“HEALING EPILEPSY NATURALLY? IT IS POSSIBLE!” : AMERICAN ARTIST ROSANNA MARTELLA TELLS IN A BOOK HER (IN)CREDIBLE STORY…

 rosanna martella pic

As a result of the sting of a wasp, I had an anaphylactic shock and nearly died. This was the catalyst that made me begin experiencing epileptic seizures. Following a macrobiotic lifestyle helped me to realize that I had always been allergic to gluten, which had weakened my immune system. The wasp merely brought my allergy to the forefront. I am grateful to the Universe for sending me that wasp and propelling me to heal. It totally changed my life for the better”.

Rosanna Martella is an amazing artist living in the Northeast (Great Philadelphia Area). As a sculptor and painter she is very active and was surprised when she found out she had epilepsy. She healed herself naturally and wholly, this is her story (“Healing Epilepsy naturally” book) and her guide to healing yourself from what doctors call “an incurable condition”. Rosanna Martella is a counselor and consultant who assist others in their journey with epilepsy. She has cured international clients from Egypt and all over the world. Let her wisdom and knowledge be your ticket to healing and peacefulness.

 rosanna martella

Rosanna says: “I tell my story how I healed my self from Grand Mal Seizures in the book “Healing Epilepsy naturally”. I had a shock from a bee stung… I became hill with epilepsy. I discovered after, not only I could not digest “gluten”, but I was allergic to fat. Wheat protein, oil and fat accumulate in the body, would reach a point that it will bring a seizure. I used the Macrobiotic ancient philosophy of diet and lifestyle to heal my self without the use of medicine”.

www.thehealthmode.com

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AN “ART THERAPY” PROJECT: FROM DISABILITY TO CREATIVITY / THE ENCHANTING ARTWORKS CREATED BY GUESTS OF “CASA FAMIGLIA” (ITALY)

By Roberto Alborghetti

Un Invito” (An Invitation) and “Pensieri a colori” (Thoughts in colors) are the titles of two books – recently published by Marna with Velar editing – which enchant and fascinate heart and eyes. They gather images, colors, thoughts and stories created by guests at Casa Famiglia (House Family)  located in Rivolta d’Adda (Cremona, Italy). Casa Famiglia –   a solidarity institution founded by father Francesco Spinelli – welcomes serious and severely disabled persons (with physical, mental and sensory problems) and people at higher risk of “abandonment” and “social exclusion and family emergencies.” The service provide an integrated and comprehensive response to the needs of the disabled persons supporting them in rehabilitation, promotion and development of potentialities. 

The two publications are moving in the wake of this attention. True artist’s hands, like those of Emiliana, Paola, Rosanna and Mariangela – with the collaboration of  employees and volunteers  –  put together a fascinating kaleidoscope of creativity, in a fascinating way of art therapy project. Different techniques artworks take us on a remarkable journey where perception and observation –  and the look of heart! – create colourful paintings and scenaries, communicating us emotions and feelings. It’s a sort of life story expressed from a “special point of view”. The artworks are made up of things and recycled materials, as stones, paper, sand… A rehabilitation project through the use of art instruments.

The activities started from a free association of ideas which revealed several images: children, nature, sea, forest, water and so on. Some of these elements were captured and translated into expressive images, through a process of creative experimentation.

During the weekly workshops were used different expressive materials such as acrylic paints, chalk, sand, sawdust, glitter, all produced on sheets of medium size and thickness, in order to facilitate a free flow of creativity and to establish a communication bridge with “outside” reality.  In every moment of this  experience the team involved has kept in mind the basic concept of the book project: “Diversity is an opportunity for discovery and confrontation.”

These two books are showing us how the human being – in every path of life – has the power to amaze us. And how disability can bring astonishing creativity.

For informations : Casa Famiglia Padre Francesco Spinelli, Rivolta d’Adda (Cremona, Italy). Tel. 039 0363 77022 / Fax 039 0363 370 264; casafamigliaspinelli@tiscali.it

RELATED ARTICLE (ITALIAN LANGUAGE VERSION)

http://okayscuola.wordpress.com/2012/05/08/colori-e-arte-per-raccontare-la-vita-in-due-pubblicazioni-i-capolavori-degli-ospiti-di-casa-famigliadi-rivolta-dadda-cr/

REMOVING THE BARRIERS FOR SPEED

 

By Michelle LaBrosse, PMP®, Chief Cheetah and Founder of Cheetah Learning, and Kristen LaBrosse, CAPM® , Co-Author

As we cruise through our career path, it can be tempting to fall into comfortable patterns and turn autopilot on as we coast from project to project. But as the world changes and projects become more complex, it is imperative to remain in the drivers seat to ensure that we are constantly removing road blocks that make our project teams falter and pause. Follow the below tips to ensure that you and your project team are moving along at Cheetah Speed.

