MY “SHOOTING STAR” WORK SUPPORTING “AN EXHIBITION FOR A RESTORATION” PROJECT IN NORCIA (PERUGIA-UMBRIA, ITALY)

" A FALLING STAR" BY ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI, COLLAGE, CM 53X35

“SHOOTING STAR”

by Roberto Alborghetti

COLLAGE OF WASTE-PAPER PIECES FROM TORN

AND DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS

2012, CM.53X35

This work is a collage created with 300 waste-paper pieces from torn and decomposed publicity posters.

It was selected and donated to the 40th edition of “An exhibition for a restoration” project which intends to protect and to preserve a great piece of art by Jacopo Siculo (XVI Century), “Incoronazione della Vergine”, in the beautiful Norcia (Perugia, Italy).  

My “Shooting Star” work will be on show in Norcia (Umbria, Italy) from July 12, 2014 to September 7, 2014,  at Complesso monumentale San Francesco. The event is promoted by Comitato “Una mostra, Un restauro”.

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Roberto Alborghetti ‘s LaceR/Actions is a multidisciplinary project and research about the apparent chaos of ripped and decomposed posters and urban/street signs. Roberto has already collected, around the world, more than 50.000 images.

Transferred on canvas, reproduced on lithographs or textiles (as pure silk), re-build on collages, or scanned in videoclips, the details of torn publicity posters give new life to paper lacerations and decomposition.

See the “Collages Gallery”:

   https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/laceractions-the-collages-gallery/

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Norcia BANNER UNA MOSTRA UN RESTAURO

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A JAR OF RAINWATER / CLOUDS DRIFTING / TWO OR THREE

a-jar-of-rainwater2

© Artwork by Roberto Alborghetti – Lacer/actions project

© Verses by Joshua Seller

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A jar of rainwater

clouds drifting

two or three

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Una brocca di pioggia

si lasciano sospingere

due o tre nuvole

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Une broc de pluie

se laissent pousser

deux ou trois nues

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Une jarro de lluvia

se dejan transportar

dos o tres nubes

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“A jar of rainwater” is part of my collaboration with musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, USA). Fusing Joshua ‘s words with my images – realistic pics of torn and decomposed publicity posters, natural cracks, scratches and urban signs – , we created a series of haiga: a combination of  haiku and visual art.

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

 

 

THE CLIP: “GREEN CODES” / ABSTRACTISM FROM A RUBBISH CONTAINER

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The pictures on the clip aren’t paintings, oils, acrylics, watercolors or digital works, but natural, random and not manipulated images of the amazing imperfection of the real world we see around us.They come from a rubbish container I saw a few weeks ago near Como Lake (Italy). R.A.

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Roberto Alborghetti ‘s LaceR/Actions is a multidisciplinary project and research about the apparent chaos of decomposed posters, cracks, scratches and urban/street signs. Transferred on canvases, reproduced on lithographic prints or textiles (as pure silk), re-built on collages or scanned in videoclips, the images of torn and disfigured posters and natural cracks give new meanings and expressions to paper lacerations and matter decomposition, as you may see in this gallery showing some works from the collection of about 50.000 images captured so far by Roberto Alborghetti during his research all around the world.

The most recent Roberto Alborghetti Show (“Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”) was displaced for 100 days in the enchanting Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany (Piancastagnaio, Siena, Italy) from October 6, 2012, to January 15, 2013.

A surprise public exhibition, for one night only (“Lacer/actions Show”) took place on July 14, 2013, for a special event with Historical Place in a beautiful and ancient square (Palace of Countess, Ambivere, Bergamo, Milan area, Italy). His recent projects: “Contemplations and Lacer/actions” (album, videoclip, installations, inspired by Thomas of Bergamo Scripts 1563-1631),  “Atelier of Colors and Emotions” (a project which involved autistic kids ) and “Lacer/actions on Aluminium” (eleven installations for Fai private collection).

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR-Actions, 2014 (7)

INCREASING FOCUS AND PRODUCTIVITY WITH “TIMEBOXING” / “THE CHEETAH KNOW HOW” SERIES

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR-Actions

© Roberto Alborghetti – LaceR/Actions

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Guest Writers:

Michelle LaBrosse, PMP®

Chief Cheetah and Founder of Cheetah Learning,

and Megan Alpine, CAPM®, Co-Author

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MOONLIT SKY / QUIVERING CREPE MYRTLES /AND THEIR SHADOWS

moonlit-sky

© Artwork by Roberto Alborghetti – Lacer/actions project

© Verses by Joshua Seller

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Moonlit sky

quivering crepe myrtles

et their shadows

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Cielo dal chiaro di luna

tremolanti mirti crespi

e le loro ombre

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Ciel au clair de lune

des tremblants myrtes crépus

et leurs ombres

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Ciel al claro de luna

tremolantes mirtos crespos

y sus sombras

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Moonlit Sky” too is part of my collaboration with musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, USA). Fusing Joshua ‘s words with my images – realistic pics of torn and decomposed publicity posters, natural cracks, scratches and urban signs – , we created a series of haiga: a combinationof haikuand visual art.

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

IN A SPIDER WEB / CHERRY BLOSSOM PETALS / TWILIGHT BREEZE

in-a-spider-web

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© Artwork by Roberto Alborghetti – Lacer/actions project

© Verses by Joshua Seller

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In a spider web

cherry blossom petals

twilight breeze

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In una tela del ragno

petali di fiore di ciliegio

brezza del crepuscolo

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Dans une toile de l’araignée

pétales du fleur de cerisier

brise du crépuscule

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En la telaraňa

petalos de la flor de cerezo

brisa del crepusculo

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“In a spider web” piece is part of my collaboration with musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, USA). Fusing Joshua ‘s words with my images – realistic pics of torn and decomposed publicity posters, natural cracks, scratches and urban signs – , we created a series of haiga: a combination of haiku and visual art.

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

“NO CLOUDS / THE WIND REVEALED / IN TALL GRASSES”

no-clouds

© Artwork by Roberto Alborghetti – Lacer/actions project

© Verses by Joshua Seller

(November, 2011)

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No clouds

the wind revealed

in tall grasses

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Nessuna nuvola

il vento rivelato

nelle erbe alte

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Pas des nuages

le vent révélè

dans les hautes herbes

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Ninguna nube

el viento revelado

en las hierbas altas

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No clouds” is part of my collaboration with musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, USA). Fusing Joshua ‘s words with my images – realistic pics of torn and decomposed publicity posters, natural cracks, scratches and urban signs – , we created a series of haiga: a combination of haiku and visual art.

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.