FROM SAHARA TO TIBET: IN ROME THE LARGEST RETROSPECTIVE DEVOTED TO GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER KAZUYOSHI NOMACHI

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF PRESS OFFICE / “NOMACHI:LE VIE DEL SACRO” EXHIBITION,  2013-2014, ROME.

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“Kazuyoshi Nomachi: Le Vie del Sacro” (The Ways of the Sacred) is the title of a great show hosted in Rome (Italy) at La Pelanda, Centro di Produzione Culturale, Piazza Orazio Giustiniani 4, from December 14, 2013 to May 4, 2014. 

The exhibition is described as the largest retrospective devoted to Kazuyoshi Nomachi as well as the first time that the work of Japanese photographer has been exhibited in the West. There are about 200 images in the exhibition which is divided into seven sections spanning the photographer’s 40-year career. Nomachi has documented various peoples and ancient traditions in some of the world’s most remote places, always obtaining a level of discretion, even sacredness in his work.

 Kazuyoshi Nomachi has always been a documentary photographer, since his first trip in the Sahara when he was twenty five years. In Africa was fascinated by the great outdoors and the strength of the people who live in such difficult environments. For over 40 years, around the theme “the prayer of the search for the sacred”, he turned his attention to the most diverse traditional cultures which            are the expression of the peoples who inhabit the lands harsher, to the four corners of the world. Nomachi was able to capture the spirituality that runs through the landscapes of unique and extraordinary beauty, where the portraits and human figures assume an absolute dignity and blend with the context in almost pictorial            compositions, dominated by a dazzling light, real and transcendental at the same time, as we admire in the wonderful exhibition in Rome.

http://www.mostranomachi.it/

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 THE SEVEN SECTIONS OF THE EXHIBITION

DESCRIBED BY KAZUYOSHI NOMACHI  

Ethiopia

Ethiopia is a land of plateaux and deserts, divided in two by the Rift Valley, where tectonic activity continues to lacerate the African continent. The country is characterized by great diversity, and the areas inhabited by man range from uplands at an altitude of 3,500 meters to desert 115 meters below sea level. Eighty-three ethnic groups live here, each holding fast to their own culture. In the midst of a “Sea of Islam”, a Christian culture, which has been passed on from generation to generation since ancient times, still survives in these isolate uplands at an average altitude of 2,500 meters. During its 3,000-year history, Ethiopia has always maintained close relations with Arabia and Palestine across the Red Sea, rather than with Black Africa. In the mountains of North Ethiopia, I have seen churches carved out of the rocks and isolated monasteries where worship is the same as it was in biblical times.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Ganges

The great river Ganges originates in the Himalayan glaciers, flows across the Indian plains for 2,500 kilometers and empties into the Bay of Bengal. This muddy river, swollen by monsoon rains, is a perennial source of irrigation for Indian agriculture, and its waters, profoundly linked to the veneration of Shiva, are worshipped. The sins of those who immerse themselves in the Ganges are washed away, and people who scatter the ashes of their dead upon its waters allow the deceased’s soul to be reborn in heaven, freed from the sufferings of reincarnation. I have visited several of the many sacred places along the banks of the river, which are always crowded with pilgrims. At the Maha Kumbh Mela festival, the main Indian religious event that astrologers have decreed should take place every 12 years, tens of millions of Hindus gather to pray, participating in ceremonies and rituals inherited from ancient India.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Islam

Islamic faith, that advocates the worship of Allah as the one God, was founded in the 7th century by Muhammad, a merchant in Mecca. One hundred years later it had taken a firm hold and expanded to constitute a vast cultural area stretching from the Iberian peninsula to India. The teachings of Islam – whose heart lies in Mecca where the Kaaba, the symbol of Allah, is located – have spread throughout the world, and today there are 1.6 billion believers. According to the Quran, all Muslims must undertake a pilgrimage to Mecca at least once in a lifetime. I had the privilege of photographing the sacred site thanks to a Saudi publisher.