Create Limits with Your Space and Time. Have you ever sat at your desk thinking about what you needed to do, but kept putting off the tasks at hand in favor of procrastinating? Sometimes when we are sitting in our work area we trick ourselves into thinking that we are being productive. This is because we are so close to actually being productive in our work space – we have the desk prepared, the computer is powered on, and the pen is readied. But we are fooling ourselves; productivity is not an area, it is an action.

To help rid yourself and your team of this habit, make sure that you set limits on your workspace and time. If you are sitting in your workspace and not working, it means you need to take an actual break, as you are not making yourself more productive by staring at the computer screen. Set a time limit to take a break to do whatever it is that is distracting you from work, whether that is getting lost in the world of Facebook status updates or scrolling through your Pinterest account. Then come back to your workspace with a goal in mind, and don’t take any breaks until your goal is completed. Most people find their groove when they are working towards a goal, so don’t be surprised if you don’t need a break after you have accomplished your task. By creating more boundaries for yourself within your work, you’re remove the barrier of distraction and are able to accomplish more.

Healthy Team Dynamics. While team members’ hard skills are an important aspect of any project team, it is important for the team to not lose sight of the soft skills that make working together possible. Conflict within a project team can be one of the biggest barriers to speed and can not only be frustrating but a waste of time and resources.

Growing up, we’ve all learned the Golden Rule: Treat others the way that you want to be treated. But to ensure that your project team is harmonious and successful, make sure that you are all following the Platinum Rule: Treat others how they want to be treated. The more you pay attention to how others prefer to communicate and the style of work that they prefer, the better you will be able to work in a way that maximizes their capabilities.

Take a “Funk-buster” Break. It’s three p.m. You are on your third cup of coffee and staring at your computer, but for some reason your brain won’t work, and you still have to finish your quarterly report! This condition is commonly referred to as a “funk” and happens when your body thinks it is sleeping because it hasn’t exerted any energy for a significant period of time. When you find yourself in a funk, instead of trying to push your way through it, take a break. Get up out of your chair and do some jumping jacks. Take a walk around the block. Have a small dance party for one. Stop the funk as soon as you can by getting some motion into your body to remind your brain that it needs to be on alert and ready for action.

Achieve Flow. You now have a productive project team that sets time and space boundaries, has great team dynamics, and is funk-proof. The next thing to do is to ensure that your team has the skills and motivation required to get the tasks done. For your project team to be the most efficient, each member of your team should be able to consistently achieve a state of flow while performing project tasks. Flow is a mental state where an individual is completely immersed and focused on the tasks at hand. Flow happens when there is a balance between ability level and challenge, and when there is a very clear goal.

The three biggest barriers to achieving flow are inadequate skills and/or preparation, confusion as to what the end goal is, and a lack of personal meaning in the task at hand. Make sure that your project team has the skill sets they require for their project deliverables, are able to keep their eye on the prize with clear goals, and has a personal vested interest in what it is they are doing.

Keep these tips in mind when you are safely steering your project team around barriers to speed and towards project success!

About MICHELLE LABROSSE

Michelle LaBrosse, PMP, is an entrepreneurial powerhouse with a penchant for making success easy, fun, and fast. She is the founder of Cheetah Learning, the author of the Cheetah Success Series, and a prolific blogger whose mission is to bring Project Management to the masses. Cheetah Learning is a virtual company with 100 employees, contractors, and licensees worldwide. To date, more than 30,000 people have become “Cheetahs” using Cheetah Learning’s innovative Project Management and accelerated learning techniques.

Recently honored by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), Cheetah Learning was named Professional Development Provider of the Year at the 2008 PMI® Global Congress. A dynamic keynote speaker and industry thought leader, Michelle was previously recognized by PMI as one of the 25 Most Influential Women in Project Management in the world.

