WELCOME TO “HAIGA GALLERY”: IMAGES AND WORDS FOR A TRIP THROUGH IMAGINATION

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 Last november I posted a series of “haiga” . Fellow bloggers and lot of friends seemed to like my collaboration with musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, USA); we had previously collaborated on a music videoclip (“Linger”).

In a different kind of collaboration, fusing Joshua ‘s words with my images – realistic pics of torn posters and urban signs – we have presented four haiga (titles: Moonlit Sky, In a Spider Web, A Jar of Rainwater and No Clouds), a combination of haiku and visual art.

 Now, answering to request, I’d like to present all the haiga series in one post (you can see it on the slideshow). As usual, I took the images from ripped poster sticked on billboards or from cities walls (there are a lot of incredible “signs” to watch…). On occasion I want to thank Joshua Sellers for his beautiful poems. Let your eyes go on a fascinating trip through imagination and states of mind…

in a spider web

ABOUT HAIGA

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

No Clouds

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/28/no-clouds-poetic-verses-by-joshua-sellers-one-of-my-images-from-torn-posters/

A Jar of Rainwater

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/haiku-and-visual-art-telling-a-jar-of-rainwater/

In a Spider Web

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/14/in-a-spider-web-words-and-images-for-a-trip-trhough-perception/

Moonlit Sky

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/07/moonlit-skythe-first-haigalaceractions-by-joshua-sellers-and-roberto-alborghetti/

Links to “Linger” videoclip by Joshua Sellers and Roberto Alborghetti

Earscapes Channel

http://youtu.be/iTtli44H66w

Lacer/azioni Channel

http://youtu.be/lOTx5QphUjE

A LOVELY COMMENT FROM FRIEND BLOGGER “LE ARTIST BOOTS”:

http://leartisteboots.wordpress.com/2012/01/20/my-best-wishes-with-this-special-haiga/comment-page-1/#comment-193

ABOUT JOSHUA SELLERS

Joshua Sellers has attended the University of Louisiana at Monroe studying music composition.  Over the years, Joshua has worked as a performer, songwriter, producer, engineer, DJ and musical collaborator in classical, rock, folk, jazz, avant-garde, electronica and ambient music.  As a member of the pop-rock duo Joker, Joshua released the album Homecoming in 2009.

In addition to musical projects, Joshua Sellers has been given an arts grant by the state of Louisiana for a poetry reading at the Masur Museum of Art (1996).  Joshua has also been a co-editor of Hart Beats, a journal of philosophy and spirituality published in Monroe (1996-1998).
Joshua has long been fascinated with the sound textures.  As a child, he would play with tape recorders, altering the tape speed or running the tape in reverse.  Joshua Sellers: “I discovered that you could use a recording device not simply to document sound, but to create unique sounds never heard before.”

Reviving his interest in these childhood experiments, Joshua first began recording ambient music under the pseudonym Murmur in 2003.  Rather than rely on the latest state-of-the-art synthesisers, Joshua uses found sounds, toy keyboards, electric guitars and shakuhachi as sound sources.
Joshua Sellers: “In music, we place traditional musical elements like rhythm, melody and harmony in the foreground and so we tend to not notice the actual texture as much.  In my music, that’s a perception I want to reverse.”
In 2010, Joshua Sellers completed his first full-length album of ambient music, Amniosis.  A new EP, State of Flux, is due to be released later in 2011, followed by a large-scale work, Elemental. Joshua Sellers: “I like to think of my pieces as enigmatic abstract icons, each providing a quiet meditative space and luminous presence of its own.”