The pilgrimage is the fulcrum of Islamic faith, the source of its vitality. The Shiite Muslims live mainly in Iran and the surrounding regions. Since their credo is influenced by the religious beliefs of ancient Persia, there are facets of Shiite Islam that are not evident in the strict monotheism of the Arabian Peninsula.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Sahara

The land gradually becomes more arid as you cross over the high Atlas Mountains then head south; the road leads to an extremely dry area composed of layers of sand and rock. As soon as you get past the hostile, towering rocks, you find yourself in a world of sand, sculpted in breathtaking, undulating dunes. The vast emptiness continues, even after driving for three or four days and is only broken by the green patches of the oasis.The magnitude of Sahara does not lie solely in its vastness: until a few thousand years ago, it used to be a part of a wet climate zone as can be seen from the images depicting life and animals carved in the rocks of the mountainous areas over a period of 8,000 years.

When I discovered the Sahara in 1972, I was completely captivated by it. On my return trips I felt time and again that I had perceived its true nature, which is hardly visible and seems almost hidden by a veil”.

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Nile

I was 34 years old when, in October 1980, I began exploring the Nile in a jeep that I had brought from Europe. The diverse nature and the people along the Nile absolutely enchanted me. I was particularly fascinated by a tribe of herdsmen living with their animals, like they did in prehistoric times, in South Sudan. Sadly, this region has been turned into a wasteland by the endless civil war and the famine that began in 1983. When South Sudan gained independence in 2011, I had a great desire to see what had happened to that tribe of breeders with my own eyes. After 32 years, I stood again in the endless wilderness where livestock and men coexist. Despite the fact that modern civilization has now penetrated the remotest regions in Africa, the lifestyle of these herdsmen has basically remained the same: they still live amidst the smoke from burning cow dung to ward off the mosquitoes.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Tibet

My first travels to Tibet date to the end of the 1980s. The Tibetan plateau stretches into the heart of Asia, way beyond the Himalayas. The average altitude is 3,500 meters in these cold uplands, where vegetation is scant.

The people survive on pasturage and make their living raising yak, which are acclimatized to the high altitude. Tibet is a devout Buddhist country. After inheriting Buddhism from India, Tibetans deepened it through their unique sensitivity and their view of life, forged by the harshness of a rigid climate. In contrast to other Buddhist countries, where the religion became vulgarized over time and gradually distanced itself from the original form, the Tibetans have shaped their society through the enrichment of Buddhist teachings founded on the theory of reincarnation. Western countries now refer to Tibetan Buddhism as ‘the’ Buddhism. This is partly due to the Tibetans’ optimism and gentleness, which stem from their belief in the equality of life, nurtured by the finite ecology of Tibet and the Himalayas.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Andes

The North and south Americas were cut off from Eurasia until Columbus discovered the ‘new continents’, while the original Inca culture had expanded to the high Andes in the South American continent: however, when the Spanish arrived there in the 16th century, the vast Inca empire was destroyed in a flash. It was a tragic encounter between the strongest nation in the world, which sailed across the Atlantic to colonize the Inca, and a people who had no knowledge of the outside world. The Spanish conquerors forced a part of the population of the Andes to convert to Christianity. The Inca secretly incorporated the traditional Inca faith in the Christian religion, transforming it into a unique form of Andes Christianity. The origin of the Quyllur Rit’i pilgrimage, on which I went in 2004, lies in the legend that Jesus Christ incarnate appeared on a high mountain near Cusco, at a place the Incas believed to be holy ground.”

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

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 ABOUT KAZUYOSHI NOMACHI

http://www.nomachi.com/index_en.html

Kazuyoshi Nomachi was born in Japan in 1946 in Kochi Prefecture. He studied  at Kochi Technical High School and started taking photographs then as a teenager. In 1969 He studied photography under Takashi Kijima. In 1971 he began his career as a freelance advertising photographer and in the next year he made his first trip to the Sahara where he was shocked to see the strong life of the people living under the harsh environment of the area. This made him to switch his career to  photojournalism.

Through his long experience at the extreme dryness of the Sahara, he gained an inspiration from the Nile which was fostered as the theme, The Nile ever lasting water flow that never dry up while running through the dryness of the Saharah. With this theme, from 1980 he started his coverage of the White Nile from the Nile Delta up to its first drip of water at an iceberg in Uganda and up the Blue Nile to its origin at the highlands of Ethiopia. The coverage of the two flows allowed him to capture the images of the strength of the environment and the people of this vast region of Africa.