Michelle’s articles have appeared in more than 100 publications and web sites around the world. Her monthly column, the Know How Network is carried by over 400 publications, and her monthly newsletter goes out to more than 50,000 people.

She is a graduate of the Harvard Business School’s Owner President Manager’s (OPM) program and also holds engineering degrees from Syracuse University and the University of Dayton.

Check out Cheetah PHAST – a great new quarterly magazine

http://www.cheetahphast.com/?page_id=17

TECHNOLOGIES AND CREATIVITY TO IMPROVE AUTISM EDUCATION IN INDIA

Great need to improve autism education in India’, say researchers Academics from the University of Birmingham are in India sharing their expertise in the area of special educational needs, and autism in particular. Typically 1 in 100 people are on the autism spectrum. While general awareness of autism has grown in India in recent times various misconceptions still exist. The public and some professionals need better understanding of what it means to have autism and how it affects people. There is also a need to share notions of  ‘best practice’ in the education of children and young people on the autism spectrum. 

Joining volunteers from the charity Hope & Compassion and colleagues from Cardiff Metropolitan University, Birmingham academics will impart skills and knowledge to people with limited access to training in autism, and introduce new technologies and equipment to help engage children who are hard to reach.  The group will be running seminars and conducting training with practitioners and parents. Additionally, they will undertake teaching sessions with children using interactive software (Reactickles and Somantics), which is specifically designed for children with autism.

The visit will also strengthen existing partnerships and create new collaborations with academics at the University of Delhi, Khalsa College, the charity Action for Autism and Pingalwara Charitable Society, as well as Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (a local government initiative for children with special educational needs and disabilities). Dr Karen Guldberg, Senior Lecturer in Autism Studies and Director of the Autism Centre for Education and Research at the University of Birmingham, said: “We hope to set up sustainable networks and partnerships and will undertake a training needs analysis with a sample of parents and teachers. This will identify how we might be able to offer meaningful, long-term partnership and support.”

Manpreet Kaur from the charity Hope & Compassion, said: It is with the help of volunteers and academics that we are now able to bring new knowledge and research into areas that normally would not cater for the various disabilities.  This enables progression and development for children, families, carers and institutions.”

Infos

The University of Birmingham was established in 1900 and was the UK’s first   civic university where students from all religions and backgrounds were accepted on an equal basis.  A founding member of the Russell Group, it is one of the United Kingdom’s internationally acclaimed research–intensive universities.  The University’s work brings people from across the world to Birmingham, including researchers and teachers and more than 4,000 international students from nearly 150 different countries.  The University of Birmingham’s engagement with India spans over 100 years.   The first Indian students came to Birmingham in 1909 to study degrees in Mining and Commerce and there are now more than 1000 Indian alumni.  The University currently has over 180 students from India studying a wide range of   subjects – at all levels from foundation to doctoral research.   The University’s India Office opened in New Delhi in 2009.  This was the first overseas office of the University of Birmingham and has been established to maintain partnerships with local providers, support the alumni in India, further consolidate research collaborations and provide local services to those students who wish to study at the University.  For further information please visit: www.birmingham.ac.uk

Hope & Compassion is a charity that works with other organisations abroad to improve the lives of children with special educational needs and their families living in poverty in developing countries. At the heart of Hope and   Compassion is a team of experienced professionals from the UK, qualified in education and specialist therapies. The countries abroad where we are working have very few practitioners with equivalent qualifications, so we are sharing our skills and best practice to train project staff abroad. We work with local charities to train and educate their members of staff, giving a lasting legacy of high quality skills and experience abroad.  For further information, visit: www.hopecompassion.org

REDUCE WORKPLACE “BAH HUMBUGS”

 

This year, ensure your holiday is peaceful in the workplace with these tips on reducing workplace conflict.

 

By Michelle LaBrosse PMP®, Chief Cheetah and Founder of Cheetah Learning and Kristen LaBrosse, CAPM®, Co-Author

 The holiday season is like a magnifying glass that enlarges both the best and the worst in us. This time of year induces joy, caring, and generosity, but it can also magnify stress, anxiety, and heighten conflict at home and in the office.

 The holidays can be stressful. You’ve seen it others around you. Negative Nick is sitting alone under the mistletoe pouting at the office holiday party. Stressed out Susan is in the finance department worrying about pleasing her five kids who want the latest and greatest gadgets, but do not understand the word “recession.” Holiday stress is lurking in the workplace and can contribute to conflict this time of year.