Joshua Sellers currently lives in West Memphis, Arkansas, with future plans to emigrate to New Zealand.

www.earscapes.com

ABOUT ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

Professional reporter, author and visual artist, Roberto Alborghetti has written more than thirty books (biographies, interviews, stories). He worked in magazines and newspapers and produced Tv documentaries. Editor in chief of magazines concerning didactic, education, edutainment and media literacy, he leads workshops and conferences. He has won important journalism Prizes, such as Premio Acqui Terme, Premio Beppe Viola, Premio Anmil Safety in Work. He is the unique Italian reporter who received the European Award for Environmental Reporting, the so called European “Pulitzer” about Environmental Reporting (1992, European Parliament, Strasbourg).

He created “LaceR/Actions”, a multidisciplinary project concerning in a research about torn posters and urban “signs” taken from city walls. Impressed by photocamera and transferred on canvas, reproduced on lithographs or textiles, or scanned in a videoclip, the details of torn advertisings give new life to paper wastes.

In 2009, he published a “booklet-portfolio” – “Lacer/actions, Pics of torn (publi)city – gathering a selection of 40 pictures chosen among 30.000 pics that Roberto Alborghetti took during his research about torn (publi)city. In July 2010, thirty thousand people visited his show “The Four Elements of LaceR/Actions” at Oriocenter (Milano Bergamo Orio International Airport). Roberto Alborghetti’s pics are also taking part of experiences about sensorial and emotional perception (sinestesys) concerning kinesiologic tests. Alborghetti is also invited to lead workshops about his artworks.

In October 2011, he participated at Parallax Art Fair in London (La Galleria, Royal Opera Arcade, Pall Mall). He showed 3 artworks (mixed media/canvas): “Nine Eleven/New York 2001, Victims & Martyrs, The Blood Track #2”, “As fast running water…”, “I don’t like to stand still”. The famous “The Huffington Post” (September 2011) wrote about his artwork devoted to Nine Eleven Fallen; article by dr. Srini Pillay, Psychiatrist, Harvard clinician, brain imaging researcher, executive coach, author (Life Unlocked, The Science behind the Law of Attraction, Your Brain and Business: the Neuroscience of the Great Leaders).

One of his recent works was selected to be part of the new Contemporary Art Museum projected and created in in Italy (Marche region) by the artist Pasquale Martini.

He created more than 40 videoclips posted at his YouTube channel.

 Art critics and experts said that Roberto Alborghetti’s art has an “exceptional and evocative dynamic”, “a strong power of language”; it shows “new points of observation that overwhelm canonical trial systems”, “breaking the current patterns of visual art.” Alborghetti’s Artworks “are explosions of color, passion, joy, sorrow, story, emotion, beauty, love…”, “They touch us on the raw and go straight to the heart”, ” a provocation to our eyes and to our mind”.

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2011 TOP 10 VIDEOS AT YOUTUBE “LACER/AZIONI” CHANNEL

 

 

This is the chart about the Top 10 videos that in 2011 gained the highest number of views at my YouTube Lacer/azioni channel. At the top we see the clip inspired by Srini Pillay‘s words about art and the art’s healing power; Srini Pillay is Harvard psychiatrist, columnist (The Huffington Post and Psychology Today), brain imaging researcher, author (his book “Life Unlocked” ispired the videoclip at 4th position too).

At the second position: the clip I created remembering Nine Eleven Fallen in the 10th Anniversary of Twin Towers attack. At the third place: the video about my show at Parallax AF in London.

It’s also a pleasure to see in this 2011 chart the “Linger” clip created with poet, musician and producer Joshua Sellers (West Memphis, Arkansas) and that one made with the Amsterdam based musician and composer JapJap (“The ever expanding light”). All the clips are created with my “Lacer/actions” artworks, images of torn posters. Click and enjoy them!

