WELCOME TO “HAIGA GALLERY”: IMAGES AND WORDS FOR A TRIP THROUGH IMAGINATION

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 Last november I posted a series of “haiga” . Fellow bloggers and lot of friends seemed to like my collaboration with musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, USA); we had previously collaborated on a music videoclip (“Linger”).

In a different kind of collaboration, fusing Joshua ‘s words with my images – realistic pics of torn posters and urban signs – we have presented four haiga (titles: Moonlit Sky, In a Spider Web, A Jar of Rainwater and No Clouds), a combination of haiku and visual art.

 Now, answering to request, I’d like to present all the haiga series in one post (you can see it on the slideshow). As usual, I took the images from ripped poster sticked on billboards or from cities walls (there are a lot of incredible “signs” to watch…). On occasion I want to thank Joshua Sellers for his beautiful poems. Let your eyes go on a fascinating trip through imagination and states of mind…

in a spider web

ABOUT HAIGA

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

No Clouds

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/28/no-clouds-poetic-verses-by-joshua-sellers-one-of-my-images-from-torn-posters/

A Jar of Rainwater

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/haiku-and-visual-art-telling-a-jar-of-rainwater/

In a Spider Web

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/14/in-a-spider-web-words-and-images-for-a-trip-trhough-perception/

Moonlit Sky

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/07/moonlit-skythe-first-haigalaceractions-by-joshua-sellers-and-roberto-alborghetti/

Links to “Linger” videoclip by Joshua Sellers and Roberto Alborghetti

Earscapes Channel

http://youtu.be/iTtli44H66w

Lacer/azioni Channel

http://youtu.be/lOTx5QphUjE

A LOVELY COMMENT FROM FRIEND BLOGGER “LE ARTIST BOOTS”:

http://leartisteboots.wordpress.com/2012/01/20/my-best-wishes-with-this-special-haiga/comment-page-1/#comment-193

ABOUT JOSHUA SELLERS

Joshua Sellers has attended the University of Louisiana at Monroe studying music composition.  Over the years, Joshua has worked as a performer, songwriter, producer, engineer, DJ and musical collaborator in classical, rock, folk, jazz, avant-garde, electronica and ambient music.  As a member of the pop-rock duo Joker, Joshua released the album Homecoming in 2009.

In addition to musical projects, Joshua Sellers has been given an arts grant by the state of Louisiana for a poetry reading at the Masur Museum of Art (1996).  Joshua has also been a co-editor of Hart Beats, a journal of philosophy and spirituality published in Monroe (1996-1998).
Joshua has long been fascinated with the sound textures.  As a child, he would play with tape recorders, altering the tape speed or running the tape in reverse.  Joshua Sellers: “I discovered that you could use a recording device not simply to document sound, but to create unique sounds never heard before.”

Reviving his interest in these childhood experiments, Joshua first began recording ambient music under the pseudonym Murmur in 2003.  Rather than rely on the latest state-of-the-art synthesisers, Joshua uses found sounds, toy keyboards, electric guitars and shakuhachi as sound sources.
Joshua Sellers: “In music, we place traditional musical elements like rhythm, melody and harmony in the foreground and so we tend to not notice the actual texture as much.  In my music, that’s a perception I want to reverse.”
In 2010, Joshua Sellers completed his first full-length album of ambient music, Amniosis.  A new EP, State of Flux, is due to be released later in 2011, followed by a large-scale work, Elemental. Joshua Sellers: “I like to think of my pieces as enigmatic abstract icons, each providing a quiet meditative space and luminous presence of its own.”

Joshua Sellers currently lives in West Memphis, Arkansas, with future plans to emigrate to New Zealand.

www.earscapes.com

ABOUT ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

Professional reporter, author and visual artist, Roberto Alborghetti has written more than thirty books (biographies, interviews, stories). He worked in magazines and newspapers and produced Tv documentaries. Editor in chief of magazines concerning didactic, education, edutainment and media literacy, he leads workshops and conferences. He has won important journalism Prizes, such as Premio Acqui Terme, Premio Beppe Viola, Premio Anmil Safety in Work. He is the unique Italian reporter who received the European Award for Environmental Reporting, the so called European “Pulitzer” about Environmental Reporting (1992, European Parliament, Strasbourg).

