ROME, WHERE THE ANCIENT MANUSCRIPTS BY MICHELANGELO AND CARAVAGGIO ARE BACK TO LIFE

© Roberto Alborghetti

 

They have restored pages of important documents such as manuscripts by Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Garibaldi and other characters of history and culture. They have unearthed ancient and significant pages, thanks to which they gave back value to events and moments in history and art. Their own work is art. I’m talking about Restauro San Giorgio (San Giorgio Restoration), founded in 1989 by a passion for books restoration of the owner, Adriano Pandimiglio, grown in the laboratory of parents who have worked in this field for over forty years (they had also participated in the recovery of damaged works during the flood in Florence, happened in November 4, 1966).

The company has a great experience gained from decades of historical laboratory “Restoration Angelo Pandimiglio”, and over the years it has been enriched by experiences with a keen eye for new techniques, equipment and materials. The growth and development of the activity are the result of continuous and punctual restoration work, carried out with professionalism and competence for leading institutions responsible for preservation of Italian cultural heritage. The techniques and materials are constantly changing, therefore the staff is updated continuously following courses and conferences where they are exposed and presented new methods of intervention on Cultural Heritage.

The restoration are all supervised by the Technical Department guided by Adriano Pandimiglio and Kasia Ingalis, who graduated from the School of Higher education for the Restoration of Cultural Property in Cremona as technical restorer of Library Heritage, documentaries and works on paper. After several internships in important restoration laboratories and institutions for the protection of the cultural heritage of books, Kasia joined the Restoration of St. George team, as a restorer and Technical Director.

The team of restorers is composed of personnel with long and proven experience in the Restoration of Books. The laboratory possesses the SOA quality certification for OS2 categories A and B. There are two operational offices, in Rome and in Soriano nel Cimino (Viterbo). The laboratory of Rome covers an area of ​​500sqm with equipments for the restoration and is organized in several areas according to the various stages of processing.

The goal is to save the works from decay with effective but not invasive interventions, living to the volume, or hard copy, its physical and aesthetic identity. The main purpose of restoration is  the consolidation of deteriorated areas. These are the key-actions: working on the material damage with targeted techniques, high quality materials and fully reversible; Clean, if necessary, in full respect of the history of the asset involved; bind using the same techniques employed at the time of creation of the artifact.

Restauro San Giorgio carried out conservative restorations of ancient modern, rare and valuable printed books,; parchment and paper codes; manuscripts and archival documents; prints; artistic and technical drawings; blueprints; heliographs; old newspapers, boxes and containers, antique leather or parchment paper,  paintings on paper and cardboard, maps of large formats,  brochures, marbled and decorated papers, photos, vintage posters and flyers, photomechanical reproductions on canvas, leather bindings, paper, parchment, wooden planks and tissues, decorative items made of paper, parchment, leather, paper mache.

Yes, here at Restauro San Giorgio, the ancient papers are back to life.  Together with the power and the strength of the written word.

http://www.restaurosangiorgio.com/

restaurosgiorgio@tiscali.it

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RELATED ARTICLE IN ITALIAN LANGUAGE – ARTICOLO CORRELATO IN LINGUA ITALIANA

https://okayscuola.wordpress.com/2016/03/02/un-restauro-che-fa-testoecco-come-i-libri-antichi-riprendono-a-vivere/

 

 

 

 

 

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THE SPECTACULAR FLOATING EXHIBITION OF HISTORICAL BOATS SAILING IN THE LEONARDESCO PORT CHANNEL IN CESENATICO (THE ONLY ONE IN ITALY)

 

 

In Cesenatico ( Adriatic Sea, Italy) the old sailing vessels of the Marine Museum are moored side by side with modern fishing boats which still punctuate with their time out of the Harbour, designed by Leonardo, on the docks where there is the city life. The old fish market, still active, just steps from the Piazzetta and preservation where fish was stored in the ancient and characteristic artifacts excavated in the soil.

Located near the ancient Roman settlement of Ad Novas, “Porto Cesenatico” was officially founded at the beginning of the fourteenth century, when Cesena dig a channel for berthing of boats and puts a rock in his defense. The seaport is becoming more important, thanks to the works performed during the Malatesta in the fifteenth century, to prevent the silting of the harbor.

The port channel runs through the center and houses historic boats, modern boats, fishing nets and cries of gulls, the voices of the sailors mingle in the life of the city in a place that can boast the title of Porto Leonardesco. The daily life still takes place mainly along the docks, and interwoven with references to the appearances of a maritime labor time and truly spectacular floating exhibition of historical boats sailing in the Maritime Museum, that of winter become home to one of the most unusual nativity of Italy.