 The good news is that holiday bliss is in your control. This year, ensure your holiday is peaceful in the workplace with these tips on reducing workplace conflict.

 Align Goals. Let’s say you’re decorating your house for the holiday. While you are going for fun and gaudy, your significant other is shooting for classy and elegant. As you begin the decoration process, you find that you keep butting heads on every front. What happened?

 When initiating any project, it is important for your entire project team to understand and agree on the end goal. Before kicking off a project, get your project team together to create a high-level project agreement to develop a general outline of who is going to do what, when, and what goal you are aiming to accomplish.

 Set Boundaries. You are throwing a holiday party and have invited only close friends and family. Your younger brother, who is still in college, invited all of his frat friends. The frat came to the party, ate all the food, drank all the alcohol, and stayed until two in the morning. Who’s at fault here?

 When planning a party, you need to set boundaries on what is expected of the guest (arrival and departure times), what is appropriate (bring one guest), and how each person can contribute (bring either an appetizer or a bottle of wine). The same goes for your project team at work. Define boundaries in your project team: when meetings should start and end, how you will conduct the meetings, and what everyone can contribute. When you set boundaries preemptively, you can avoid conflicts.

 Manage Expectations. During your holiday office party, you are playing a white elephant Christmas game where everyone contributes a present to the game. Some people brought gag gifts worth $5, while others spend a lot of money on really nice presents. The result? Angry stilted partygoers.

 The biggest reason for disappointment is due to expectations that fall short of reality. To reduce conflict at work, make sure you understand what other people expect from you and from the situation, and manage those expectations to result in a positive outcome.

 Get Buy-In! You’ve decided that this year, instead of getting presents for your kids, you are going to donate money to a charity in their name. Christmas morning arrives, your sleepy-eyed munchkins come bounding downstairs, sprinting towards the tree to tear apart . . . an envelope.

 People are generally not happy when changes are made without their input or buy-in. People only change when they have bought into why the change is worth it and understand why the change is a good thing. Before making drastic changes to a standardized process (like presents under the Christmas tree), focus on getting buy-in from key stakeholders.

 Make Faces. The reason that is so difficult to remain in a foul mood during the holidays is because of the looks on people’s faces. From sentimental holiday TV movies to family members excitement to be reunited with loved ones. Happiness is truly contagious.

 According to the book “Blink” by Malcolm Gladwell, your facial expressions precede your emotions. People also tend to mimic the facial expressions of others around them. Therefore, if you want to boost someone’s mood, try smiling at him or her and see what happens. Most likely they will return your grin, which will put a damper on their chagrin. At your place of work, focus on what facial expressions you’re making. It may have a bigger impact on the interactions you have with others than you think.

 So, bring it on, holiday season! Project managers are ready with open arms and smiling faces. Bah humbugs are not invited.

 ABOUT MICHELLE LABROSSE

Michelle LaBrosse, PMP, is an entrepreneurial powerhouse with a penchant for making success easy, fun, and fast. She is the founder of Cheetah Learning, the author of the Cheetah Success Series, and a prolific blogger whose mission is to bring Project Management to the masses. Cheetah Learning is a virtual company with 100 employees, contractors, and licensees worldwide. To date, more than 30,000 people have become “Cheetahs” using Cheetah Learning’s innovative Project Management and accelerated learning techniques.

Recently honored by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), Cheetah Learning was named Professional Development Provider of the Year at the 2008 PMI® Global Congress. A dynamic keynote speaker and industry thought leader, Michelle was previously recognized by PMI as one of the 25 Most Influential Women in Project Management in the world. Michelle’s articles have appeared in more than 100 publications and web sites around the world. Her monthly column, the Know How Network is carried by over 400 publications, and her monthly newsletter goes out to more than 50,000 people. 

She is a graduate of the Harvard Business School’s Owner President Manager’s (OPM) program and also holds engineering degrees from Syracuse University and the University of Dayton. 

