ITALIAN MEDIA TALK ABOUT MY “CONTEMPLATIONS AND LACER/ACTIONS” PROJECT BASED ON SCRIPTS FROM XVI CENTURY

 IN ALTUM

L'ECO DI BERGAMO

ASIS NEWS

OKAY! MAGAZINE

Italian media are devoting a warm attention to my “Contemplations and Lacer/actions” project. Websites, newspapers and magazines talked about this visual experience which includes a virtual gallery, a videoclip, an album and installations.

The project is based on 27 scripts by Thomas From Bergamo (or From Olera) who lived from 1563 to 1631 in Tyrol area (Austria and Italy). All the scripts were taken from the most important works of Thomas, as his masterpiece “Fuoco d’Amore”, “Fire of Love” (the first issue was printed in 1682 in Aufsburg, Germany).

Thomas was a piece ambassador and messenger between European Nations in troubled and turbulent times. He was an illiterate man – he was a shepherd! – but its open heart, mind and spirit suggested him to write really stunning poems, stories and thoughts.

While I was writing his biography – (“Thomas From Bergamo: A Fire of Love along European Streets”) published in Italy last June – I was really struck by his Scripts… So, the idea of this project. I think the visionary power of Thomas Scripts fits so well with my works. As I like to say, my works are not paintings, and even graphic design created by computer, but absolutely realistic images, captured from reality, along the streets, during my research-survey on torn and decomposed publicity posters and about “signs” and “cracks” in urban environments…

Thomas From Bergamo Scripts were written along the streets, contemplating the World and its Beauties… My images comes from the streets as well as… This is the meeting point of this project. The Street, with its Lifes, Hopes, Colors and Moods.

CONTEMPLATIONS AND LACER/ACTIONS: A SPECIAL PAGE ON THE PROJECT

Advertisements

“CONTEMPLATIONS AND LACER/ACTIONS” PROJECT / A SPECIAL PAGE: SLIDESHOW, ALBUM, VIDEO AND A GREAT PORTRAIT (1631)

4

One of the 27 installations-artworks of “Contemplations and Lacer/actions” Project. This is the English translation of the original script by Thomas From Bergamo (1563-1631): “The Loving Soul, wounded in Love, loves in Every Times and Everywhere…” Work and Concept by Roberto Alborghetti – 2013

*

CONTEMPLATIONS AND LACER/ACTIONS: A SPECIAL PAGE ON THE PROJECT

*

“Contemplations and Lacer/actions” is a visual project which includes a virtual gallery, a video, an album and installations. It is based on 27 scripts by Thomas From Bergamo (or From Olera) who lived from 1563 to 1631 in Tyrol area (Austria and Italy). All the scripts were taken from the most important works of Thomas, as his masterpiece “Fuoco d’Amore”, “Fire of Love” (the first issue was printed in 1682 in Aufsburg, Germany).

Thomas was a peace ambassador and messenger between European Nations in troubled and turbulent times. He was an illiterate man – he was a shepherd! – but its open heart, mind and spirit suggested him to write really stunning poems, stories and thoughts.

While I was writing his biography – (“Thomas From Bergamo: A Fire of Love along European Streets”) published in Italy last June – I was really struck by his Scripts… So, the idea of this project. I think the visionary power of  Thomas Scripts fits so well with my works. As I like to say, my works are not paintings, and even graphic design created by computer, but absolutely realistic images, captured from reality, along the streets, during my research-survey on torn and decomposed publicity posters and about “signs” and “cracks” in urban environments…

Thomas From Bergamo Scripts were written along the streets, contemplating the World and its Beauties… My images comes from the streets as well as… This is the meeting point of this project. The Street, with its Lifes, Hopes, Colors and Moods.

About Thomas: I invite you to admire his great and touching portrait. It was painted in 1631 by artist Martin Theophile Polak (or Martin Teofilowicz). Polak was one the most popular Tyrolese painter between XVI and XVII Century. He also worked at Hapsburg Court. The archduke Leopold sent him to Innsbruck to portray the dying Thomas (May 3, 1631). I think Polak painted one of his masterpieces. He was so able to impress and to imprint on canvas the stately mildness and the inner light of a great man.       