2011 TOP 10 VIDEOS AT YOUTUBE LACER/AZIONI CHANNEL 

1.LACER/ACTIONS AND LIFE / SRINI PILLAY’S WORDS

http://youtu.be/FKSyUzhBSQQ

2.NINE ELEVEN / NEW YORK

http://youtu.be/_e_xNdQw7u8

3.LACER/ACTIONS at PARALLAX AF LONDON

http://youtu.be/r735Hb2NdnA

4.LIFE UNLOCKED

http://youtu.be/4n4JVnuIp2I

5.A STORY TO TELL: FROM RUBBISH TO SILK

http://youtu.be/M3ZQYB7r2sQ

6.THE EVER EXPANDING LIGHT

http://youtu.be/8g_Vuo1HEzY

7.LINGER

http://youtu.be/lOTx5QphUjE

8.THE LACER/ACTIONS SHOWROOM

http://youtu.be/k75rlHNnhHM

9. RADIATIONS (CLEAR-NU-CLEAR)

http://youtu.be/hpTfyQx5-FU

10.LACER/ACTIONS OF LONDON

http://youtu.be/ShJ_j-s06Go

NO CLOUDS: POETIC VERSES BY JOSHUA SELLERS + ONE OF MY IMAGES FROM TORN POSTERS

Joshua Sellers words fused in Roberto Alborghetti’s Lacer/actions artworks: it’s an HAIGA

 

No clouds

the wind revealed

in tall grasses

 

Nessuna nuvola

il vento rivelato

nelle erbe alte

 

Pas des nuages

le vent révélè

dans les hautes herbes

 

Ninguna nube

el viento revelado

en las hierbas altas

 

No clouds” is another result of my collaboration with musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, USA). We had previously collaborated on a music video, for “Linger.” Now, in a different kind of collaboration, fusing Joshua ‘s words this time with my images – realistic pics of torn posters and urban signs – , we have presented a series of haiga: a combination of haiku and visual art. Here is the fourth of a series we have created so far. Poetry and my “Lacer/actions” artworks for a fascinating trip through imagination and states of mind… I took this image from a billboard’s ripped poster. Maybe unbelievable, but it’s true. ( 4 )

 

ABOUT HAIGA

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

 

Watch the previous Haiga:

 A Jar of Rainwater: the third Haiga+Lacer/actions art:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/haiku-and-visual-art-telling-a-jar-of-rainwater/

 

 

In a Spider Web: the second Haiga+Lacer/actions art:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/14/in-a-spider-web-words-and-images-for-a-trip-trhough-perception/

 

 

 

Moonlit Sky: the first Haiga+Lacer/actions art:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/07/moonlit-skythe-first-haigalaceractions-by-joshua-sellers-and-roberto-alborghetti/

 

 

Links to “Linger” videoclip by Joshua Sellers and Roberto Alborghetti

 

Earscapes Channel

http://youtu.be/iTtli44H66w

 

Lacer/azioni Channel

http://youtu.be/lOTx5QphUjE

 

 

HAIKU AND VISUAL ART TELLING “A JAR OF RAINWATER”

 Joshua Sellers words fused in Roberto Alborghetti’s Lacer/actions artworks: this is an Haiga

 

A jar of rainwater

clouds drifting

two or three

 

Una brocca di pioggia

si lasciano sospingere

due o tre nuvole

 

Une broc de pluie

se laissent pousser

deux ou trois nues

 

Une jarro de lluvia

se dejan transportar

dos o tres nubes

 

This is the third step of my collaboration with musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, USA). We had previously collaborated on a music video, for “Linger.” Now, in a different kind of collaboration, fusing Joshua ‘s words this time with my images – realistic pics of torn posters and urban signs – , we are presenting a series of haiga: a combination of haiku and visual art. Here is the third of a series of four we have created so far. Poetry and my “Lacer/actions” artworks for a fascinating trip through imagination and states of mind… I took this image from a ripped poster sticked on the wall. ( 3 – To be continued)

 

ABOUT HAIGA

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

 

 

In a Spider Web: the second Haiga+Lacer/actions art:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/14/in-a-spider-web-words-and-images-for-a-trip-trhough-perception/

 

 

 

Moonlit Sky: the first Haiga+Lacer/actions art:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/07/moonlit-skythe-first-haigalaceractions-by-joshua-sellers-and-roberto-alborghetti/