 Check out Cheetah PHAST – a great new quarterly magazine:

http://www.cheetahphast.com/?page_id=17

 

 

WORDS WRITTEN BY BLINKINGS: THE “UPSETTING POETRY” OF ROBERTO FABBRINI, AFFECTED BY ALS

 The incredible story of a poet and theater director who is living together with the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

 

Words that come from blinkings. Words that take life and form from the soul’s deepest places. Words that flow from pain and from days, months and years marked by a terrible disease, the ALS, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. And this three letters word ironically and provocatively stands on the cover of a recent book by Roberto Fabbrini, edited by non-profit organization Osa and published by Fondazione Alberto Colonnetti. Its title is “Cantata in Sla Maggiore” (“Cantata in Major ALS”).

The book also collects the previous works that Roberto Fabbrini had published since 2006/2007: “Le ombre lunghe della sera” (“The evening’s long shadows”), “Controcanto” and “Il respiro degli angeli” (“The breath of the angels”) . The 256 pages tell – in the harsh, cruel, atrocious and vehement poetry language – the human journey of Roberto Fabbrini. Born and living in Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena, Italy), writer and theater director, lover of life and art, since 2004 Roberto is living together with ALS, a disease that attacks and destroys the motor neurons which determine the muscles movement. The book follows the same progressive “way” of Roberto, who at the beginning was still able to compose on the laptop keyboard, moving hands and fingers. Then, the progression of disability, up to total paralysis, pushes Roberto to communicate only with his eyes: special pc sensors “translate” blinkings in written words.

The eyes are the only body part that is resistant to paralysis. And the eyes become the filter, the special screen, from which Roberto’s life passes and flowes. Roberto is spectator and protagonist at the same time. A book, this one, that displaces us. It catches us off-balance. It throws us in the row of those thoughts inevitably ending in silence. Faced with searing poetry of Roberto Fabbrini – rooted in the devastation of a disease that takes away everything but the awareness and lucidity to be – there’s nothing to say, there is nothing to comment, there is nothing to whisper.

We only need the silence. The real, dark, deep, mysterious and deafening silence. The true silence, which is also expressed through the wonderful photos accompanying the poems; the images were taken by my fellow photographer Andrea Fabbrini (he’s Roberto son).

It’s only in the silence that we can hear Roberto Fabbrini’s cry. A chilling, hard, upsetting and poignant cry, which echoes from page to page. A cry that creates pain. A suffering voice that creates a “controcanto”. These are the thoughts that the great Italian author Andrea Camilleri wrote introducing “Controcanto” chapter: “I was really striked by the term “contro” (it means “against”, in Italian). In Roberto Fabbrini condition, being “against” could easily and perhaps naively be interpreted like to be “against” his illness, his misfortune, as poet Leopardi says. But the amazing thing it is that – thanks to this “against” – Roberto lyrically got rid of prisons of his body and he was able to draw, from this experience, a positive message for everyone. “

It’s true. Though he’s imprisoned in his ALS disease – relentless and inexorable disease – Roberto Fabbrini screams his humanity as a free man. A scream without a voice. A scream that has the lightness of an eyelid beat. A scream that leaves us stunned and, for this, even more conscious.

Roberto Alborghetti

“CORRIERE DI SIENA” newspaper has published (Decembre 11, 2011) ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI’S article dedicated to ROBERTO FABBRINI ‘s POETRY

IL CORRIERE DI SIENA (11 dicembre) ha pubblicato l’articolo di Roberto Alborghetti dedicato a Roberto Fabbrini

PAROLE SCRITTE CON LE PALPEBRE: LA SCONVOLGENTE POESIA DI ROBERTO FABBRINI, PARALIZZATO DALLA SLA

Parole che nascono da un battito di palpebre. Parole che prendono vita e forma nei mendri più profondi dell’anima. Parole che sgorgano dal dolore, dai giorni, dai mesi e dagli anni di una malattia, la SLA, sclerosi laterale amiotrofica. Ed è proprio alla SLA che queste parole si collegano, fin dal titolo – “Cantata in SLA Maggiore”– che campeggia ironicamente e serenamente provocatorio, sulla copertina di un recente volume di Roberto Fabbrini, curato da Osa Onlus ed edito dalla Fondazione Alberto Colonnetti. Un libro che raccoglie anche i precedenti volumi che Roberto Fabbrini aveva pubblicato a partire dal 2006/2007: “Le ombre lunghe della sera”, “Controcanto”, “Il respiro degli angeli”.