Since 1988 he turned his attention to Asia. With the occasion of his coverage of the western areas of China, he got attracted with the people living at the extreme altitude of Tibet and the Buddhism. This encounter led to his visit to almost whole area of Tibetan cultural zone and initiated his visit to the origins and the whole area of the sacred Ganges which is also the roots of Hinduism from 2004 to 2008. From 1995 to 2000 Nomachi had access to the holiest city of Islam and travels for five years in Saudi Arabia, having the very opportunity to photograph the largest annual pilgrimage to Mecca and  Medina. It had been the first to document so deep and wide the miraculous pilgrimage of over 2 million Muslims towards their holy city, Mecca.

From 2002, he visited the Andes highlands, Peru and Bolivia with a theme of the blending of the catholic belief with the Inca civilization. His visit to this area still continue since then. Concentrated in 12 major anthological issues, his photographs have been published worldwide and appeared in major photo magazines, such as The National Geographic, GEO and Stern. The work carried out in the Sahara, along the Nile, in Ethiopia, Tibet and Arabia, have aroused great admiration over the years , even in Western countries and have won numerous awards, including the Annual Award of the Photographic Society of Japan in 1990 and 1997 and the Medal of Honor with Purple Ribbon in 2009.

PREVIEW: THE GREATEST BRITISH DISHES REIVENTED BY HESTON BLUMENTHAL. WATCH THE INCREDIBLE TRAILER WITH ANIMATED ARTWORK BY DAVE MCKEAN

 

 

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Bloomsbury Publishing releases an animated book trailer that brings to life the marvel of Heston Blumenthal’s new book Historic Heston which will be published 10th October 2013 (£125). The Trailer will be released via Bloomsbury’s UK, Australia and US offices simultaneously. http://youtu.be/sIzQ-cjep5I

As the Big Fat Duck Cookbook brought together Heston’s unique story and creative journey behind the dishes at his three Michelin starred The Fat Duck restaurant in Bray, Historic Heston will reveal for the first time his years of research into Britain’s historic gastronomic past that resulted in iconic dishes such as Meat Fruit that can be found on the menu at his restaurant Dinner by Heston Blumenthal which is ranked 7th in the World’s 50 Best Restaurants.

Historic Heston charts a quest for identity through the best of British cooking that stretches from medieval to late-Victorian recipes.

“This animation really brings the whole energy of the book to life.  It’s such a multiple layered book with photography reminiscent of oil on canvas old masters, sitting alongside state of the art modern imagery with Dave’s incredible illustrations weaving the whole story together. There is such an enormous amount of work and research in this book but it has been written in a very accessible way and this animation creates an exciting dynamic that really captures the energy of our work. It was great to work with such incredibly talented people and on a topic I am so consumed by and proud of, our British gastronomic heritage.” Heston Blumenthal

“I always thought this was going to be a magical book, and here’s the proof! This trailer accurately recreates the delirious ride your mind and taste buds will take into Heston’s imagination and culinary lateral thinking. Oh, and it’s got some of my pictures in it as well. I loved illustrating this book. Heston’s world is poised beautifully between the historical research and technical rigor of his cooking, and the vaulting imagination and sheer fun of his personality. That makes for a thoroughly creative space to play.” Dave McKean

The makers of the trailer: Pete&Tom are a London-based motion graphics studio creating bold and arresting content underpinned by a love of storytelling. Their previous work includes TV rebrands for Film4, 4Music and Discovery History, animated commercials for Orange/4Music and a number of title sequence packages for popular TV programmes.

Heston Blumenthal is entirely self-taught, and is the most progressive chef of his generation. In 2004 he won the coveted three Michelin stars in near-record time for his restaurant The Fat Duck. It has repeatedly been voted into the top ten of the World’s Best Restaurants by an international panel of 800 experts, as has his second restaurant Dinner by Heston Blumenthal. In 2006 he was awarded an OBE by Her Majesty The Queen for his services to British Gastronomy.

