COLORS AND EMOTIONS: THE OTHER SIDE OF AUTISM / KIDS WORKING ON “LACER/ACTIONS” (THE CLIP)

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Guest Writer: STEFANO ALBERTI

Hearty agreement and great success in Anzio (Rome) for the exhibition “Scratches, Cracks and Lacer-actions / Between dream and reality” inspired by Roberto Alborghetti artworks for the project co-ordinated and carried out by Professor Patrizia Sapri. The show was held at the  Professional Institute “Marco Gavio  ​Apicio” where a series of pictures told a journey through “special painterly colors and materials” and the singular experience involving children with disabilities and carriers of the Syndrome of Autism Spectrum. The initiative was made ​​possible thanks to the support of the Rotary Club of Roma Golfo di Anzio, Nettuno, which has included the activities in “Anzio for Autism” project .

Patrizia Sapri led with passion and enthusiasm the group of the magnificent seven little artists  who have re-composed and re-built works from “Lacer / actions” Project by Roberto Alborghetti. Kids re-viewed with their creativity images of decomposed publicity posters, natural cracks, scratches and “urban signs”. Patrizia Sapri, teacher and curator, says about the workshop: “ My job has the aim to start from the healthy part of the person and developing residual capacity. We search for a meaningful relationship between color and emotions. Limits are transformed into expressive skills, communication, art… Roberto Alborghetti works have the emotional power to establish a right condition to create and to act. Yes, my special students like so much Roberto’s colors, scratches and cracks. But don’t ask me why…”.

Colors and Emotions Atelier - Lacer-Actions by r.a (2)

 

“DON’T ASK OURSELVES WHAT KIND OF WORLD WE’LL LEAVE TO OUR CHILDREN, BUT WHAT KIND OF CHILDREN WE’LL LEAVE TO THIS WORLD”

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My new second book about Pope Francis is out now.

Its title is: “Quando il giorno era una freccia” (“When the day was an arrow”); the English translation of the book isn’t (now) available. 

Published by AGeSC, it investigates Pope Francis in relation to education, culture and school, which are “the keys to all changes and social development” (Pope Francis). 

Special presentation of the book at Rimini Meeting on next 28 August, 2014, h. 4pm. Other conferences and lectures will take place in the next weeks also in Turin, Acqui Terme, Verona, Vicenza, Treviso, Ravenna, Forlì, Siena, Rome.

Available in the best Italian bookshops and main on-line bookstores:

 Amazon:

AMAZON

 

Google Play Books:

GOOGLE PLAY BOOKS

 

IBooks:

iBOOKS

 

Kobo:

KOBO BOOKS

"Quando il giorno era una freccia", Roberto Alborghetti, AGeSC, 2014, Pag. 170

“Quando il giorno era una freccia”, Roberto Alborghetti, AGeSC, 2014, Pag. 170

PLAYING WITH COLORS / MY WORKS RE-VIEWED BY CHILDREN (3-5 YEARS OLD) DURING A FUNNY WORKSHOP

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This videoclip shows some images about the creative experience which involved children  (3-5 years old) of nursery school “Cavagnis” based in Zogno, Italy. They participated to an incredible and funny workshop dedicated to a free interpretation of four artworks by Roberto Alborghetti, the realistic, natural and random  images related to the decomposition of torn publicity posters, cracks, scratches and urban signs.

 

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Roberto Alborghetti ‘s LaceR/Actions is a multidisciplinary project and research about the apparent chaos of decomposed posters, cracks, scratches and urban/street signs. Transferred on canvases, reproduced on lithographic prints or textiles (as pure silk), re-built on collages or scanned in videoclips, the images of torn and disfigured posters and natural cracks give new meanings and expressions to paper lacerations and matter decomposition, as you may see in this gallery showing some works from the collection of about 50.000 images captured so far by Roberto Alborghetti during his research all around the world.

The most recent Roberto Alborghetti Show (“Colors of an Apocalypse: An Intrigue for the Eyes and Mind from the Decomposed Publicity Posters”) was displaced for 100 days in the enchanting Aldobrandesca Fortress (XIII Century) in Tuscany (Piancastagnaio, Siena, Italy) from October 6, 2012, to January 15, 2013. His artworks and installations are currently displayed at Contemporary Art Collection in Mercatello sul Metauro, Marche (Italy), at Fai Private Collection in Bergamo (Italy) and at “An exhibition for an art restoration” in Norcia, Umbria, Italy.

