THE NEW “PERMANENT COLLECTION OF CONTEMPORARY ART” OPENS IN ITALY (MARCHE REGION) SHOWING 158 WORKS, INCLUDING A PIECE BY ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

Saturday April 27, 2013 (10:30 am) at Palazzo Gasparini (a XVII Century palace) in Mercatello sul Metauroa picturesque and fascinating medieval town in Marche region (Pesaro Urbino, Italy) – will open the new Permanent Collection of Contemporary Art as a  completion of the St. Francis Museum of Ancient Art which will shortly be reopened to the public after the restorations. 

The collection shows 158 works including 32 sculptures and 126 paintings by established national and international artists. The initiative was made possible thanks to enthusiasm, passion and tenacity of artist and sculptor Pasquale Martini who has involved in the ambitious and prestigious project, the mayor of Mercatello sul  MetauroGiovanni Pistola, with the Municipal Administration, the local tourism association (Pro Loco) and the whole community. The works hosted in the Collection  have been generously donated by the selected artists. The official catalogue has been entirely realized with the contribution of Banca dell’Adriatico, a strong advocate of cultural promotion in the Marche region.

Bonita Cleri and Silvia Cupini – Art Historians at Urbino University – curated the critical texts about the artworks. The new Permanent Collection of Contemporary Art – Prof. Cuppini writes in the presentation of the catalogue – is  an important initiative that aims to extend Mercatello’s role as a place of art and contemporary feeling.

The permanent collection displays also a work created by Roberto Alborghetti for his “Lacer/actions” research about torn and decomposed publicity posters on outdoor billboards and about urban tokens. 

Roberto Alborghetti was proud to donate his work accepting the invitation from the Organization. Curator Pasquale Martini viewed some of Roberto Alborghetti’s works focusing his attention on an image that, according to Martini, depicts and interprets the sense of Alborghetti’s research about the “decomposed and contaminated signs of our times”.

The piece is titled “There is some chaos, with a focal point” (canvas, 63 x 43). The image was “captured” in Milan during a cloudy day on December 2010. Roberto Alborghetti is very glad to be part of this collection gathering national and international artists who are developing new forms and expressions in modern art.

  • The pics show: the beautiful “Palazzo Gasparini” (XVII Century), where the Permanent Collection has been installated ; the medieval historic center of Mercatello sul Metauro and “There is some chaos…” artwork by Roberto Alborghetti.    

  • ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI AT PERMANENT COLLECTION OF CONTEMPORARY ART, MERCATELLO SM, MARCHE, ITALY
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(HE)ART PLACES / THE NIGHT (AND THE SILENCE) IN THE FASCINATING MEDIEVAL TUSCANY VILLAGE

© Photos by ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

The historical centre of Abbadia San Salvatore (Siena, Tuscany, Italy) is a well kept medieval fortress-village, where you may walk through incredible narrow streets and squares, all built with the local grey stone.

The castle of Abbadia is first mentioned in a document dating to 1203, which shows that the community came under the aegis of a communal hierarchy headed by a Podestà, under the political control of Orvieto. A few years later, the strenght and power of this communal organization are described in the “bill of freedom” (“Carta delle libertà”) granted in 1212 to communal chancellors by the Abbot of the San Salvatore monastery.

The pattern of settlements in the area of Abbadia was defined around the mid-XII Century, when under the pressure of external threats, the local population, up until then scattered over the surrounding countryside, came together within one large fortified settlement.

The Abbey and all the Medieval centre are telling us how Abbadia San Salvatore was important in the past. All its area is rich in history and traditions, that to a great extent can be found in documents in the old archive belonging to the monastery dedicated to the Saviour. The archive contains many references to the importance and power of the Abbey.

In Abbadia we may also admire the Servadio Theatre (1873), a tiny but fascinating place. It was built thanks to the initiative of the Carli and Gragnoli families; it is dedicated to Giacomo Servadio (XIX Century) a Florentine member of Italian Parliament, banker, musician and theatre producer. Between the end of XIX Century and the beginning of the XX, the building was the seat of a friendly Society of the workers of Abbadia, where in XIX Century quicksilver mines began their activities, now closed and presented in a museum.

MIDNIGHT LIGHTS AT THE MEDIEVAL CASTLE TO SAY THAT LIFE AND WORLD (AND MY SHOW) WILL GO ON…

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This enchanting castle – which is hosting Roberto Alborghetti’s “Colors of an Apocalypse” Exhibition – tonight will be enlighted to say to the world that the life goes on… And the art show too (it will be opened to visitors until January 15, 20013). Rocca Aldobrandesca (in Piancastagnaio, Siena, Tuscany, Italy) becomes tonight an outstanding symbol of the times (and of the life). It was built in XIII Century, but it still well and alive… And it is stronger than Maya prophecies…

But let’s know something more about this fascinating fortress, one of the most impressive Medieval Italian castle, a perfect location for Roberto Alborghetti ‘s show. Since the 11th century the area of southern Tuscany around the castle of Piancastagnaio was the object of the expansionist politics of the powerful feudal family of the Aldobrandeschi. The whole territory is rich in historical remains tied to these potentates. Between the possessions of the Aldobrandeschi, Piancastagnaio was almost always the site of allotted to the noble family from the monks of the Abbey of S.Salvatore since the beginning of the year 1000. Subsequently it was claimed from the Viscounts of Campiglia and during the 13th century it became object of ulterior disputes between the cities of Siena and Orvieto.