 

 

Links to “Linger” videoclip by Joshua Sellers and Roberto Alborghetti

 

Earscapes Channel

http://youtu.be/iTtli44H66w

 

Lacer/azioni Channel

http://youtu.be/lOTx5QphUjE

 

 

IN A SPIDER WEB: WORDS AND IMAGES FOR A TRIP THROUGH PERCEPTION

Joshua Sellers Haiga fused in Roberto Alborghetti’s Lacer/actions

In a spider web

cherry blossom petals

twilight breeze

*

In una tela del ragno

petali di fiore di ciliegio

brezza del crepuscolo

*

Dans une toile de l’araignée

pétales du fleur de cerisier

brise du crépuscule

*

En la telaraňa

petalos de la flor de cerezo

brisa del crepusculo

*

 Musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers and I had previously collaborated on a music video, for “Linger.” Now, in a different kind of collaboration, fusing Joshua ‘s words this time with my images – realistic pics of torn posters and urban signs – , we are presenting a series of haiga: a combination of haiku and visual art. Here is the second of a series of four we have created so far. Poetry and my “Lacer/actions” artworks for a fascinating trip through imagination and states of mind… This image isn’t a detail of a ripped poster, but a particular of a couch surface…

(2 – To be continued)

 ABOUT HAIGA

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

MOONLIT SKY:THE FIRST “HAIGA+LACER/ACTIONS” BY JOSHUA SELLERS AND ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

Moonlit sky

quivering crepe myrtles

et their shadows

*

Cielo dal chiaro di luna

tremolanti mirti crespi

e le loro ombre

*

Ciel au clair de lune

des tremblants myrtes crépus

et leurs ombres

*

Ciel al claro de luna

tremolantes mirtos crespos

y sus sombras

This is a new collaboration between Joshua Sellers (Arkansas, Usa) and Roberto Alborghetti (Italy) after the “Linger” videoclip. We present an unpublished series of four images in which Joshua Sellers’s Haiga meet Roberto Alborghetti’s Lacer/actions Artworks (realistic images of torn posters and urban “signs”). Poetry and visual Art for a fascinating trip through imagination and states of mind. Colors and emotions, to discover in a slowly way, by the heart side. (To be continued…)

 ABOUT HAIGA

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

Here, Haiga verses meet for the first time the abstract language of realistic images as “Lacer/actions” arts.  


ABOUT JOSHUA SELLERS

Joshua Sellers has attended the University of Louisiana at Monroe studying music composition.  Over the years, Joshua has worked as a performer, songwriter, producer, engineer, DJ and musical collaborator in classical, rock, folk, jazz, avant-garde, electronica and ambient music.  As a member of the pop-rock duo Joker, Joshua released the album Homecoming in 2009.

In addition to musical projects, Joshua Sellers has been given an arts grant by the state of Louisiana for a poetry reading at the Masur Museum of Art (1996).  Joshua has also been a co-editor of Hart Beats, a journal of philosophy and spirituality published in Monroe (1996-1998).
Joshua has long been fascinated with the sound textures.  As a child, he would play with tape recorders, altering the tape speed or running the tape in reverse.  Joshua Sellers: “I discovered that you could use a recording device not simply to document sound, but to create unique sounds never heard before.”

Reviving his interest in these childhood experiments, Joshua first began recording ambient music under the pseudonym Murmur in 2003.  Rather than rely on the latest state-of-the-art synthesisers, Joshua uses found sounds, toy keyboards, electric guitars and shakuhachi as sound sources.
Joshua Sellers: “In music, we place traditional musical elements like rhythm, melody and harmony in the foreground and so we tend to not notice the actual texture as much.  In my music, that’s a perception I want to reverse.”
In 2010, Joshua Sellers completed his first full-length album of ambient music, Amniosis.  A new EP, State of Flux, is due to be released later in 2011, followed by a large-scale work, Elemental. Joshua Sellers: “I like to think of my pieces as enigmatic abstract icons, each providing a quiet meditative space and luminous presence of its own.”