His recent projects: “Contemplations and Lacer/actions” (album, videoclip, installations, inspired by Thomas of Bergamo Scripts 1563-1631) and “Atelier of Colors and Emotions” (a project which involved autistic kids ).

AUTISM AND ART / AN EXHIBITION ABOUT THE EXPERIENCE INSPIRED BY “LACER/ACTIONS” WORKS… “SEEIN’ WHAT HUMAN BEINGS FREQUENTLY DON’T SEE”

GUEST WRITER: STEFANO ALBERTI

In last Springtime, Roberto Alborghetti works have been the focus of “Atelier of colors and emotions” project which involved in Italy (Aprilia, Latina) children with disabilities and affected by Autism Spectrum Syndrome. The activity was promoted and led by teacher Patrizia Sapri and non-profit organization “Il Senso della vita Onlus”. The experience based on Roberto images which have been reproduced manually by children. The project merged into a final exhibition tooking place some weeks ago in Tuscany (Piancastagnaio, Siena) with the title  “From Lacer/actions to Cre/actions”.

Kids worked for months on Roberto Alborghetti images, called “Lacer/actions, making some incredible works. The  exhibition in Tuscany raised lot of interest and attention comparing photographic copies of the original images by Roberto Alborghetti and the works performed by the pupils (watercolours, tempera and various materials). During the show teacher Patrizia Sapri told visitors about this unusual experience and how guys found a way to express emotions and creativity through colours and abstract from Roberto Alborghetti artworks.

The “provocative pictures” about torn and decomposed publicity posters and cracks were de-constructed and re-created by autistic kids who entered the visual world of Roberto Alborghetti receiving suggestions and emotions and re-viewing images through the sense-organs. They discovered an inner dimension to explore and learn. Music accompanied the lessons and students also created words and comments about feelings and sensations they felt while working on Roberto Alborghetti colorful works. 

Teacher Patrizia Sapri said: “The exhibition displayed works made by autistic students. I studied in the past, and rediscovered in recent days, the great lesson coming from Temple Grandin, doctor and professor at Colorado State University (USA), bestselling author and autistic activist (in 2010 she was listed in the Time 100 list of the 100 most influential people in the world, for the “Heroes” category). She said that autistics are able to see what human beings frequently don’t see. They see a “wonderful world” that people barely grasps. They perceive a series of visual stimuli that normal people can’t perceive. Autistics think in pictures. They live in a world of pictures and colors. That’s the reason why autistic kids are so fond of Roberto Alborghetti’s works which were re-created and re-lived using different tools and techniques. Based on their state of mind, they angrily painted or gently covered all spaces. In their mental order everything have to be perfect. And they have the wonderful gift to clearly see and perceive in advance – in their mind and heart – the final work.”   

DRAWINGS FOR PLANTS: 4.000 WORKS FROM ITALIAN STUDENTS ABOUT THE WONDERFUL “PLANET OF FLOWERS AND TREES”

In 2013 Flower Council Holland and Okay! review launched in Italy the 3nd edition of “The Plant I Like” with the goal to reach new generations speaking them about the world of plants and indoor plants, improving knowledges and informations. Kids from infant to secondary schools were involved in a graphic contest about green. Schools were invited to draw plants in every technique, expressing their creativity and imagination… “The Plant I Like” outcome was better than expected. Students sent to promoters more than 4.000 drawings, confirming that the invitation launched by Okay! and Flower CouncilHolland has turned into an opportunity to look around, discover and learn about the wonderful world of plants which  offer color, comfort, serenity and well-being, to people, to environment and to homes. A commission, composed by teachers and educators, selected the best drawings. The schools received a special gift: an incredible plant named “Glowing Star in the Dark” made in Holland by Amigo Plant (http://www.glowingstarinthedark.info/). This plant shines its light through the dark nights; during the day, or in artificial light, this unusual plant stores up the surrounding light, so it can radiate a lovely glow in the dark.

The best drawings were shown during a special event which took place with a huge students participation. Green culture is one of the privileged fields of Okay! magazine. In the last 14 years, with the collaboration of Flower Council Holland, activities were promoted to create new attention and interest in young people. Thousand of kids  approached the world of flowers and plants, receiving impulse to consider the importance of green for social life and for personal well-being. And now, with these thousand of drawings, we may look at the plants through the eyes and the ears of children. But also plants have eyes and ears. Those of children.