The Orvietani gained control of the powerful fortress in the 1303 and maintained it for around fifty years. At this point they entered in the quarrel with the heirs of the Aldobrandeschi, the Orsini of Pitigliano, to       oppose the new aims of the Senese Republic. Only between the years 1415 and 1430 Siena finally succeeded to taking possession of Piancastagnaio,       that was attached to the Capitanato of Radicofani. In 17th century the settlement became a Granducal fief and finally, with the Leopoldine reforms, the chief town of the the same community.

The country town has a circular form, once had surrounding wall enclosure with alternating square towers and four gates. The walls and the gates       have been almost entirely demolished, with the exception of few lines, three towers, two with semicircular shape and the other squared, the main       city Gate beside the Rocca and other three minor Gates in the southern front of the walls: Porta Romana, Porticciola e Porta di Voltaia.

In the highest point of the inhabited area rises still today the mighty Rocca Aldobrandesca. The construction has a square form and is endowed with tall and strongly inclined walls. From the enclosure rises two towers , the greatest, either as thickest, had functions of keep, the other, in the opposite angle, defended the underlying gate of access to the city.

The whole complex was endowed with machicoulis and battlement, still today almost intact. The Rocca is under good condition thanks to careful work of restoration.

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THAT MAGICAL CRYPT IN THE TUSCANY MEDIEVAL VILLAGE WHERE THE ITALIAN LANGUAGE WAS BORN

Abbadia San Salvatore, on Amiata Mount (Siena area, Tuscany, Italy) is a place rich of art and history… 

 

In Abbadia San Salvatore, on Amiata MountSiena area, Tuscany, Italy – there is a magical and capturing place. You find it on the ancient abbey church. It is a crypt, where you may breath the history and the beauty of one of the most fascinating Tuscany village.

According the documents, the crypt was built in VIII Century. It was restored in XX Century and now we may admire it in all its beauty. Everytime I have the way to visit it, I always feel astonished by its magic. It happened again a few days ago, when I was in Abbadia SS. for the XIII edition of “Penne and Video Sconosciuti”, the national festival for school journals and videos produced by italian schools.

The Longobard crypt shows 32 columns that form 13 small aisles. They are made in various shapes; some of them are round, with different sculpured ornaments. Also the beautiful capitals are sculptured in various shapes, as palm leaves, loto flowers or animal heads.

 

The abbey and all the Medieval centreare telling us how Abbadia San Salvatore was important in the past. All its area is rich in history and traditions, that to a great extent can be found in documents in the old archive belonging to the monastery dedicated to the Saviour at Amiata Mount. The archive contains many references to the importance and power of the abbey, but little or no reference is made to the early Medieval history of the surrounding land and area, or about the people who used to live there.

The castle of Abbadia is first mentioned in a document dating to 1203, which shows that the community was came under the aegis of a communal hierarchy headed by a Podestà, under the political control of Orvieto. A few years later, the strenght and power of this communal organization are described in the “bill of freedom” (“carta delle libertà”) granted in 1212 to communal chancellors by the Abbot of the San Salvatore monastery.

The pattern of settlements in the area of Abbadia was defined around the mid-XII Century, when under the pressure of external threats, the local population, up until then scattered over the surrounding countryside, came together within one large fortified settlement.

 

This Benedectine monastery was founded by Erfo, a Longobard nobleman, in the VIII Century, under King Astolfo, and it was dedicated to the Saviour, which was typical of that people and in the tradition of christian religion. It rose on the east side of Amiata Mount in order to reclaim the surrounding woods and forests. It also overlooked the Via Francigena, running through the Paglia Valley.

The imperial abbey greatly developed in the Carolingian period thanks to Charlemagne‘s and Ludovick‘s confirmation of its landed propertues and privileges, Around the year 1000, under Abbot Winizo, it increased its power by acquiring new territories. The church and the crypt were rebuilt in 1036. In 1228 the monastery passed to the Cistercians. It was suppressed by grand-duke Pietro Leopoldo in 1782 and re-opened later.

 

In the year 1087, a certain Miciarello and his wife Gualdrada made a donation in favour of the monastery of St Saviour. Below the donation document, the notary Ranieri signed three verses, commonly known as “Cartula Amiatina” (“The Amiata Footnote”). This extemporary poem represents to linguists the first voice of vernacular coming from Tuscany. That is, the first expressions recording the evolution of the Italian language.

But this is not the only important document about Amiata History. Till XIX Century, the monastery hosted the famous “Bibbia Amiatina”“The Amiata Bible” – which is considered the oldest latin version ever known. The Amiata Bible – a real art masterpiece, written by amanuensis monks – is now kept in Florence, but we may see a photo-reproduction in the Monastery Museum.

The historical centre is a well kept fortress-village, where you may walk through incredible narrow streets and squares, all built with the local grey stone. You may admire the Servadio Theatre (1873), a tiny but fascinating place. It was built thanks to the initiative of the Carli and Gragnoli families; it is dedicated to Giacomo Servadio (XIX Century) a Florentine member of Italian Parliament, banker, musician and theatre producer. Between the end of XIX Century and the beginning of the XX, the building was the seat of a friendly Society of the workers of Abbadia, where in XIX Century quicksilver mines began their activities, now closed and presented in a museum.

By ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI