TUSCANY (ITALY): THE AMAZING EMPORIUM WHERE WE MAY REDISCOVER THE SENSE OF THINGS AND TIME…

 

Photos: © Roberto Alborghetti

She is called Marcellina. And for the territories of Mount Amiata, in Tuscany, Siena Country,  she is a very important person. A sort of symbol. An institution. What Marcellina is doing? She runs a shop – Pinzi Pinzuti – along Via Cavour, in Abbadia San Salvatore, a picturesque medieval town. But it’s not correct saying “shop”. It’s a real emporium of creativity and imagination, where everything can be found, where an incredibile number of things are exposed in a cheerfully confusion, but everything at your fingertips, in a clever logic that only Marcellina knows.

Marcellina Pinzi Pinzuti is the great animator of this fascinating place, where you can travel back in time, looking for an old object, an ornament, a tin toy, an old book, a cloth, a teapot , ceramic plates, outfits, liquers, textiles, calendars, food locally produced, as the wines of the Organic Farm Pinzi Pinzuti and as the prestigious Volcano Amiata Wine bottled with the artistic label created by Mitrani Yarden and me.

Yes, it’s a magical cave, open till late, and whose lights are shed on the outside, like to recall the hasty passers. It’s impossible not to be enchanted by this place, where time seems to stand still, together with Marcellina, who welcomes you with ease, knowing how suggest you in purchases, with great discretion and kindness.

So, welcome to an unbelievable world that we thought no longer existed, because gone with the advent of technology. Here, at Marcellina shop, we can retrieve the value of the magical things. And it’s really great in these times which are running very fast and seem to drag all away, pushing us to lose the sense of the objects, the flavor of the memory.

R.A.

DSCN0654 (640x480)

Marcellina Pinzi Pinzuti with Mitrani Yarden and Roberto Alborghetti

ABOUT THE ARTISTIC LABEL FOR THE BOTTLE OF VOLCANO AMIATA WINE PINZI PINZUTI CREATED BY MITRANI YARDEN & ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2015/12/23/tuscany-italy-the-official-launch-of-the-princess-e-book-art-fashion-fairy-tales-and-a-great-volcanic-wine/

 

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(HE)ART PLACES / THE NIGHT (AND THE SILENCE) IN THE FASCINATING MEDIEVAL TUSCANY VILLAGE

© Photos by ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

The historical centre of Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena, Tuscany, Italy) is a well kept medieval fortress-village, where you may walk through incredible narrow streets and squares, all built with the local grey stone.

The castle of Abbadia is first mentioned in a document dating to 1203, which shows that the community came under the aegis of a communal hierarchy headed by a Podestà, under the political control of Orvieto. A few years later, the strenght and power of this communal organization are described in the “bill of freedom” (“Carta delle libertà”) granted in 1212 to communal chancellors by the Abbot of the San Salvatore monastery.

The pattern of settlements in the area of Abbadia was defined around the mid-XII Century, when under the pressure of external threats, the local population, up until then scattered over the surrounding countryside, came together within one large fortified settlement.

The Abbey and all the Medieval centre are telling us how Abbadia San Salvatore was important in the past. All its area is rich in history and traditions, that to a great extent can be found in documents in the old archive belonging to the monastery dedicated to the Saviour. The archive contains many references to the importance and power of the Abbey.

In Abbadia we may also admire the Servadio Theatre (1873), a tiny but fascinating place. It was built thanks to the initiative of the Carli and Gragnoli families; it is dedicated to Giacomo Servadio (XIX Century) a Florentine member of Italian Parliament, banker, musician and theatre producer. Between the end of XIX Century and the beginning of the XX, the building was the seat of a friendly Society of the workers of Abbadia, where in XIX Century quicksilver mines began their activities, now closed and presented in a museum.

“GRANDPARENTS AND GRANDCHILDREN”: IN ITALY AN INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FESTIVAL FOR ALL EUROPEAN FILM MAKERS

 

On the wake of the success of national writing techniques and short film festivals for the Schools “Unknown Pens & Videos” and of the experience of the competition “A tree for the grandchildren – Grandparents Day the OSA onlus Association, Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena,Italy) presents the first edition of the international short film festival NONNIcorti , an open competition for all Italian and European film makers on the theme of “Grandparents & Grandchildren”, promoted by the Association OSA-ONLUS in collaboration with Plant Publicity Holland and Colonnetti Foundation (Turin), Municipality of Abbadia San Salvatore, the Province of Siena Administration and OKAY! magazine.