The harbor was dug at the beginning of the fourteenth century, perhaps in the footsteps of an ancient port, was by then the subject of ongoing work by hydraulic engineers, among which we remember above all that of Leonardo da Vinci, who made a careful survey and a drawing in 1502 on behalf of Caesar Borgia, which aims to improve and strengthen it. Around the harbor is developed over time the town of Cesenatico, divided into two districts of the “Monte” and “Vlore”, with the fishermen’s houses, warehouses for goods, and canned fish. Ciceruacchio still visible in the square the perimeter of the Tower Pretoria, which once stood in defense of the raids of Barbary pirates and functions of the customs and maritime defense of healthcare.

In the heart of the historic center of Cesenatico, the harbor Leonardesco as a living museum and everything to see, which can also count on stable and qualified supply of a network of cultural institutions all located on its banks: the Maritime Museum, Casa Moretti, Antiquarian Hall.
In the most recent and most tract near the sea, the Port Channel branches off to the east, the Mazzarini vein, an artificial channel dug in the mid nineteenth century, with tree-lined shores, while to the west opens up the dock. Here, in the most inner basin, home to the marina, while in the outer basin (the “dog” for old sailors) there are tourist motorboats, a part of the fishing fleet, shipyards and maintenance services, and a modern slipway.

The “Floating Maritime Museum”, the only one in Italy, is located in the most ancient and characteristic feature of the port of Cesenatico. This synthesis of many centuries of maritime history: small and large events related to boats, fishing and maritime trade. Cesenatico from its origin until the economic upturn in tourism, is always identified with the port.
The floating section of the museum contains the prototypes of the boats and middle Adriatic, which in summer are still showing the colorful sails on the third decorated with symbols of the families of fishermen, who frequented the port of Cesenatico after the disappearance of the lateen sail and before the advent of motorization.

In the floor section of the Marine Museum are exhibited the navy, the tools to use, and are appropriately described the techniques of construction of the hulls and those used for the various types of fishing and sails for the maneuver. Cesenatico today, with its docks, canals, water veins and the Maritime Museum, evokes the harsh experiences of the human past, to teach present and future generations a way certainly more aware of life at sea.

INSIDE THE VATICAN PALACES #2 / EXCLUSIVE: THE FRESCOES BY MICHELANGELO IN CAPPELLA PAOLINA (LIMITED ACCESSIBILITY AREA)

I recently had the honour to meet Pope Francis for the presention of the biography I wrote about him. The private encounter took place in Casa Santa Marta, an unpretencious house where he usually lives. Before the encounter I had a very special gift: the possibility to visit some of the beautiful rooms in the Apostolic Palace in Vatican City. I been also in the enchanting Cappella Paolina (the Pauline Chapel) to admire the incredible fresco paintings by the Italian Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti : The Crucifixion of St. Peter (c. 1546–1550) and The Conversion of Saul (c. 1542–1545).

Being a sacred space, Pauline Chapel is a limited accessibility area. Despite the efforts of contemporary scholars to illustrate the genius behind these two works, they remain relatively obscure. This is due primarily to the fact that tourists are not permitted to enter the Pauline chapel because it’s a worship space. Most of those who do know of these works will never have the opportunity to see them in person. According to Williams no other work by Michelangelo has ever been so grossly misrepresented in reproductions. The only way to view these works as the artist intended them to be seen is to see them in situ.

The Crucifixion of St. Peter is the last fresco executed by Michelangelo. The artist portrayed St. Peter in the moment in which he was raised by the Roman soldiers to the cross. Michelangelo concentrated the attention on the depiction of pain and suffering. Pope Paul commissioned this fresco by Michelangelo in 1541 and unveiled it in his Cappella Paolina. Restoration of the fresco completed in 2009 revealed an image believed to be a self-portrait of Michelangelo himself. Vasari states about the fresco: “There are no landscapes to be seen in these scenes, nor any trees, buildings or other embellishments and variation”.

The positioning of St. Peter himself is often noted as the most interesting innovation Michelangelo implemented in this piece. He defied convention by positioning Peter’s upper body so that it cranes upward and twists his neck around so that his eyes make contact with the viewer.

The Conversion of St. Saul or St. Paul  is often discussed in conjunction with The Crucifixion of St. Peter. As its title suggests, the fresco represents the conversion of a lawyer from Tarsus named Saul (a man who prosecuted Christians) into a follower of Christ. In the book of Acts, Paul states that he saw an impossibly bright light and heard the voice of Christ himself. The blindingly bright light is the Apex of this story. The style is more mannerist than his earlier Sistine Chapel frescoes, and was not as well received by contemporaries.

