013, for a special event with Historical Place in a beautiful and ancient square (Palace of Countess, Ambivere, Bergamo, Milan area, Italy). His recent projects: “Contemplations and Lacer/actions” (album, videoclip, installations, inspired by Thomas of Bergamo Scripts 1563-1631) and “Atelier of Colors and Emotions” (a project which involved autistic kids ).