Joshua Sellers currently lives in West Memphis, Arkansas, with future plans to emigrate to New Zealand.

www.earscapes.com

 ABOUT ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

Professional reporter, author and visual artist, Roberto Alborghetti has written more than thirty books (biographies, interviews, stories). He worked in magazines and newspapers and produced Tv documentaries. Editor in chief of magazines concerning didactic, education, edutainment and media literacy, he leads workshops and conferences. He has won important journalism Prizes, such as Premio Acqui Terme, Premio Beppe Viola, Premio Anmil Safety in Work. He is the unique Italian reporter who received the European Award for Environmental Reporting, the so called European “Pulitzer” about Environmental Reporting (1992, European Parliament, Strasbourg).

He created “LaceR/Actions”, a multidisciplinary project concerning in a research about torn posters and urban “signs” taken from city walls. Impressed by photocamera and transferred on canvas, reproduced on lithographs or textiles, or scanned in a videoclip, the details of torn advertisings give new life to paper wastes.

In 2009, he published a “booklet-portfolio” – “Lacer/actions, Pics of torn (publi)city – gathering a selection of 40 pictures chosen among 30.000 pics that Roberto Alborghetti took during his research about torn (publi)city. In July 2010, thirty thousand people visited his show “The Four Elements of LaceR/Actions” at Oriocenter (Milano Bergamo Orio International Airport). Roberto Alborghetti’s pics are also taking part of experiences about sensorial and emotional perception (sinestesys) concerning kinesiologic tests. Alborghetti is also invited to lead workshops about his artworks.

In October 2011, he participated at Parallax Art Fair in London (La Galleria, Royal Opera Arcade, Pall Mall). He showed 3 artworks (mixed media/canvas): “Nine Eleven/New York 2001, Victims & Martyrs, The Blood Track #2”, “As fast running water…”, “I don’t like to stand still”. The famous “The Huffington Post” (September 2011) wrote about his artwork devoted to Nine Eleven Fallen; article by dr. Srini Pillay, Psychiatrist, Harvard clinician, brain imaging researcher, executive coach, author (Life Unlocked, The Science behind the Law of Attraction, Your Brain and Business: the Neuroscience of the Great Leaders).

One of his recent works was selected to be part of the new Contemporary Art Museum projected and created in in Italy (Marche region) by the artist Pasquale Martini. He created more than 40 videoclips posted at his YouTube channel.

DUE PAGINE DE “L’ECO DI BERGAMO” RACCONTANO LE “LACER/AZIONI” DI ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

Lo so: due pagine che parlano di te, su un quotidiano, non sono cosa di tutti i giorni. Soprattutto poi quando si riferiscono all’arte ed alla cultura. Comunque, è capitato a me. L’Eco di Bergamo – il quotidiano locale più diffuso in Italia – ha scritto di me e delle mie “Lacer/azioni” dedicandomi appunto due pagine. L’articolo è firmato da Diego Colombo, che mi ha intervistato a lungo ed ha brillantemente riportato e raccontato aspetti e realtà del mio progetto “Lacer/azioni”. Ripropongo qui alcuni passaggi del lungo ed articolato servizio, ringraziando Diego Colombo e L’Eco di Bergamo per l’attenzione che mi è stata dedicata. L’intero servizio può essere letto su L’Eco di Bergamo del 26 ottobre 2011.

  

A NEW YORK LA POP ART DI ALBORGHETTI

di Diego Colombo

 La “città strappata”. Questo il tema delle fotografie del giornalista bergamasco Roberto Alborghetti, un lavoro di ricerca sulla carta della pubblicità in diverse nazioni del mondo. Lui lo spiega così: “Dietro messaggi sbiaditi e stracciati riesce difficile pensare che possa esserci ancora “qualcosa” da vedere o scoprire. Eppure, queste immagini continuano a essere uno specchio della città che comunica e che parla. Sono le tracce e i reperti post-comunicanti di un prodotto, di un evento, di uno spettacolo, di un’idea, elementi visivi nuovi, spesso contrastanti, disarmonici, ma sempre sorprendentemente vitali”.

