THE SPIRIT OF THE TIMES: A SET OF SIX COCA-COLA VINTAGE ART POSTERS MADE BY FAMOUS ILLUSTRATORS

 

 

Yes, I like publicity posters. They are one of the subjects of my visual research (Lacer/actions) about torn and decomposed outdoor advertisings. But I also like advertisings in general… Some weeks ago I found in my attic an interesting set of six vintage rare Coca-Cola posters. They laid aside in an old wardrobe… They reproduce beautiful vintage art created by famous artists. I think that the series was printed in 80’s reproducing original works by N.C. Wyeth, Norman Rockwell, Ella Dolbar and Massengale. They are in a good condition. Some pieces of true popular art…       

Throughout its history, The Coca-Cola Company has captured the spirit of the times through its advertising art. From its first promotional calendars produced in the 1890s, the Company linked itself to the popular designs and lifestyles of the era the art represents. The Coca-Cola Company used the work of the top artists of the day, including the leading artists of America’s Golden Age of Illustration. The famous illustrators produced paintings for The Coca-Cola Company from the turn of the century into the 1960s, when their art form was replaced by photography in the Company’s advertising.

Much of the work of artists working on behalf of The Coca-Cola Company is beautifully displayed in a book, “Coca-Cola Girls: An Advertising Art History by Chris H. Beyer” (Collectors Press, Inc.). The earliest use of an artist’s signature by The Coca-Cola Company was on the work of Hamilton King, who illustrated the beautiful “Coca-Cola girls” for calendars from 1910 to 1913. His work also appears on serving trays.

Over the next quarter century, the Company used a wide variety of illustrators, some of whom signed their works. But most did not. The anonymous craftsmen produced lavish illustrations with deep colors that graced calendars and other promotional pieces. In the mid 1920s, The Coca-Cola Company began working with a young illustrator who would become synonymous with both Coca-Cola and Santa Claus. His name was Haddon H. Sundblom. Other famous illustrators who created works for Coca-Cola included: Norman Rockwell (1894-1978), N.C. Wyeth (1882-1945), Gil Elvgren (1914-1980), Fredrick Mizen (1888-1964), Frederic Stanley (1892-1967) and Commissioned Folk Art.

For contacts: ro.alb@alice.it

SOMEWHERE IN THE COSMOS… SCENE FROM A CRACKS MAGNIFICATION (IT’S NOT A PAINTING OR A DIGITAL WORK)

© ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – CRACKS – LACER/ACTIONS PROJECT

© ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – CRACKS – LACER/ACTIONS PROJECT

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Someone told me that CRACKS – and all my LACER/ACTIONS researches about torn and decomposed publicity posters – are a sort of  “Wabi-sabi” expression (it’s the Japanese art of finding beauty in imperfection and profundity in nature, of accepting the natural cycle of growth and decay…) 

In fact, “Wabi-sabi” celebrates cracks and crevices and all what is marking time, weather, ages and so on… Architect Tadao Ando says: “Wabi-sabi reminds us that we are all but transient beings on this planet-that our bodies as well as the material world around us are in the process of returning to the dust from which we came. Through wabi-sabi, we learn to embrace liver spots, rust, and frayed edges, and the march of time they represent.” (Read more atWhat Is Wabi-Sabi)

Cracks is part of my Lacer/actions Project, about  the decomposition of torn publicity posters on outside advertisings (my realistic and not manipulated images are transferred on canvases, lithographic prints or textiles). I’ve been also researching on metal and plastic surfaces, or metal and plastic platings. This is the wonderful world of Cracks… My eyes and cameras discovered in cracks magnifications amazings textures.  Also my Cracks are realistic, natural, random and not enhanced images, as you see in this picture, which is not a painting, but a real scene from this real world… I took in Bergeggi (Liguria, Italy) two months ago…

THE CRACKS GALLERY – robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com

CRACKS – BROKEN BUT NOT SPLIT / THE VIDEOCLIP

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Cracks is part of  Roberto Alborghetti Lacer/actions Project, about  the decomposition of torn publicity posters on outside advertisings (realistic and not manipulated images are transferred on canvases, lithographic prints, textiles or re-built on collages).

Since 2009 he has been also workin’ on metal, plastic or stony surfaces, or metal and plastic platings, entering the wonderful world of Cracks… We are surrounded by cracks. We live in a planet of cracks. And cracks may be considered as a life’s metaphor, as “an active aesthetical appreciation” of what we call the disturbing elements of imperfection.

Roberto Alborghetti discovered in cracks magnifications other astonishing textures. All Cracks are realistic, natural, random and not enhanced images, as you may see in this videoclip.  More Cracks will be shown  soon in a special gallery… 

CRACKS  © ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

CRACKS © ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

 

 

CRACKS (& LACERATIONS): THE “ACTIVE AESTHETICAL APPRECIATION” OF THE SO-CALLED “DISTURBING ELEMENTS” / IMAGE #7

CRACKS  © ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI - IMAGE # 7

CRACKS © ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – IMAGE # 7

THE CRACKS WEEK: THE 7th IMAGE

Cracks is part of my Lacer/actions Project, about  the decomposition of torn publicity posters on outside advertisings (my realistic and not manipulated images are transferred on canvases, lithographic prints or textiles).

Since 2009 I’ve been also workin’ on another matter. Not paper but metal, plastic or stony surfaces, or metal and plastic platings. So, I entered the wonderful world of Cracks… We are surrounded by cracks. We live in a planet of cracks. And cracks may be considered as a life’s metaphor. Yes, cracks as “an active aesthetical appreciation” of what we call the disturbing elements of imperfection.

My eyes and cameras discovered, in cracks magnifications, another astonishing textures in what we usually consider waste materials. Also my Cracks are realistic, natural, random and not enhanced images, as you see in this picture. More Cracks will be on line soon in a special gallery… 

MY CRACKS AS “WABI-SABI”, THE JAPANESE ART OF CELEBRATING CREVICES AND TIME MARKS…

 

 

CRACKS  © ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI - IMAGE # 6

CRACKS © ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI – IMAGE # 6

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THE CRACKS WEEK: THE 6th IMAGE

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Some friends of mine who work in arts told me that CRACKS – and all my LACER/ACTIONS researches about torn and decomposed publicity posters – are a sort of European example of “Wabi-sabi” which is the Japanese art of finding beauty in imperfection and profundity in nature, of accepting the natural cycle of growth and decay…

Yes, I’m glad for this matching. In fact, “Wabi-sabi” celebrates cracks and crevices and all the other marks that time, weather, and loving use leave behind. Architect Tadao Ando says: “Wabi-sabi reminds us that we are all but transient beings on this planet-that our bodies as well as the material world around us are in the process of returning to the dust from which we came. Through wabi-sabi, we learn to embrace liver spots, rust, and frayed edges, and the march of time they represent.” (Read more at What Is Wabi-Sabi)

Cracks is part of my Lacer/actions Project, about  the decomposition of torn publicity posters on outside advertisings (my realistic and not manipulated images are transferred on canvases, lithographic prints or textiles). Since 2009 I’ve been also workin’ on another matter. Not paper but metal and plastic surfaces, or metal and plastic platings. So, I entered the wonderful world of Cracks… We are surrounded by cracks. We live in a planet of cracks. And cracks may be considered as a life’s metaphor. My eyes and cameras discovered, in cracks magnifications, another astonishing textures in what we usually consider waste materials. Also my Cracks are realistic, natural, random and not enhanced images, as you see in this picture.

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