Dave McKean has illustrated and designed over 50 books by Heston Blumenthal, John Cale, Stephen King, Richard Dawkins, Ray Bradbury, Neil Gaiman amongst others. He has directed several short films and three features and has exhibited on three continents.

historic heston

MY TOP 10 VIDEOS 2012 AT “YOU TUBE”: AND THE WINNER IS… “GLORIOUS MORNING” (LACER/ACTIONS VISUALS + PIANO SOLO BY GENE EMERSON)

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ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI TOP TEN VIDEOS 2012 AT YOU TUBE – WATCH THE PLAYLIST

 

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI LACER/ACTIONS - IMAGES OF TORN AND DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS - FROM "GLORIOUS MORNING" CLIP

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/glorious-morning-rumis-poem-inspired-a-great-piano-solo-by-gene-emerson-in-a-clip-with-roberto-alborghetti-s-art/

THE “SECRET COLLAGES CELL” AT MY EXHIBITION AT ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS: WORK # 2 (“HE LOVES HIS CHAOS FROM A DISTANCE”)

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI - LACER/ACTIONS COLLAGES - "He Loves His Chaos From A Distance" (title from a Meredith Deerheart story), Collage on wood, 2012, 90x40

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – LACER/ACTIONS COLLAGES – “He Loves His Chaos From A Distance” (title from a Meredith Deerheart story), Collage on wood, 2012, 90×40

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“HE LOVES HIS CHAOS FROM A DISTANCE”

by Roberto Alborghetti

Title From A Story by Meredith Deerheart, Indiana, Usa

COLLAGE OF PAPER PIECES FROM

TORN AND DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS

2012, CM.90X40, framed

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This image  – a collage created with hundreds of paper pieces from torn and decomposed publicity posters – is displayed at Room #7 at Roberto Alborghetti Show (“Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”) which is taking place at Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany (Piancastagnaio, Siena, Italy); the show has been extended till January 15, 2013.

You find Room #7 in the highest place of the historic castle. It’s a sort of hidden space you have to discover at the end of your visit at the exhibition. Here are presented for the first time five and particular artworks created by Roberto Alborghetti for his “Lacer/actions” Project. This collage (“He loves his chaos from a distance”) isnpired a story by Meredith Deerheart (blogger,artist and photographer, Indiana, USA).       

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Roberto Alborghetti ‘s LaceR/Actions is a multidisciplinary project and research about the apparent chaos of ripped and decomposed publicity posters and urban/street signs. He has already collected, around the world, more than 40.000 images.

Transferred on canvas, reproduced on lithographs, collages or textiles (as pure silk), or scanned in videoclips, the details of torn and ripped posters give new life to paper lacerations and decomposition.

“AND LACER/ACTIONS KILLED PHOTOSHOP…”: MEREDITH DEERHEART REVIEW ABOUT MY WORKS ON DISPLAY AT “COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE” SHOW AT ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS IN TUSCANY (OPENING OCTOBER 6)

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – LACER/ACTIONS PROJECT – “Dancin’ Branches?” / Canvas, 2012, 70×50 / On display at “Colors of an Apocalypse” Show, Tuscany, Italy (October 6 – November 4, 2012).

People usually have doubts about the origins of my “Lacer/actions” artworks. As I like to repeat, they are realistic and natural images of torn and decomposed publicity posters I see everywhere, all around the world… People think that they are manipulations or enhanced works made with some software programs…

So, I created a collage series which will be displayed in a special room at my “ Colors Of An Apocalypse” Show, at the enchanting Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century), in the beautiful Tuscany (October 6 – November 4, 2012). They are five works I created using small paper pieces from real torn posters I collected along the streets during my wandering around the world…

Fellow blogger Meredith Deerheart had the way, in the past days, to see a preview about my collages and she wrote a story at her Blog: http://healingminds.wordpress.com/

Meredith kindly sent to me a “special review” of these collages, which represent for me a sort of funny game (and a new expression of my research). I love so much what she wrote – many thanks Meredith! – and I’m pleased to share her thoughts here…

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – LACER/ACTIONS COLLAGES – “He Loves His Chaos From A Distance” (title from a Meredith Deerheart story), Collage on wood, 2012, 90×40

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“ROBERTO, YOUR WHOLE CONCEPT

OF MAKING ART IS REVOLUTIONARY…”

Meredith Deerheart

Dear Roberto, this work (collage) is beautiful and wild.  Yes, I like it very much.  It seems to have so much energy, yet I see cheerful calm…. like breakfast at the dining room table, before children leave for school. 