R.A.

 ***

CONTEMPLATIONS AND LACER/ACTIONS: A SPECIAL PAGE ON THE PROJECT

HEIRS OF PAUL VON MENDELSSOHN-BARTHOLDY FILE SUIT AGAINST THE GERMAN STATE OF BAVARIA TO RECOVER PICASSO ‘S MADAME SOLER LOST IN NAZI PERSECUTION

PABLO PICASSO, "MADAME SOLER"

PABLO PICASSO, “MADAME SOLER”

The heirs of Paul von Mendelssohn-Bartholdy – a prominent Berlin Banker of Jewish descent who suffered Nazi persecution – announce that they have filed suit against the German State of Bavaria in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York to recover an iconic oil painting by Pablo Picasso, entitled Madame Soler (1903) from the artist’s “blue period.” (See Julius H. Schoeps, et al. v. State of Bavaria, 1:13-cv-02048-UA.)

The Mendelssohn heirs base their claim upon well-developed historical facts, the bona fides of which the federal court in Manhattan credited several years ago in a closely related case. (See Julius H. Schoeps, et al. v. Museum of Modern Art, 594 F. Supp.2d 461, 466 – S.D.N.Y. 2009).

1. Paul von Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s loss of Madame Soler due to Nazi persecution

The Nazis took power in Germany on January 31, 1933 with a transparent agenda to exclude Jews – and Jewish banks and bankers especially – from the economy of Germany and to compel them to forfeit their property. Paul von Mendelssohn-Bartholdy was an immediate target of the Nazi regime given his prominence, wealth and social standing. The Mendelssohns were Germany’s most prominent Jewish family. The famous composer Felix Mendelssohn was a family member, as was Enlightenment philosopher Moses Mendelssohn. Mendelssohn & Co. bank, established in 1795, was one of the five largest private banks in Germany.

By October 1934, Nazi policies and predation had obliterated the value of Mendelssohn-Barthtoldy’s 22% equity interest in Mendelssohn & Co., causing his income to plummet from about 430,270 RM in 1932 (the year before the Nazis took power in January 1933) to only 59,374 RM in 1934. So in less than two years Nazi policies had diminished Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s income by a staggering 86%. In 1934, Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s annual alimony expense alone more than doubled his diminished income. By negating the value of Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s primary asset, Nazi policies and pressure compelled him to seek liquidity from alternative sources.

Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s superlative private art collection, established over many years beginning in the early 1900’s, was one of his most significant assets and represented the only source of liquidity available to him to respond to his escalating negative cash flow deficit. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s collection was comprised of about 60 master works by luminaries such as Picasso, van Gogh, Braque, Monet and Renoir, among others.

Between September 1933 and February 1934, Nazi persecution compelled Mendelssohn-Bartholdy to sell or consign some 16 of these master works – including Madame Soler – having never even attempted to sell a single major artwork in the previous 25 years. The Mendelssohn heirs maintain that the loss of Madame Soler represented a signal milestone along a path that Nazi authorities meticulously engineered to marginalize Jews and deprive them of their property which facilitated later mass genocide.

2. Bavaria’s 1964 purchase of Madame Soler in New York

In 1964, the Bavarian State Paintings Collection (“BSPC”) purchased Madame Soler in New York City from art dealer Justin Thannhauser who had taken possession from Mendelssohn-Bartholdy in 1934. Former Nazi party member and the incoming director of the BSPC Halldor Soehner represented Bavaria in the purchase. Even though Soehner knew that Mendelssohn-Bartholdy had owned Madame Soler – and was expressly aware of the painting’s “Jewish Provenance” – he failed to ask Thannhauser the reasonable questions that the circumstances demanded: From whom did Thannhauser acquire Madame Soler? When did Thannhauser acquire it? What, if anything, did Thannhauser pay for it?