 Chris Barlow, uno dei più noti storici dell’arte inglesi, ha ospitato Alborghetti in una mostra a Londra, tenutasi in questo mese di ottobre. Con la sua opera sull’11 Settembre è stato invitato a far parte del Memorial & Museum di New York, di cui è stata inaugurata la prima sezione nell’occasione del decennale dell’attacco terroristico. La seconda – di cui farà parte Alborghetti – sarà aperta nell’autunno 2012. “Sono sempre stato affascinato dal mondo della comunicazione – ci spiega Alborghetti – e un tempo sul settimanale diocesano La nostra Domenica curavo una rubrica, “L’occhio e i media”, dove spesso parlavo di pubblicità, anche quella dei cartelloni per le strade. E proprio il direttore di allora, Lino Lazzari,mi ha incoraggiato ad andare avanti con le fotografie, accostando il mio linguaggio all’avanguardia della pop art. Quest’anno mi ha scritto una bellissima scheda critica, che ho tradotto in inglese e messo in Internet”. Scrive Lazzari: “Non conta la materia che viene usata per realizzare un’opera d’arte e per trasmettere positivi messaggi di umanità e’ sufficiente la capacità di servirsi anche di “strappi” di carta colorata per esaltare le caratteristiche di una realtà che si fa immagine sorprendente, suasiva, coinvolgente”. “Io fotografo un rifiuto come il manifesto strappato in attesa di essere coperto da altre affissioni – aggiunge Alborghetti – o che resta come scarto, in particolare nei quartieri più degradati, perché lì trovo le immagini più belle.”

 “A Tunisi, tre anni fa, ho preso fotografie in un mercato arabo – ricorda Alborghetti – dove avevo visto splendide combinazioni di colori sui muri azzurri degli edifici. E che paura ha avuto mia moglie, che mi osservava da lontano, quando sono stato circondato da un gruppo di arabi in atteggiamento non proprio amichevole! Le composizioni più belle si individuano quando la carta resta attaccata per mesi e subisce un processo di osmosi con l’ambiente. Con la pioggia,il sole, lo smog, la carta ha un continuo mutamento, si tira, si rattrappisce. Gli aspetti più inconsueti si scoprono quando l’acqua piovana mescola tutto, lasciando tracce incredibili, e si deve essere pronti a cogliere il momento giusto, perché non è sempre facile…”

 “Negli ultimi quindici anni – continua Alborghetti – ho coordinato diversi progetti sull’uso dei mezzi di comunicazione di massa e sulla lettura dell’immagine, tra cui workshops con allievi e docenti sui messaggi pubblicitari. E’ proprio lì che ho scoperto che la pubblicità ha un valore “post”, cioè anche dopo essere stata un momento di comunicazione. Per la verità, dai manifesti lacerati già dagli anni Cinquanta il pittore Mimmo Rotella prendeva ispirazione. E come lui altri, per esempio il francese Jacques Villeglé. Insomma, non è una novità che il cartellone pubblicitario affascini. Ma io ne ho considerato un altro aspetto: la suggestione dei colori rimasti casualmente quando l’attacchino strappa. Intanto, studiando l’arte contemporanea, ero sedotto dall’astrattismo”.

 In circa sette anni, Alborghetti raccoglie una valanga di foto, conservando trentamila negativi. Arriva la sorpresa: “Iniziando a mostrarle agli amici o durante gli workshops con gli insegnanti, mi sentivo dire che le mie immagini dei manifesti strappati erano belle. Mi hanno spinto a localizzarle, datarle, categorizzarle. Avevo scatti presi in tutto il mondo, dalla Bergamasca a New York e Los Angeles, in tutti i luoghi dove mi porta il mio lavoro di direttore di riviste specialiste nel settore della didattica e dell’educazione e di coordinatore di progetti sull’uso dei media”.