Giuseppe Frangi (30 Giorni) writes: “On 25 January 1540, the Feastday of the Conversion of St Paul, until then celebrated in the Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls, Pope Paul III Farnese consecrated to the saint whose name he had taken, the new parva (small) chapel, commissioned from Antonio da Sangallo the Younger and built in just three years in the heart of the Papal Palace. The chapel – parva as opposed to the chapel magna, the functions of which had been taken over by the Sistine – was the chapel intended for the conclave. And above all it was the place where the Blessed Sacrament was kept, for which purpose it had been fitted with both an altar and a tabernacle. When Paul III consecrated it, the chapel had no decorations, but it was clear who would climb the scaffolding: it was again up to Michelangelo, just down from the scaffolding of the Sistine Chapel, where he completed the great toil of the Last Judgment”.

 The reconstruction of the work – Frangi states – done day by day, made possible by modern restoration techniques, shows Michelangelo was capable of getting through a large amount of work in a day. Eventually there were 172 working days (85 for the Conversion of St Paul and 87 for the Crucifixion of St Peter), spread over seven years, with the break in 1544, when he was halted by health problems. These frescoes were largely ignored for centuries and incurred a great deal of damage due to neglect. In the early twentieth century there were some scholars who came to reconsider the frescoes under the new light of expressionism and abstraction.

William Wallace proposed an entirely new perspective on the subject claiming that the disproportionate quality of the figures is not a failing on the part of Michelangelo, but rather another instance of his genius. According to Wallace, the real innovation in this piece comes from the incorporation of time and space in the overall composition of the frescos. In addition to conceiving of these frescoes in terms of perspective, Michelangelo also took into consideration the architectural and environmental context they were to be set in.

After the last restoration Pope Benedict XVI said: “The two faces are opposite each other. One might therefore imagine that Peter’s face is actually turned towards the face of Paul, who, in turn, does not see, but bears within him the light of the Risen Christ. It is as though Peter, in the hour of supreme trial, were seeking that light which gave true faith to Paul”.

(2 – To be continued)

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RELATED ARTICLES:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2014/01/18/i-lead-you-inside-the-vatican-palaces-1-the-beautiful-berninis-royal-staircase/

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https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2014/01/16/extraordinary-day-i-met-pope-francis-for-the-presentation-of-the-historical-biography-i-wrote-about-him-images-talk-better-than-words/

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https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2013/12/11/pope-francis-person-of-the-year-my-new-book-tells-his-extraordinary-life-2-volumes-unpublished-stories-340-photos/

I LEAD YOU INSIDE THE VATICAN PALACES #1 / THE BEAUTIFUL BERNINI’S ROYAL STAIRCASE…

© Roberto Alborghetti

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Before my recent private encounter with Pope Francis  for the presention of the biography I wrote about him, I had the way to visit some of the beautiful rooms in the Apostolic Palace in Vatican City; as we know, Pope Francis doesn’t live there, but  in the unpretencious house, Casa Santa Marta, where I met him.

I been firstly on the incredible Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s Scala Regia ( Royal Staircase) which is a flight of steps and part of the formal entrance to the Vatican. It was built by Antonio da Sangallo the Younger in the early 16th century, to connect the Apostolic Palace to St. Peter’s Basilica, and restored by Gian Lorenzo Bernini from 1663 to 1666.

The site for the stairs, a comparatively narrow sliver of land between church and palace, is awkwardly shaped with irregular converging walls. Bernini used a number of typically theatrical, baroque effects in order to exalt this entry point into Vatican. The staircase proper takes the form of a barrel-vaulted colonnade that necessarily becomes narrower at the end of the vista, exaggerating the distance. Above the arch at the beginning of this vista is the coat of arms of Alexander VII, flanked by two sculpted angels.

(1 – TO BE CONTINUED)

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RELATED ARTICLES:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2014/01/16/extraordinary-day-i-met-pope-francis-for-the-presentation-of-the-historical-biography-i-wrote-about-him-images-talk-better-than-words/

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https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2013/12/11/pope-francis-person-of-the-year-my-new-book-tells-his-extraordinary-life-2-volumes-unpublished-stories-340-photos/

MY NEW BOOK IS OUT: THE FIRST ILLUSTRATED BIOGRAPHY OF POPE FRANCIS, “PERSON OF THE YEAR” (2 VOLUMES, UNPUBLISHED STORIES, 340 PHOTOS)

 GUEST WRITER: PRESS OFFICE – VELAR-ELLEDICI PUBLISHING

 Pap Francesco (613x800)

“FRANCESCO”

(Francis)

Author: ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

Preface: Cardinal GIOVANNI BATTISTA RE

Published in Italy

by VELAR-ELLEDICI

Available in 2 versions:

2 volumes (+ casket) and 1 single volume

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“The most-awaited event for Italian publishing industry”

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Over 550,000 lines of text, 14 chapters, 340 photographs, 6 months of work and researches: these are the numbers that define the “first historical and illustrated biography” about new Pope Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the 266 th Pope of history, the first to assume the name of Francis, the first South American Pope, the first Pope belonging to the Society of Jesus.