I don’t see the same thing in your collage as I see in your photos. The collage has rhythm and thought worked into it, but your photos are very naked, very raw… and not self-conscious. 

I noticed that the your collage is composed, but your pictures are not “humanly composed” beyond your framing the shot with your camera.  This is very provocative because it demonstrates that you’re the composer of the collage, not the environment, so your collage has abstract qualities… but not like those left by time, and neglect. And it can’t, of course, but people don’t always know what they see until they’ve been taught to see differently.  (Have you thought of bringing in a dumpster to do a show?) 

Your whole concept of making art from industrial deconstuctionism, caught on camera, on macro scale, is revolutionary, and something that some photographers may also notice… but your shots actually capture the randomness of deconstructionism, and you let the picture tell the story.  This, I think, is what makes your work unique and hard to comprehend.  You don’t change what you see.  There’s nothing contrived, or worked in… you show what you saw.  That’s gutsy.

People aren’t used to this kind of art, yet.  It’s new.  Your results are tactile in ways that other photography often goes flat because you actually catch the flakes of paint in their true state and experience the environment while you’re shooting the pictures.  But, many people do spend hours trying to create similar results in Photoshop, preferring to manipulate images to their preconceived ideas.  They construct what the viewer sees, whereas you allow the viewer to construct their own conclusions about the pictures.  Disbelief about your work may be a result of people not being able to conceive that such beautiful art is always present, always accessible.  Folks do not look around their world.  They often don’t see… and so your work teaches them how to see something new, I think.

I recognize the deconstructed, natural lines and colors created by the elements from studying buildings and sites during architecture…I see that organic quality… and that you’ve made an art form of this kind of macro photography.

You’re years ahead of the curve, Roberto.  Maybe that’s the curse of your passion.  People hear and know Photoshop… but that’s often where the ‘knowing’ stops.  That’s what they know.  You are the leader in this venue, though.  You are the only one who knows how and what you do, at this point, and markets it.  I don’t see similar kinds of non-manipulated photography elsewhere… so no wonder people don’t understand.  Artists are teachers, and I sometimes think we must be patient with the world while they decide what they think art is all about.

The collage… it’s so cool!  And it’s not the same as your photography. People will see.

ABSTRACT STATE OF MIND / COLORS & SIGNS OF A DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTER – LACER/ACTIONS POSTCARDS # 12

ABSTRACT STATE OF MIND – ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI LACER/ACTIONS ART – LITHOGRAPH, 50X70 (FRAMED), 2009

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Abstract State Of Mind”

LaceR/Actions Project

Realistic and not manipulated image

Lithograph, 70×50 (framed)

Location: Amsterdam, 2009

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Roberto Alborghetti ‘s LaceR/Actions is a multidisciplinary project and research about the apparent chaos of ripped and decomposed posters and urban/street signs.

Transferred on canvas, reproduced on lithographs or textiles (as pure silk), or scanned in videoclips, the details of torn posters give new life to paper lacerations and decomposition, as you may see in this “postcard” reproducing one of the 40.000 images captured by Roberto Alborghetti during his research all around the world.

His next big show (“Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”) will take place at Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany, from October 6 to November 4, 2012 .

SUMMER HAIGA: « ET LE CIEL BLEU LAVANDE… » / PURUSHA HONTOY POEM + ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI ART

“Le ciel bleu lavande…” Poem by Purusha Hontoy / Artwork by Roberto Alborghetti – Lacer/actions Project – Realistic Image of a torn and decomposed publicity poster (2011).

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La Terre laboures

Ses couleurs

Et le ciel bleu lavande

Ne pleure plus

La pluie

C’est amer

Âpre

Dur

Comme le sable…sec!

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© Poem Copyright Purusha Hontoy

© Artwork Copyright Roberto Alborghetti

Image 0f Torn and Decomposed Publicity Posters 

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ABOUT PURUSHA

Purusha Hontoy est une amie des arts de la vie. Diretrice et Formatrice chez l’Ecole l’Art de Vivre.

GALERIE PURUSHA (QUEBEC, CANADA)

PURUSHA HONTOY (AT LINKEDIN)