3. Bavaria’s current refusal to restitute Madame Soler, or even to apply to this claim its own prescribed criteria for Holocaust era restitution cases

In 2009, the Mendelssohn heirs sought restitution from the BSPC for Madame Soler. Notwithstanding its awareness of the clear evidence of a forced transfer from Mendelssohn-Bartholdy set forth above, the BSPC refused the exhaustively documented claim of the Mendelssohn heirs to return Madame Soler. Moreover, the BSPC failed to apply to this claim the criteria that it and other German states had specifically prescribed to resolve such controversies and which were expressed in a Common Statement as well as related Guidelines. In addition, the BSPC refused the request of the Mendelssohn heirs to submit their claim to the German Limbach Commission, which the German federal government and its constituent states established specifically to hear claims for the recovery of Nazi era artworks and to decide these claims in a non-binding, equitable and fair manner. Accordingly, the BSPC gave the Mendelssohn heirs no option but to file suit in New York to reclaim the painting.

“THE ROLLING STONES – 50 YEARS”: MONSTER-MEGA 2000 PAGES+EBOOK / A VERY SPECIAL PREVIEW: AN UNFORGETTABLE INTERVIEW WITH MICK JAGGER

“THE ROLLING STONES – 50 YEARS”: MONSTER-MEGA 2000 PAGES+EBOOK – The Early Stones

The German start-up The eBook People GmbH, a spin-off of the publishing house The Interview People GmbH (www.theinterviewpeople.com), is going to release its first comprehensive eBook in July which will feature the 50th stage anniversary of the band The Rolling Stones. Title: “The Rolling Stones – 50 Years”, Subtitle: “Views From The Inside – Views From The Outside”.

The eBook will be released in two parts. It will contain archive material from newspapers: old (partially not yet digitalized and inaccessible) articles, interviews, audios and images and put them all together in a two part ebook containing more than 2,000 pages! Part one will feature the first 25 years in 25 single chapters. Same with the second 25 years.

All of this is going to be edited and introduced by a great music journalist who is also working for the biggest national daily newspaper in Switzerland. His name is Hanspeter Künzler and among others he also works for Germany’s biggest music magazine “Musikexpress.”

The eBook is available at amazon.com, iTunes and selected publishing houses cooperating with The eBook People GmbH. Vogue Magazine is already covering it:
http://www.vogue.de/kultur/kultur-blog/total-stoned-ein-mega-e-book-zu-den-rolling-stones-ist-in-planung


* * *

MICK JAGGER: “YOU DON´T WANT TO PARTY EVERY NIGHT WITH THE DRUGS AND THE GIRLS AND THE ROCK’N’ROLL BUT SOME NIGHTS YOU MIGHT”

An unforgettable interview (2003) from The eBook “The Rolling Stones – 50 years”

Credit: Patrik Mallberg / The Interview People

“THE ROLLING STONES – 50 YEARS”: MONSTER-MEGA 2000 PAGES+EBOOK – The Early Stones

Paris in spring 2003, several weeks before the Stones kicked off their 2003 world tour. There is music coming out of the lobby bar at one of the most famous hotels in Paris. One sign that we’ve popped into a very special place is the pricing of two long drinks and a club sandwich. You can almost afford an inner European flight for that money – and I’m not talking economy class. Three other German journalists have the pleasure to talk to Mick before I get to do it. And you never know: do they ask questions that will make him upset? Is he not going to be in the mood for any further conversation with a journalist? But it doesn’t seem so. Mick’s publicist, a very kind , friendly and funny guy takes me up the stairs to the first floor. “Don’t you wanna look into my bag in terms of security,” I ask the gentleman. Walking half a meter before me he turns his head around, smiles and says: “Nope, we are not Madonna.”

Entering the room Mick appears to be so much smaller than you know him from TV appearances. Smiling, he welcomes me with a hand-shake and is ready to talk right away…

Hi Mick, what have been your career highlights?

Mick Jagger: It was great to getting the band going the very first time because you start to be successful for the first year or first couple of years and you´re like: All your little teenage dreams are, so to speak, coming true and you feel young and very ambitious and you’re starting to be successful – that feels really good, like getting your first job, doesn’t it?

What about the bad times?

Mick Jagger: Bad times. There’re lots of bad times in a career, you know. The Rolling Stones have had a pretty long career and always there´s been good things and bad things. People die, you know. But I mean I guess most of the times it´s been pretty positive.

What would you do if you had the chance to use a time  machine?