He created “LaceR/Actions”, a multidisciplinary project concerning in a research about torn posters and urban “signs” taken from city walls. Impressed by photocamera and transferred on canvas, reproduced on lithographs or textiles, or scanned in a videoclip, the details of torn advertisings give new life to paper wastes.

In 2009, he published a “booklet-portfolio” – “Lacer/actions, Pics of torn (publi)city – gathering a selection of 40 pictures chosen among 30.000 pics that Roberto Alborghetti took during his research about torn (publi)city. In July 2010, thirty thousand people visited his show “The Four Elements of LaceR/Actions” at Oriocenter (Milano Bergamo Orio International Airport). Roberto Alborghetti’s pics are also taking part of experiences about sensorial and emotional perception (sinestesys) concerning kinesiologic tests. Alborghetti is also invited to lead workshops about his artworks.

In October 2011, he participated at Parallax Art Fair in London (La Galleria, Royal Opera Arcade, Pall Mall). He showed 3 artworks (mixed media/canvas): “Nine Eleven/New York 2001, Victims & Martyrs, The Blood Track #2”, “As fast running water…”, “I don’t like to stand still”. The famous “The Huffington Post” (September 2011) wrote about his artwork devoted to Nine Eleven Fallen; article by dr. Srini Pillay, Psychiatrist, Harvard clinician, brain imaging researcher, executive coach, author (Life Unlocked, The Science behind the Law of Attraction, Your Brain and Business: the Neuroscience of the Great Leaders).

One of his recent works was selected to be part of the new Contemporary Art Museum projected and created in in Italy (Marche region) by the artist Pasquale Martini.

He created more than 40 videoclips posted at his YouTube channel.

 Art critics and experts said that Roberto Alborghetti’s art has an “exceptional and evocative dynamic”, “a strong power of language”; it shows “new points of observation that overwhelm canonical trial systems”, “breaking the current patterns of visual art.” Alborghetti’s Artworks “are explosions of color, passion, joy, sorrow, story, emotion, beauty, love…”, “They touch us on the raw and go straight to the heart”, ” a provocation to our eyes and to our mind”.

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MY BEST WISHES WITH THIS SPECIAL “HAIGA”

 

Dark night

Snowflakes and frost

Before the New Day

 

Notte scura

Fiocchi di neve e gelo

Prima del Giorno Nuovo

 This Season’s Greetings card fuses, in an “Haiga”, words (“Haiku”) and visual art. The image (lithograph, 50×70) is part of “Lacer/actions” collection, concerning my research about torn posters and urban signs. I thank my “haiga” teacher: poet, musician and producer Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, Usa).

 Questo cartoncino augurale fonde – in quello che la cultura nipponica definisce “Haiga” – parole (“Haiku”) ed arte visuale. L’immagine (litografia, 50×70) fa parte della mia raccolta “Lacer/azioni”, relativa alla ricerca dei particolari dei manifesti pubblicitari lacerati e dei “segni” urbani. Ringrazio il mio “maestro di haiga”, il poeta, musicista e produttore Joshua Sellers, di West Memphis (Arkansas, Usa).

ENJOY THE CLIP:

http://youtu.be/nWvkGQlWpFE

http://animoto.com/play/pAjS6z18z4sRIhbIl1q18A

http://vodpod.com/watch/15820712-seasons-greetings-haiga-haiku?u=robertoalborghetti&c=robertoalborghetti

 ABOUT HAIGA

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

 

A LOVELY COMMENT FROM FRIEND BLOGGER “LE ARTISTE BOOTS”:

http://leartisteboots.wordpress.com/2012/01/20/my-best-wishes-with-this-special-haiga/comment-page-1/#comment-193

 

NO CLOUDS: POETIC VERSES BY JOSHUA SELLERS + ONE OF MY IMAGES FROM TORN POSTERS

Joshua Sellers words fused in Roberto Alborghetti’s Lacer/actions artworks: it’s an HAIGA

 

No clouds

the wind revealed

in tall grasses

 

Nessuna nuvola

il vento rivelato

nelle erbe alte

 

Pas des nuages

le vent révélè

dans les hautes herbes

 

Ninguna nube

el viento revelado

en las hierbas altas

 

No clouds” is another result of my collaboration with musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers, from West Memphis (Arkansas, USA). We had previously collaborated on a music video, for “Linger.” Now, in a different kind of collaboration, fusing Joshua ‘s words this time with my images – realistic pics of torn posters and urban signs – , we have presented a series of haiga: a combination of haiku and visual art. Here is the fourth of a series we have created so far. Poetry and my “Lacer/actions” artworks for a fascinating trip through imagination and states of mind… I took this image from a billboard’s ripped poster. Maybe unbelievable, but it’s true. ( 4 )

 

ABOUT HAIGA

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

 

Watch the previous Haiga:

 A Jar of Rainwater: the third Haiga+Lacer/actions art:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/21/haiku-and-visual-art-telling-a-jar-of-rainwater/

 

 

In a Spider Web: the second Haiga+Lacer/actions art:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/14/in-a-spider-web-words-and-images-for-a-trip-trhough-perception/

 

 

 

Moonlit Sky: the first Haiga+Lacer/actions art:

https://robertoalborghetti.wordpress.com/2011/11/07/moonlit-skythe-first-haigalaceractions-by-joshua-sellers-and-roberto-alborghetti/

 

 

Links to “Linger” videoclip by Joshua Sellers and Roberto Alborghetti

 

Earscapes Channel

http://youtu.be/iTtli44H66w

 

Lacer/azioni Channel

http://youtu.be/lOTx5QphUjE

 

 

IN A SPIDER WEB: WORDS AND IMAGES FOR A TRIP THROUGH PERCEPTION

Joshua Sellers Haiga fused in Roberto Alborghetti’s Lacer/actions

In a spider web

cherry blossom petals

twilight breeze

*

In una tela del ragno

petali di fiore di ciliegio

brezza del crepuscolo

*

Dans une toile de l’araignée

pétales du fleur de cerisier

brise du crépuscule

*

En la telaraňa

petalos de la flor de cerezo

brisa del crepusculo

*

 Musician, producer and poet Joshua Sellers and I had previously collaborated on a music video, for “Linger.” Now, in a different kind of collaboration, fusing Joshua ‘s words this time with my images – realistic pics of torn posters and urban signs – , we are presenting a series of haiga: a combination of haiku and visual art. Here is the second of a series of four we have created so far. Poetry and my “Lacer/actions” artworks for a fascinating trip through imagination and states of mind… This image isn’t a detail of a ripped poster, but a particular of a couch surface…

(2 – To be continued)

 ABOUT HAIGA

Haiga is a style of Japanese painting based on the aesthetics of haikai, from which haiku poetry derives, which often accompanied such poems in a single piece. Like the poetic forms it accompanied, haiga was based on simple, yet often profound, observations of the everyday world. Stephen Addiss points out that “since they are both created with the same brush and ink, adding an image to a haiku poem was… a natural activity.”

Just as haiku often internally juxtapose two images, haiga may also contain a juxtaposition between the haiku itself and the art work. The art work does not necessarily directly represent the images presented in the haiku. Stylistically, haiga vary widely based on the preferences and training of the individual painter, but generally show influences of formal Kanō school painting, minimalist Zen painting, and Ōtsu-e, while sharing much of the aesthetic attitudes of the nanga tradition. Some were reproduced as woodblock prints. The subjects painted likewise vary widely, but are generally elements mentioned in the calligraphy, or poetic images which add meaning or depth to that expressed by the poem.

THAT STRANGE COINCIDENCE OF “SHAKUHACHI” AND “LINGER”…

Joshua Sellers, composer and producer based in West Memphis, posted me this message:

I had to share this funny (and pleasing) coincidence with you. Searching on YouTube for shakuhachi music, I came across a shakuhachi player Ninjutsu (far more disciplined than me!) who has recorded some wonderful music which I just downloaded from iTunes. But what was funny was that the top video he listed under his favourites on his YouTube page is our video for “Linger”! What a strange coincidence! LOL! I just had to share that odd discovery with you :-)”

Thanks Josh for sharing this curious coincidence: how small the web (and the world) are. On his Riverflow blog, Joshua explained what “shakuhachi” is. It is a Japanese end-blown flute. It is traditionally made of bamboo, but versions now exist in ABS and hardwoods. It was used by the monks of the Fuke school of Zen Buddhism in the practice of suizen (吹禅?, blowing meditation). Its soulful sound made it popular in 1980s pop music in the English-speaking world.

 So here’s the link to NinjutsuLives on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/user/NinjutsuLives

 Links to the “Linger” video on YouTube pages:

 Earscapes Channel

http://youtu.be/iTtli44H66w

 Lacer/azioni Channel

http://youtu.be/lOTx5QphUjE

 www.earscapes.com