The theme is in fact the sole condition for participation: it is a show of short films on the figure of the “grandparents”:

  • the relationship between generations,

  • the cultural and social change between generations,

  • the “life pills” to teach and to hand down to “grandchildren”,

  • the figure of the aged people in the family and in the community,

  • to redeem the value of Grandparents, to spread social and cultural messages, natural holders, to share their experiences, keeping them as a treasure and transferring them to new generations.

The short film was chosen (maximum length 15 minutes) as a form of expression to continue the link with the cultural experiences previously promoted by OSA Association, which were award-winning, both for the interest shown by the public and for the number of competitors on the whole national territory.

The short film is thus the “fil rouge” connecting the existing cultural initiatives with the new born NONNIcorti. The form of the short film was chosen for its nature of “immediate message”, for its short language, for its synthetic features, for its relatively easy production, without excessive use of money and resources, for its shortness, which makes it very usable by everybody.

The competition will take place from 15 to 20 (day of prize-giving) October 2012 in Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena, Italy).

There will be: COMMISSION award selected by local and national experts and professionals; GRANDPARENTS award selected by some grandfathers, also elderly members of the Centre “L’Incontro” in Abbadia S. S.; GRANDCHILDREN award selected by the students of the Secondary School of Abbadia S.S. ; ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK award selected by international experts and professionals

The artworks must be submitted by 30th June 2012 to OSA ONLUS Casella Postale 35 – Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena). They will be archived at the Municipal VideoCentre of Abbadia San Salvatore, in the VIDEO-MEMORY Section. The competition announcement can be found in the website www.pennesconosciute.it

For further information you can contact Plant Publicity Holland (Italian office), Charles Lansdorp tel. 0039-348-4415927, contact@colour-your-life.it or Nicola Cirocco – tel.0039- 328 4740282 – cironic@alice.it

WORDS WRITTEN BY BLINKINGS: THE “UPSETTING POETRY” OF ROBERTO FABBRINI, AFFECTED BY ALS

 The incredible story of a poet and theater director who is living together with the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

 

Words that come from blinkings. Words that take life and form from the soul’s deepest places. Words that flow from pain and from days, months and years marked by a terrible disease, the ALS, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. And this three letters word ironically and provocatively stands on the cover of a recent book by Roberto Fabbrini, edited by non-profit organization Osa and published by Fondazione Alberto Colonnetti. Its title is “Cantata in Sla Maggiore” (“Cantata in Major ALS”).

The book also collects the previous works that Roberto Fabbrini had published since 2006/2007: “Le ombre lunghe della sera” (“The evening’s long shadows”), “Controcanto” and “Il respiro degli angeli” (“The breath of the angels”) . The 256 pages tell – in the harsh, cruel, atrocious and vehement poetry language – the human journey of Roberto Fabbrini. Born and living in Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena, Italy), writer and theater director, lover of life and art, since 2004 Roberto is living together with ALS, a disease that attacks and destroys the motor neurons which determine the muscles movement. The book follows the same progressive “way” of Roberto, who at the beginning was still able to compose on the laptop keyboard, moving hands and fingers. Then, the progression of disability, up to total paralysis, pushes Roberto to communicate only with his eyes: special pc sensors “translate” blinkings in written words.

The eyes are the only body part that is resistant to paralysis. And the eyes become the filter, the special screen, from which Roberto’s life passes and flowes. Roberto is spectator and protagonist at the same time. A book, this one, that displaces us. It catches us off-balance. It throws us in the row of those thoughts inevitably ending in silence. Faced with searing poetry of Roberto Fabbrini – rooted in the devastation of a disease that takes away everything but the awareness and lucidity to be – there’s nothing to say, there is nothing to comment, there is nothing to whisper.

We only need the silence. The real, dark, deep, mysterious and deafening silence. The true silence, which is also expressed through the wonderful photos accompanying the poems; the images were taken by my fellow photographer Andrea Fabbrini (he’s Roberto son).