Mick Jagger: It´s quite interesting, you know. Do you ever read history books about “What if?”. What if Napoleon had conquered Russia and then it wouldn´t be like … and so it´s interesting if you follow these books through to their logical conclusions but it´s not really interesting unless you can do that. You know it is easy for me to say: Would have been nice if I had been a film director or a ballet dancer or an accountant. What would have happened? But you don’t know the answer.

Do believe in fate?

Mick Jagger: I don´t. But the problem is that your not completely in control of your life when you´re young. 

Have you ever told your children to do or not to do  something because of your experience?

Mick Jagger: You´re always telling and that’s what it is to do, it’s parenthood. What you do is giving parts of your experience to them. I mean, you don´t always save them from real life. Or you can use examples. That´s what you do with children all the time. 

Someone once said: If you don´t advance, you´re dead. So:  How far can you still advance after your big success?

Mick Jagger: You have to keep yourself from just repeating yourself. It´s very difficult to do in anything. Wether you´re a writer or a journalist or a painter. Especially the rock business is very narrow. It´s like a very narrow political party with very few views in it. And as soon as you´re striving it goes: “Oh no, wait a minute!” If you do a rock show with 25 half naked dancers, everyone goes: “Oh no but it´s awful, you can´t do that!” So the confines of it are very narrow and it´s very hard to keep anything interesting going within the narrow confines. So there are many, many conventions that you have to keep up.

Do you think that bands these days also have the chance  of becoming as big as the Stones are?

Mick Jagger: I think so. I mean the only thing is it´s been going longer as a musical form. So rock music as defined by, let’s say four blokes playing in a band, was quite new in the early 60ies. But now it´s 40 years old as you put it out. The whole idea and form is older now. So how many generations? Two? Three generations? So it´s like an old thing being handed down now. It´s probably more difficult to make such splash as it was, for that reason.

Do you have to do so much light show and other stuff on  stage?

Mick Jagger: It depends where you´re touring. In the early 60ties where you were playing in theatres, people don´t do a tremendous amount of all that stuff. And it was going on in the sixties. That´s where it all started, I mean there were a lot of that. But we´re going to play a theatre show that is very little, so in the Circus Krone show shouldn’t be much pyrotechnics. But if you´re playing in a bigger stadium, you gotta do something visual. You can´t just go on. That’s like a guitarist view of world.

Doesn’t that keep the attention away from the audience?

Mick Jagger: Yeah, but I think that really when you go to a big stadium show the people that go, “the punters” as we call them, are not really just going to hear some pristine music, it´s just a sort of allround experience. It´s halfway between going to a football match and a music show. You´re really looking forward, you want something to enhance your experience visually. To amplify and enhance the experience you need a bit more than just the music. The thing is that musicians think that´s all the people want, but I don´t share that view. 

Are you very extraordinary when it comes to choose the  hotel room or suite?

Mick Jagger: I don´t know, not really. (laughs) It´s sort of silly. When I´m working I like to have certain things. When I´m not working I do not really care about them very much. But when you´re working you want certain things. I don´t like to have a noisy traffic too much because then I can´t sleep for the show. The problem is: When you´re working you don´t want to sleep late because you want to be ready for a nine o´clock show rather than nine to five job. So I don´t like staying in the hotels that are noisy. 

You are over 60 years of age. Do you still like to party with the girls, drugs and Rock´n´Roll after every show?

Mick Jagger: No, you don´t want to party every night with the drugs and the girls and the Rock’n’Roll but some nights you might … 

Are the hotel-lobbies still as crowded with groupies as they used to be?

Mick Jagger: Well, some places are good. But it is not really where you look for your entertainment, to be honest.

What music are you currently listening to?

Mick Jagger: I don´t know, I listen to a lot of stuff that I bought when I was to see what´s in the store. The other day I bought some new records. I listen to some jazz. I mean I listen to everything to be honest. I´ve been to India, listened to a lot of Hindi-dance-music, it´s like pop here in England. 

Someone said that this tour was announced to be the last …

Mick Jagger: Well, I don´t know. You know, that’s the entertaining thing: You don´t really know what´s gonna happen. I´m planning and trying to work out what´s gonna happen next. So I´ve been working on what´s gonna happen at the next Rolling Stones shows.