Le 256 pagine raccontano, con il linguaggio della poesia – cruda, crudele, atroce e veemente – l’itinerario umano di Roberto Fabbrini. Originario e residente ad Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena), scrittore e regista teatrale, innamorato della vita e dell’arte, Roberto dal 2004 convive con la SLA, malattia che aggredisce e distrugge i motoneuroni che determinano il movimento dei nostri muscoli. Il volume segue progressivamente lo stesso “cammino” di Roberto, che all’inizio riesce ancora a comporre sulla tastiera del computer, muovendo mani e dita. Poi, la progressione dell’infermità, fino alla totale paralisi, spinge Roberto a comunicare solo con lo sguardo, percepito dai particolari sensori di un pc che “traducono” in parole scritte i battiti delle sue palpebre. Gli occhi sono l’unica parte del corpo che resiste alla paralisi. E gli occhi diventano il filtro, lo schermo speciale, da cui passa e transita la vita di Roberto, spettatore e protagonista allo stesso tempo.

Un libro, questo, che spiazza, che prende in contropiede, che scaraventa nel girone di quei pensieri che inevitabilmente si concludono nel silenzio. Di fronte alla lancinante poesia di Roberto Fabbrini – radicata nella devastazione di una malattia che toglie tutto, ma non la consapevolezza e la lucidità di essere – non c’è nulla da dire, non c’è nulla da commentare, non c’è nulla da sussurrare.

Serve solo il silenzio, quello vero, cupo, profondo, misterioso e assordante, come è solo il vero silenzio: lo esprimono anche le stupende fotografie che accompagnano le composizioni poetiche, immagini fotografiche scattate dall’amico Andrea Fabbrini, figlio di Roberto. Ed è solo nel silenzio che possiamo udire il grido di Roberto Fabbrini: risuona di pagina in pagina, agghiacciante, duro, sconvolgente e struggente. Un grido che è dolore e crea dolore. Un grido che si fa canto e controcanto, appunto. Giungono a proposito le parole dello scrittore Andrea Camilleri che nella prefazione a “Controcanto” scrive: “Questo “Controcanto” mi ha veramente colpito. Mi ha colpito proprio il “contro”. Nelle sue condizioni il contro potrebbe facilmente e forse ingenuamente essere interpretato come un “contro” verso la sua malattia, la sua sfortuna alla Leopardi, diciamo. Invece la cosa sorprendente è proprio che grazie a questo “contro” si è riuscito a sbarazzare liricamente delle sue prigioni corporee ed è riuscito a trarre da questa esperienza un messaggio positivo per tutti.”

E’ vero: pur imprigionato nella malattia – una malattia implacabile ed inesorabile – Roberto Fabbrini urla la sua umanità di uomo libero. Un urlo senza voce. Un urlo che ha la levità di un battito di palpebre. Un urlo che ci lascia attoniti e, proprio per questo, anche più coscienti.

Roberto Alborghetti

Se vuoi, puoi lasciare il tuo messaggio per Roberto Fabbrini.

 

 

HERE’S TO YOUR (AND YOUR PROJECT’S) HEALTH

 

 

By Michelle LaBrosse, PMP®, Chief Cheetah and Founder of Cheetah Learning, and Kristen LaBrosse, Co-Author, CAPM®

It is a basic concept, but it is something that many of us have forgotten how to achieve in our ever-busier lives. It is a frame of mind that can be all too quickly brushed aside in the name of efficiency, career advancement, or other obligations. What is this illusive concept that I am referring to? WELLNESS!

Wellness has been on the backburner for many professionals striving to make

careers for themselves in their chosen profession. These people may have been under the notion that in order to be the best they had to give up their personal needs. Things like rest, exercise, and time with family and friends were thrown by the wayside in order to reap the benefits of hard work in a career. Finally, there is a new wave of individuals who are challenging this way of life and are claiming their rights to wellness.

I recently received an email from Mike Lamitola, PMP®. Mike wrote to me in

appreciation of Cheetah’s article, published in the Cheetah PHAST Magazine

(www.cheetahphast.com), entitled “Wellness Buddies.” Here is part of what Mike had to say: “I went through the Cheetah Exam Prep course with Jeff Allen and was so impressed that Cheetah used nutrition and basic yoga/breathing exercises to help increase alertness and mental clarity. After 12 years working in the construction industry and living the business professional life I’ve had some eye opening experiences and have seen some serious struggles with fellow coworkers. I became such a huge advocate for health and wellness that I decided it was time to move in a new direction that was calling me.”