E viene il momento di farsi conoscere. “Ho costruito una quarantina di videoclip con le mie immagini di manifesti strappati tematizzandole per colore – il blu, il rosso, il nero – e conferendo un senso al mio lavoro. Li ho caricati su Internet, in YouTube, MySpace, Facebook… La prima mostra è stata a OrioCenter nel luglio 2010: il direttore del centro commerciale aveva visto le mie fotografie e mi aveva offerto lo spazio, la piazzetta che dà sull’aeroporto di Orio al Serio, per un’esposizione di una trentina di opere sul tema “Aria, acqua, terra e fuoco”. In tre giorni migliaia di persone mi hanno chiesto informazioni, chiarimenti, delucidazioni. In quell’occasione hanno parlato della mia opera i giornali, tra cui L’Eco di Bergamo, e un’agenzia internazionale, la web magazine Un mondo d’italiani

 “Anch’io all’inizio in Italia trovavo molta irrisione, sufficienza. Mi dicevano: “Hai fatto un fotomontaggio”. E poi dovevo sopportare, e ancora oggi, le reazioni della gente quando mi vede fotografare i manifesti strappati. “Lei è matto”, “Io devo passare”. A Milano sono stato anche fermato dalla Volante: stavo fotografando vicino a una caserma di carabinieri, considerata “un obiettivo militare sensibile. “Che cosa sta fotografando?”. “Vi faccio vedere che cosa ho fotografato”. Non credevano. Anche i miei amici mi facevano scherzi, si fingevano galleristi importanti che mi invitavano a delle mostre”. Per la verità anche noi, quando abbiamo vista la prima mail di Roberto Alborghetti, abbiamo pensato a uno scherzo.

Quando ho portato un mio opuscolo in una galleria di Milano, mi hanno guardato come un alieno. Ma all’estero mi hanno fatto capire che il problema non ero io, erano loro. Dobbiamo uscire dalla nostra mente ristretta, ci sta isolando”.

 Inernet regala a Alborghetti una forte visibilità: fin dall’inizio sono migliaia i contatti sul suo sito “LaceR/Azioni” su YouTube e ArtSlant. “Lacerazioni. Ho scelto questo nome perché la mia attività consiste nel leggere le lacerazioni nei manifesti, specchio delle ferite interiori presenti in ognuno di noi”. Di Alborghetti parla The Huffington Post, il prestigioso blog americano per il quale ha scritto anche il presidente Obama. L’articolo è firmato da Srini Pillay, psichiatra di Harvard, ricercatore nel campo del “brain imaging”, autore di bestsellers sulla neuroscienza, di cui in Italia è pubblicato solo un libro, La calma in tasca (editrice Newton Compton).

Pillay resta colpito in particolare dall’opera di Alborghetti dedicata all’11 Settembre, scrivendone un’analisi psicologica: “L’arte è una forma di cura/guarigione i cui effetti possono essere visibili nel cervello. Quando è bella come quella di Roberto Alborghetti, essa ci invita a rivisitare la tragedia del terrorismo, l’orrore della perdita e la bellezza della nostra capacità di recupero attraverso la nostra misteriosa vita”.

La mostra di Londra si deve allo storico dell’arte e gallerista Chris Barlow: “Ha visto in Internet le mie immagini, le ha apprezzate e mi ha invitato ad andare a Londra per tre giorni all’esposizione internazionale “Parallax” con tre opere, quella sull’11 Settembre, “As running fast water” (Come acqua che corre veloce), “I don’t like to stand still” (Non mi piace stare fermo). “Come acqua che corre veloce” è nata a Bergamo, in via XXIV Maggio in un giorno di pioggia e ora c’è chi l’accosta a Monet”.