Francis” helps us to know a “son of Italian immigrants” who became the leader of the Roman Catholic Church. The volumes – “the most-awaited event for Italian publishing industry” as media stated – dig deep into the historical records and documents starting from the news about the Pope’s family, reconstructing moments and facts concerning the emigration from Italy to Argentina, specifying dates, times and procedures.

The Author writes about the childhood of the future Pope Francis, his progressive steps in education, his lung disease, his religious vocation on the backdrop of social and historical scenarios of Argentina. “Francis” also delves into the distinctive elements of cultural education of the future Pope Francis, his relations with the  world of Latin American thinkers, authors and essayists (Jorge Luis Borges, Methol Ferrè, Gera, Scannone) who drew new perspectives for South American continent. The book  contextualizes informations and news related to the evolution of social and historical periods in Argentina, as president Peron’s age. 

Unpublished testimonies help to discover Jorge Mario Bergoglio during his years at the helm of the Jesuits in Argentina, his pastoral insights, his role in saving lives during the military dictatorship (1976-1983), his experiences as rector at the Collegio Massimo in San Miguel, his presence in the “barrios” between the poor and emergencies in Buenos Aires, sharing the difficulties of the population in the years of severe economic crisis that hit Argentina at the beginning of the Twenty-First century. The last chapters are dedicated to the first months of Francis pontificate.

BOOK PAGE AT VELAR SITE – (SHOPPING ONLINE)

BOOK INFORMATIONS AT ELLEDICI SITE

FRANCESCO, IL VIDEOCLIP

Related articles

http://poy.time.com/2013/12/11/person-of-the-year-pope-francis-the-peoples-pope/

FRANCESCO di Roberto Alborghetti, Ed. Velar-Elledici - Copia (2)

“THE ALLEGORY OF PATIENCE”: ONE OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT PAINTINGS IN THE MEDICI COLLECTIONS ON SHOW AT PALAZZO PITTI IN FLORENCE (ITALY)

 VASARI

At Galleria Palatina (Palazzo Pitti, Florence, Italy) an exhibition opened on one of the most significant paintings in the Medici collections, The Allegory of Patience, which belonged to cardinal Leopoldo de’ Medici and is today held in the Sala di Prometeo in the same Palazzo Pitti. Initially attributed to Parmigianino in the inventories of Palazzo Pitti, catalogued in the museum’s first guides under the name of Francesco Salviati, and later attributed to Girolamo Siciolante by Federico Zeri, the painting is today recognised as fruit of the collaboration between Giorgio Vasari and Spanish artist Gaspar Becerra. Its complex collectors’ history involves important figures tied to the court of Cosimo I and Giorgio Vasari himself.

The first of these was Bernardetto Minerbetti,bishop of Arezzo and ambassador of Cosimo I, a refined man of letters and patron of the Renaissance philosophical and literary academy known as the Accademia Fiorentina. Shortly after 1550, he requested Vasari to execute a painting that in a new and emblematic manner would represent the principal virtue of his character, that is to say the art of Patience. Vasari accepted and proposed to his patron an invention inspired by ancient sculpture, enriched by a refined symbolic repertory alluding to time and to the life of man. The invention took the shape of a young woman chained to a rock, patiently waiting for the drops of water falling from a vase to corrode the stone and thus set her free. This scholarly and very cultured image would become quite popular far beyond the borders of Florence, soon reaching the Ferrara court of Ercole II d’Este who did not hesitate to use it in his ‘impresa’. In fact, a few years after Minerbetti’s painting, Duke Ercole II d’Este commissioned a new version of the Patience from Camillo Filippi, intended for the so-called “Camera della Pazienza” in the tower of Santa Caterina of his castle in Ferrara. The Duke also introduced the same personification on the verso of a famous medal that Pompeo Leoni coined in 1554, on the base of a bust sculpted by Prospero Sogari Spani and in a series of coins produced by the mint of Ferrara.