CRACKS…COMIN’ SOON…

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2nd Anniversary with WordPress

2nd Anniversary with WordPress

FROM THE BIRTHPLACE OF SHAKESPEARE A NEW INITIATIVE TO REVOLUTIONISE THE WAY THE LEGENDARY PLAYWRIGHT IS TAUGHT

 William Shakespeare

Teachers in Singapore are being supported to change their approach to teaching Shakespeare by adopting techniques used by actors and directors as part of a pioneering new project from the UK’s Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) and the University of Warwick that aims to transform classroom experiences of Shakespeare. According to research undertaken by the RSC and the British Council up to 64 million children across the world learn about Shakespeare’s plays, but for some it is not the life enriching experience it could be.

The RSC, based in Shakespeare’s birthplace in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, UK, has teamed up with Warwick Business School, which is part of the University of Warwick, UK, to change that. Together, they have produced a one-stop shop online professional development programme, called Teaching Shakespeare, that holds a treasure trove of materials including over 100 films featuring modelled lessons and interviews, with leading RSC directors and practitioners along with academics from the University of Warwick. This ground-breaking programme provides teachers with the essential skills and knowledge to develop active, drama-based approaches to teaching Shakespeare in their classrooms.

Encouraging students to get up on their feet and actively explore Shakespeare’s plays has already brought the text to life for thousands of youngsters in Britain through the work of the RSC’s Education department. This new online learning platform, created by the RSC and Warwick Business School will be able to reach millions more globally.

Now Warwick Business School Professor Jonothan Neelands is travelling to Singapore to show at first-hand how these teaching methods can not only improve children’s understanding of Shakespeare, but boost their self-confidence and communication skills as well. Professor Neelands will be holding a workshop from Saturday March 16 to March 20 at the Singapore Repertory Theatre.

Our humble ambition is to transform how Shakespeare is taught across the world,” said Professor Neelands, who is a National Teaching Fellow and Chair of Creative Education at Warwick Business School. “We find that the best way to encourage young people to develop a joy in reading Shakespeare is through getting them up on their feet, moving around, speaking the words and making the choices that actors do. The RSC’s research has shown that this approach is more likely to lead to a lifelong love of Shakespeare rather than sitting around in class and reading dusty books.”

Jacqui O’Hanlon, RSC director of education, said: “We know there is a global community of teachers that are passionate about teaching Shakespeare and who want to explore new ways of teaching in order to unlock language, inspire learning and release imagination in students of all ages. “We hope to reach thousands of teachers through our new online programme and in doing so transform classroom experiences of Shakespeare for all kinds of learners. We hope that Teaching Shakespeare enables both teachers and their students to enjoy and achieve more together in their Shakespeare work.”

English eight year-old Ben now ranks Shakespeare alongside the most exciting things in the world after taking part in one of the RSC’s classes. The Stokeinteignhead Primary School pupil said: “My dad said Shakespeare was boring, but he’s got it wrong! I’m gonna tell him about Hamlet. It’s got murders and ghosts and castles and stuff and that’s not boring.”

At Honley High School in Holmfirth in West Yorkshire, UK, teachers said: “Over 93 per cent of students were ambivalent or vehement in their belief that Shakespeare was not fun. After using theatre-based teaching over 79 per cent of students saw the study of Shakespeare as fun.”

And Lillian, a London primary school teacher in the UK, said: “After using practical approaches to Shakespeare we found the writing levels of pupils in a highly disadvantaged class had improved considerably: 86 per cent were now on target to achieve level four in their SATs. Before the Shakespeare teaching unit, only 53 per cent were on target.”

Australian teacher Kate Walsh, of Toowoomba in Queensland, said: “I teach at Harristown State High School. Studying with both the University of Warwick and the Royal Shakespeare Company has been a fantastic experience. Working within a global online classroom with great resources and supportive staff has developed my pedagogy, helping bring Shakespeare to life in a number of ways.”

Professor Neelands has given Teaching Shakespeare workshops at The Singapore Repertory Theatre from March 16 to 20.

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To visit the Teaching Shakespeare website go to http://www.teachingshakespeare.ac.uk/