Mike’s new direction was to enter the wellness profession as a Health Coach/Nutrition Counselor through a company that he and his wife started called “Welcome to Wellness!” (welcometowellnessnow.com). In his website, Mike says: ”Life is a series of projects. Some big, some small and some all happening at the same time. We need to make time within these projects to focus on our well being.”

So, how do you make time to maintain your health to ensure that you are successful in all of your endeavors, including being the best project manager you can be? The good news is that a lot of the same ideals that are followed to maintain optimum health can be translated to project success. Follow the tips below to achieve ultimate health, for you and your projects.

Plan for Longevity. How many of you start a project, planning on failure? If you do that, you will be out of a job quicker than you can say “negative Nick.” Likewise, when you begin a wellness plan, you need to think about the future you, 10 years down the road, and have positive expectancy. What activities and habits can you form today that will benefit your wellbeing? What activities can you eliminate that will ultimately cause harm? In order to enhance the quality of your life, realize that every day counts toward your wellness goals, and set up your day-to-day actions with the mindset of achieving a lifetime of healthy living.

While projects are usually shorter than a lifetime, the same philosophy applies. While working on your project day-in and day-out, keep your end goal in mind. Don’t let daily hiccups deter you from your project’s end goal. When you plan for longevity you give yourself, and your projects, a life force that can pull you, and your projects, through hard times.

Live in the Moment. Being present with our surrounding and ourselves is easier said than done. When there is all that noise running through your mind, you may find yourself saying, “Excuse me, what did you say?” far too often. An important part of your wellness is to be present in each and every moment, because the past events and future possibilities are inconsequential compared to what is happening in the here and now.

This practice can be greatly beneficial to the projects you work on as well. Instead of getting lost in the anxiety that can comes with worrying about what might go wrong in the project tomorrow, or how stupid that mistake was that you made yesterday, focus on the task at hand and what needs to get done today. By being fully present in your project tasks, you are better able to perform them correctly with clarity and confidence.

Stakeholder Buy-In. As a project manager, you are the master of communicating with stakeholders and ensuring the project you are working on is meeting the needs of the various stakeholders in order to get their buy-in. Use these same skills in your wellness project, and treat yourself as the primary stakeholder. Analyze what your needs and wants are to maintain your wellness goal, and recognize other stakeholders that might be involved with you achieving wellness. For example, your stakeholder might be your significant other, and the buy-in might be to cook dinner every other night so that you can work out after you get home from work. When you get buy-in from all stakeholders, you have set up their expectations of you appropriately, and are more likely to achieve your wellness goals.

Celebrate Progressive Achievements. When you have achieved a wellness goalcelebrate! After all, you worked hard for it, and will be more motivated to achieve greater states of wellness if you take the time to acknowledge your efforts and awesomeness. This is also true for your project team. When your team members, either individually or as a group, accomplish a major project milestone, don’t let it go by unnoticed. Celebrating intermittent achievements fuels the fire for the entire project.

After you read this article, take a moment to evaluate your own wellness goals and how you are achieving them. If you are not where you want to be in terms of wellness, find out what the specific barriers are that are keeping you from getting there. You are, after all, a resourceful project manager that procures resources when needed, manages and communicates with important stakeholders, and brings a project from start to successful finish. Use your skills today for the biggest project of your life: your wellness project.

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Michelle LaBrosse, PMP, is an entrepreneurial powerhouse with a penchant for making success easy, fun, and fast. She is the founder of Cheetah Learning, the author of the Cheetah Success Series, and a prolific blogger whose mission is to bring Project Management to the masses. Cheetah Learning is a virtual company with 100 employees, contractors, and licensees worldwide. To date, more than 30,000 people have become “Cheetahs” using Cheetah Learning’s innovative Project Management and accelerated learning

techniques. Recently honored by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), Cheetah Learning was named Professional Development Provider of the Year at the 2008 PMI® Global Congress. A dynamic keynote speaker and industry thought leader, Michelle was previously recognized by PMI as one of the 25 Most Influential Women in Project Management in the world. Michelle’s articles have appeared in more than 100 publications and Web sites around the world. Her monthly column, the Know How Network is carried by more than 400 publications, and her monthly newsletter goes out to more than 50,000 people. She is a graduate of the Harvard Business School’s Owner President Manager’s (OPM) program and also holds engineering degrees from Syracuse University and the University of Dayton.

 

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