Anna Bisceglia curates the exhibition and the catalogue published by Sillabe to investigate these elements along the underlying themes of patronage, literary sources, and artists’ explorations against the complex and fascinating backdrop of the Italy of royal courts. Alongside the Vasari Allegory of Patience, visitors will see the same theme in an artwork that Camillo and Sebastiano Filippi executed in 1553-54 and currently in the Galleria Estense of Mantua. This version also inspired the portrayal of this virtue on the base of the bust of Ercole II sculpted by Prospero Sugari, known as Clemente (1554), and on the medals that Pompeo Leoni executed for the Duke (Florence, Bargello, 1554 ca.). Moreover, a large painting from the Galleria dell’Accademia of Venice will illustrate the complex genesis of this iconographic motif. It was part of a wooden coffered ceiling executed for the Corner family in 1542. Finally, the exhibition will also present the little painting on wood from the Uffizi, mistakenly known as Artemisia mourns Mausolus, which instead has been recognised as a Patience, and several drawings and engravings from the Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe of Florence and the Cabinet des Dessins du Louvre.

P.Leoni - Duca Ercole

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Exhibition Credits

Promoters

Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali e Turismo, Direzione Regionale per i Beni Culturali e Paesaggistici della Toscana, Soprintendenza Speciale per il Patrimonio Storico, Artistico ed Etnoantropologico e per il Polo Museale della città di Firenze, Galleria Palatina, Firenze Musei

Exhibition Venue

Galleria Palatina – Palazzo Pitti, Florence, 26 November 2013 – 5 January 2014

Exhibition curated and Catalogue edited by Anna Bisceglia

Exhibition directed by Alessandro Cecchi

Exhibition installation designed and directed by Mauro Linari

Exhibition installation produced by Opera Laboratori Fiorentini – Civita Group

Coordination, communication and public relations: Opera Laboratori Fiorentini – Civita Group

Ticket prices

Full price: € 13.00; Concessions: € 6.50 for E.U. citizens from 18 to 25 years of age. Free admission for visitors under 18 and E.U. citizens over 65 years of age. Hours: Tuesday – Sunday: 8:15 am – 6:50 pm; ticket counter closes at 6:05 pm. Closed Mondays

“DEATH OF A CAMERAMAN”: EHIBITION OPENS IN NEW YORK EXPLORING THE POWER OF IMAGES… ARE CAMERAS WEAPONS?

Death of a Cameraman

organized by Martin Waldmeier

apexart

291 Church Street

New York

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Opening reception:

Thursday, September 12: 6-8 pm

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On view:

September 13 – October 26, 2013

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Featuring work by:

Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin, Harun Farocki, Rabih Mroué

Hrair Sarkissian, Rudolf Steiner. An Unsolicited Proposal Program winning exhibition.

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On July 1, 2011, in the neighborhood of Karam Shami in Homs, Syria, a young man stands on the rooftop of a building. He uses his cell phone to document gunfire in the streets below as his camera suddenly catches sight of a gunman on an adjacent balcony. For a brief instant, the cameraman and the gunman directly face each other. A single shot is fired. The camera falls, and with the cameraman’s death, image and reality collapse into one.

In the course of recent political events, anonymous cameramen and women have emerged as powerful new figures in the politics of representation and mediation, documenting conditions that surround them while simultaneously carrying the biggest stakes in the telling of th eir story. They create images that do not necessarily show violence, but are visible manifestations of it; images that do not seek to create viewers, but witnesses.

Death of a Cameraman revolves around a powerful moment in which the making of an image becomes a matter of life and death, with the camera functioning both as an extension of the eye and as a weapon. The exhibition explores the power of images to influence reality and alter the course of events. Are cameras weapons? Can they penetrate reality? What’s at stake in the making of images? What does it mean to bear witness through them?

Martin Waldmeier is a curator from Basel, Switzerland, and currently a Ph.D. candidate in Visual Culture at Goldsmiths, University of London, writing a dissertation on translation as an artistic practice. Waldmeier was a Fulbright fellow in Visual and Critical Studies at the School of the Art Institute, Chicago, and received an MA in Modern and Contemporary Art History from the University of Bern. His current research interests include aesthetics of migration, images and narrations of conflict, cultural translations, and the politics of language in the present-day cultural industry.

apexart’s exhibitions and public programs are supported in part by the Affirmation Arts Fund, Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Bloomberg Philanthropies, The Greenwich Collection Ltd., Lambent Foundation Fund of Tides Foundation, and with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts. This exhibition is also supported in part by the Stanley Thomas Johnson Foundation; the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia; Kalfayan Galleries, Athens-Thessaloniki; and Video Data Bank.

www.apexart.org

291 church street

New york, ny 10013

t. 212.431.5270