It’s only in the silence that we can hear Roberto Fabbrini’s cry. A chilling, hard, upsetting and poignant cry, which echoes from page to page. A cry that creates pain. A suffering voice that creates a “controcanto”. These are the thoughts that the great Italian author Andrea Camilleri wrote introducing “Controcanto” chapter: “I was really striked by the term “contro” (it means “against”, in Italian). In Roberto Fabbrini condition, being “against” could easily and perhaps naively be interpreted like to be “against” his illness, his misfortune, as poet Leopardi says. But the amazing thing it is that – thanks to this “against” – Roberto lyrically got rid of prisons of his body and he was able to draw, from this experience, a positive message for everyone. “

It’s true. Though he’s imprisoned in his ALS disease – relentless and inexorable disease – Roberto Fabbrini screams his humanity as a free man. A scream without a voice. A scream that has the lightness of an eyelid beat. A scream that leaves us stunned and, for this, even more conscious.

Roberto Alborghetti

“CORRIERE DI SIENA” newspaper has published (Decembre 11, 2011) ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI’S article dedicated to ROBERTO FABBRINI ‘s POETRY

IL CORRIERE DI SIENA (11 dicembre) ha pubblicato l’articolo di Roberto Alborghetti dedicato a Roberto Fabbrini

PAROLE SCRITTE CON LE PALPEBRE: LA SCONVOLGENTE POESIA DI ROBERTO FABBRINI, PARALIZZATO DALLA SLA

Parole che nascono da un battito di palpebre. Parole che prendono vita e forma nei mendri più profondi dell’anima. Parole che sgorgano dal dolore, dai giorni, dai mesi e dagli anni di una malattia, la SLA, sclerosi laterale amiotrofica. Ed è proprio alla SLA che queste parole si collegano, fin dal titolo – “Cantata in SLA Maggiore”– che campeggia ironicamente e serenamente provocatorio, sulla copertina di un recente volume di Roberto Fabbrini, curato da Osa Onlus ed edito dalla Fondazione Alberto Colonnetti. Un libro che raccoglie anche i precedenti volumi che Roberto Fabbrini aveva pubblicato a partire dal 2006/2007: “Le ombre lunghe della sera”, “Controcanto”, “Il respiro degli angeli”.

Le 256 pagine raccontano, con il linguaggio della poesia – cruda, crudele, atroce e veemente – l’itinerario umano di Roberto Fabbrini. Originario e residente ad Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena), scrittore e regista teatrale, innamorato della vita e dell’arte, Roberto dal 2004 convive con la SLA, malattia che aggredisce e distrugge i motoneuroni che determinano il movimento dei nostri muscoli. Il volume segue progressivamente lo stesso “cammino” di Roberto, che all’inizio riesce ancora a comporre sulla tastiera del computer, muovendo mani e dita. Poi, la progressione dell’infermità, fino alla totale paralisi, spinge Roberto a comunicare solo con lo sguardo, percepito dai particolari sensori di un pc che “traducono” in parole scritte i battiti delle sue palpebre. Gli occhi sono l’unica parte del corpo che resiste alla paralisi. E gli occhi diventano il filtro, lo schermo speciale, da cui passa e transita la vita di Roberto, spettatore e protagonista allo stesso tempo.

Un libro, questo, che spiazza, che prende in contropiede, che scaraventa nel girone di quei pensieri che inevitabilmente si concludono nel silenzio. Di fronte alla lancinante poesia di Roberto Fabbrini – radicata nella devastazione di una malattia che toglie tutto, ma non la consapevolezza e la lucidità di essere – non c’è nulla da dire, non c’è nulla da commentare, non c’è nulla da sussurrare.

Serve solo il silenzio, quello vero, cupo, profondo, misterioso e assordante, come è solo il vero silenzio: lo esprimono anche le stupende fotografie che accompagnano le composizioni poetiche, immagini fotografiche scattate dall’amico Andrea Fabbrini, figlio di Roberto. Ed è solo nel silenzio che possiamo udire il grido di Roberto Fabbrini: risuona di pagina in pagina, agghiacciante, duro, sconvolgente e struggente. Un grido che è dolore e crea dolore. Un grido che si fa canto e controcanto, appunto. Giungono a proposito le parole dello scrittore Andrea Camilleri che nella prefazione a “Controcanto” scrive: “Questo “Controcanto” mi ha veramente colpito. Mi ha colpito proprio il “contro”. Nelle sue condizioni il contro potrebbe facilmente e forse ingenuamente essere interpretato come un “contro” verso la sua malattia, la sua sfortuna alla Leopardi, diciamo. Invece la cosa sorprendente è proprio che grazie a questo “contro” si è riuscito a sbarazzare liricamente delle sue prigioni corporee ed è riuscito a trarre da questa esperienza un messaggio positivo per tutti.”