 “Sono stato contattato da molte persone che avevano visto le mie immagini in Internet – racconta ancora con stupore, ma anche con orgoglio, Alborghetti -: poeti, musicisti, narratori. Tra questi anche Srini Pillay, che sta lavorando a un progetto internazionale sugli stati della coscienza: mi ha mandato una griglia di venti domande su come nascevano le mie opere. Quando ha ricevutole mie risposte, mi ha scritto: “Io sono un columnist di The Huffington Post, ti dedicherò un articolo sull’opera sull’11 Settembre”. Prendendo spunto dal mio racconto sull’origine di quest’immagine, ha iniziato scrivendo: “Roberto Alborghetti stava camminando lungo via Vico a Milano”. Si è vero: ero lì quando ho visto un tabellone elettorale e sono rimasto affascinata dagli strappi lasciati da un attacchino. I colori mi hanno dato subito l’impressione del sangue e del fuoco che scende dall’alto sul grigio del cemento. Quest’anno è il decimo anniversario dell’11 Settembre e ho pensato di dedicare questa immagine alle vittime”.

 Ma non è finita. “Avevo prodotto due anni fa un clip con immagini molto colorate. L’ha visto un musicista americano di hip-hop, Sweet P. Mi scrive: “Io ti do la mia musica, tu fanne un clip”. Ora sta uscendo in America con il suo primo album…” Con la musica c’è un feeling particolare. “Per un complesso americano, Tonic Sol-Fa, che canta a cappella, l’anno scorso ho costruito un video con immagini astratte che mi ricordavano il clima del Natale. Qualche mese fa ho collaborato con un musicista olandese, Jap Jap. E un musicista sperimentale di Brighton, Jonteknik, mi ha mandato una canzone e mi ha scritto: “Combinala con le tue immagini, mi piacciono moltissimo”. Ho collaborato con il progetto musicale americano “Earscapes”, di Joshua Sellers, musicista e poeta dell’Arkansas, che ha realizzato un video di nove minuti con le mie immagini (Linger) e l’ha mandato su YouTube…”

 “Chi mi commenta che solo da un italiano può nascere un’opera come la mia e mi cita il Rinascimento, così come tutta la cultura che abbiamo alle spalle e ci portiamo dentro, mi mette in crisi. Come chi mi accosta a Cy Twombly, a Josef Albers, alla pop art,  e chi dichiara che ho dimostrato che nell’arte nulla si crea e nulla si distrugge. E’ vero: io non sono un pittore, ma parecchi grandi artisti si sono ispirati ai manifesti strappati. Io ne ho la prova. Io non lavoro le immagini, non le altero, come le colgo, le immortalo. La mia opera è una provocazione. Chi vede le mie opere per la prima volta ha l’illusione che siano dei dipinti. Io devo spiegare che non lo sono…

 Le opere di Alborghetti non piacciono soltanto agli artisti. E’ stato chiamato anche da un’azienda, la Bulwark Design di Srs, di Fiorano Modenese, al centro del distretto della ceramica… E poi l’incontro con Bruno Boggia, che fornisce i disegni agli stilisti. Perché il successo di un capo dipende dai designer tessili. Boggia a Como lavora per le più affermate case di moda internazionali. Alborghetti: “Ha prodotto tre sciarpe di seta con le mie immagini, tra cui quella dedicata all’11 Settembre (Alborghetti ha intenzione di donarla a un’associazione di famiglie di caduti nell’attacco, ndr). Tre prototipi, solo per vedere l’effetto che fa il passaggio dalla carta alla seta”. “Ma c’è anche – conclude – un istituto religioso femminile che ha avuto l’idea di prendere una mia immagine come modello per una vetrata sul tema della Passione. Sono gli altri che vedono tutti questi rimandi. Per me è solo un gioco”.

Ma anche una provocazione per i nostri occhi e per la nostra mente.