ART IS A FORM OF HEALING / SRINI PILLAY’S WORDS + LACER/ACTIONS

*

Some good thoughts about art and healing

from SRINI PILLAY  – http://www.srinipillay.com/

psychiatrist, Harvard clinician, brain-imaging researcher

author and speaker.

Artwork by ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI, Canvas, 57×87

Title: “In amniotic fluid”

For Lacer/actions Project / Realistic images about torn and decomposed publicity posters, natural cracks and scratches, urban signs. 

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI,  LACER-ACTIONS, CANVASES  (19)

 

Advertisements

FLORENCE, ART AS AN EXPERIENCE OF GEOMETRY (#1) / IMAGES FROM THE BEAUTIFUL FAÇADE OF S.MARIA NOVELLA

© Photos: ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

*

The Church of Santa Maria Novella is one of the most important Gothic churches in Tuscany. The exterior is the work of Fra Jacopo Talenti and Leon Battista Alberti. The interior holds extraordinary works of art including Masaccio’s Trinità, Ghirlandaio’s fresco cycle in the Tornabuoni Chapel and Giotto’s Crucifix, among others. The convent was built between 1279 and 1357 by Dominican friars near a 7th century church located in the fields just outside Florence’s medieval walls. The lower part of the Marble façade, which is Romanesque in style, is believed to have been executed by a Dominican architect, Fra Iacopo Talenti da Nipozzano, while the upper part was completed only 100 years later in 1470 by Leon Battista Alberti. Thus, the façade is not only the oldest of all the churches in Florence but it is also the only church with its original, planned facade still in place today! As you will see, the church of San Lorenzo never even received its planned marble façade while others were completed centuries later but with new designs.

ITALIAN NEWSPAPER “LA NAZIONE” WRITES ABOUT MY ART (STORY BY JOURNALIST ANTONELLA LEONCINI)

 

DOWNLOAD THE FULL PAGE (PDF):LA NAZIONE 20 aprile 2014

LA NAZIONE Newspaper - April 20, 2014, Story by journalist Antonella Leoncini - Photo: Debra Kolkka

LA NAZIONE Newspaper – April 20, 2014, Story by journalist Antonella Leoncini – Photo: Debra Kolkka

JACKSON POLLOCK, GREAT EXHIBITION IN FLORENCE: A VIRTUAL COMPARISON WITH RENAISSANCE GENIUS MICHELANGELO BUONARROTI

Jackson Pollock, the undoubted master of action painting, comes to Florence for a virtual comparison with Renaissance genius, Michelangelo Buonarroti. The exhibition in question, entitled La figura della furia [The figure of fury, Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento, from April 16 to July 27], which, inspired by the studies of the American painter during his youth and by his interest in Michelangelo’s work, offers a comparison between styles, subjects, stories and very different worlds. Pollock’s shapelessness mirrors Michelangelo’s unfinished work, the Renaissance with its classical Florentine and Italian form is painted in perfect contrast with the American’s artist anti-form. This exhibition – an epoch-making experiment and event – is being held to celebrate the 450th anniversary of Michelangelo Buonarroti’s death (he died in Rome on February 18, 1564) and it will take place in two locations: at the Palazzo Vecchio, which is home to Michelangelo’s Genius of Victory statue in the Salone dei Cinquecento, where Pollock’s drawings and paintings will be on display, and the former San Firenze courthouse, where the multimedia part of the exhibition will be set up, offering interactive and educational areas on the life and art of the painter.

The exhibition’s curators Sergio Risaliti and Francesca Campana explain that Jackson Pollock is famous for having been the founder of action painting. His dripping has contrary effects, if not completely the opposite, to what was achieved by Buonarroti on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, where the artist was obliged to work according to the figurative and dogmatic doctrines of the time, although the painting was spread across the ceiling as if it were a horizontal level at an unreachable height and not on a canvas, placed vertically on an easel a short distance from the viewer and at an angle with the artist’s body.

The worlds of the two artists do have a connection, however, in Pollock’s younger studies, when the future star of 20th-century American painting was still undecided as to whether he wanted to become a painter or a sculptor. We know from documents housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York that the young Pollock studied and reflected upon Michelangelo’s work. There are sheets of paper bearing drawings by Pollock, Sketchbooks I and II, which reproduce the ‘naked’ in the Sistine Chapel, the Cumaean Sibyl and The Prophet Jonah, certain figures in the Flood, and even Adam in his famous position and studies of positions and drapery in the Judgement. Valuable information is revealed in an essay by Katharine Baetjer, published by the American museum in 1997, on the occasion of an exhibition dedicated to these important sketchbooks.

Exhibiting Pollock in Florence therefore has a truly epoch-making meaning, the curators emphasize. It is a moment to compare two worlds and two ages: one of which seems to be focused on the transcendence of the figure and on the sublimation of matter in body movement; the other on the phenomenology of formlessness and on the mystical geometry of chaos. Like Michelangelo, Pollock can be defined as a “universal artist” and, like the genial Florentine sculptor, he seems to have worked on every piece as if in a frenzy. “When I am ‘in’ my paintings, I am not fully aware of what I am doing,” said Pollock, while Michelangelo stated in his poems: “I feel in me Love, almost as high as the Stars”.

***

For informations:

www.pollockfirenze.it

 

LAUGH YOUR WAY TO THE TOP / “THE CHEETAH KNOW HOW” SERIES

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceRActions

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions

***

Guest Writers:

Michelle LaBrosse, PMP®

Chief Cheetah and Founder of Cheetah Learning,

and Kristen Medina, CAPM®, Co-Author

*

Read the new article by Michelle LaBrosse.

*

Choose your favorite format

*

MICROSOFT WORD FORMAT

LAUGH YOUR WAY TO THE TOP April

*

ADOBE PDF FORMAT

LAUGH YOUR WAY TO THE TOP April

*

HTML FORMAT:

LAUGH YOUR WAY TO THE TOP

STREAMS OF COLORS AND SHATTERED WAVES… (IMAGES FROM A DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTER)

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceRActions (3)

This photo-gallery is dedicated to eleven abstract images coming from one of the most interesting decomposed and torn publicity posters I ever seen during my long research about ripped ads, cracks, scratches and urban signs ( I posted a clip last week). It was located in Lecco, a beautiful town on Como Lake (Italy). The natural actions (and re-actions) made by time, weather and environmental conditions (rain, sun, dust, smog, humidity) produced a capturing and harmonious mash-up of colors and shapes. I really had the luck to be in the right time in the right place… (in the following days the billboard was covered with new publicity posters). The whole torn outdoor advertising showed me pre-existing images that were crushed and de-structured in thousands of particleswhich presented fascinating colored streams and waves dancing on a completely white background. You may see “live” the torn publicity poster on this clip:

FLYING LACER/ACTIONS – CLIP ON YOUTUBE