E’ vero: pur imprigionato nella malattia – una malattia implacabile ed inesorabile – Roberto Fabbrini urla la sua umanità di uomo libero. Un urlo senza voce. Un urlo che ha la levità di un battito di palpebre. Un urlo che ci lascia attoniti e, proprio per questo, anche più coscienti.

Roberto Alborghetti

Se vuoi, puoi lasciare il tuo messaggio per Roberto Fabbrini.

 

 

THAT MAGICAL CRYPT IN THE TUSCANY MEDIEVAL VILLAGE WHERE THE ITALIAN LANGUAGE WAS BORN

Abbadia San Salvatore, on Amiata Mount (Siena area, Tuscany, Italy) is a place rich of art and history… 

 

In Abbadia San Salvatore, on Amiata MountSiena area, Tuscany, Italy – there is a magical and capturing place. You find it on the ancient abbey church. It is a crypt, where you may breath the history and the beauty of one of the most fascinating Tuscany village.

According the documents, the crypt was built in VIII Century. It was restored in XX Century and now we may admire it in all its beauty. Everytime I have the way to visit it, I always feel astonished by its magic. It happened again a few days ago, when I was in Abbadia SS. for the XIII edition of “Penne and Video Sconosciuti”, the national festival for school journals and videos produced by italian schools.

The Longobard crypt shows 32 columns that form 13 small aisles. They are made in various shapes; some of them are round, with different sculpured ornaments. Also the beautiful capitals are sculptured in various shapes, as palm leaves, loto flowers or animal heads.

 

The abbey and all the Medieval centreare telling us how Abbadia San Salvatore was important in the past. All its area is rich in history and traditions, that to a great extent can be found in documents in the old archive belonging to the monastery dedicated to the Saviour at Amiata Mount. The archive contains many references to the importance and power of the abbey, but little or no reference is made to the early Medieval history of the surrounding land and area, or about the people who used to live there.

The castle of Abbadia is first mentioned in a document dating to 1203, which shows that the community was came under the aegis of a communal hierarchy headed by a Podestà, under the political control of Orvieto. A few years later, the strenght and power of this communal organization are described in the “bill of freedom” (“carta delle libertà”) granted in 1212 to communal chancellors by the Abbot of the San Salvatore monastery.

The pattern of settlements in the area of Abbadia was defined around the mid-XII Century, when under the pressure of external threats, the local population, up until then scattered over the surrounding countryside, came together within one large fortified settlement.

 

This Benedectine monastery was founded by Erfo, a Longobard nobleman, in the VIII Century, under King Astolfo, and it was dedicated to the Saviour, which was typical of that people and in the tradition of christian religion. It rose on the east side of Amiata Mount in order to reclaim the surrounding woods and forests. It also overlooked the Via Francigena, running through the Paglia Valley.

The imperial abbey greatly developed in the Carolingian period thanks to Charlemagne‘s and Ludovick‘s confirmation of its landed propertues and privileges, Around the year 1000, under Abbot Winizo, it increased its power by acquiring new territories. The church and the crypt were rebuilt in 1036. In 1228 the monastery passed to the Cistercians. It was suppressed by grand-duke Pietro Leopoldo in 1782 and re-opened later.

 

In the year 1087, a certain Miciarello and his wife Gualdrada made a donation in favour of the monastery of St Saviour. Below the donation document, the notary Ranieri signed three verses, commonly known as “Cartula Amiatina” (“The Amiata Footnote”). This extemporary poem represents to linguists the first voice of vernacular coming from Tuscany. That is, the first expressions recording the evolution of the Italian language.

But this is not the only important document about Amiata History. Till XIX Century, the monastery hosted the famous “Bibbia Amiatina”“The Amiata Bible” – which is considered the oldest latin version ever known. The Amiata Bible – a real art masterpiece, written by amanuensis monks – is now kept in Florence, but we may see a photo-reproduction in the Monastery Museum.

The historical centre is a well kept fortress-village, where you may walk through incredible narrow streets and squares, all built with the local grey stone. You may admire the Servadio Theatre (1873), a tiny but fascinating place. It was built thanks to the initiative of the Carli and Gragnoli families; it is dedicated to Giacomo Servadio (XIX Century) a Florentine member of Italian Parliament, banker, musician and theatre producer. Between the end of XIX Century and the beginning of the XX, the building was the seat of a friendly Society of the workers of Abbadia, where in XIX Century quicksilver mines began their activities, now closed and presented in a museum.

By ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI